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    Ring the Bells – Volunteers Needed for A Happy Christmas

     

     (SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.) – On Friday November 18, The Salvation Army Corps of San Bernardino begins its annual “Red Kettle” Bell Ringing Campaign.  Bell Ringers at the familiar Red Kettles seek donations from local residents to help local families in need during this holiday season.
    “Our goal is to raise $150,000 this year to help families have a Happy Christmas and to house the homeless, feed the hungry, and provide hope to the hopeless.  This is our major fundraiser for the year.  Last year we raised about $100,000 during the holiday season,” said Major Daniel Henderson.
    “We are looking for volunteers to Ring the Bells and raise money for The Salvation Army to help the needy this holiday season,” said Major Henderson.  “When volunteers ‘Ring the Bells’ it increases the amount of money The Salvation Army has to help people in need.”
    The Salvation Army is inviting local colleges, universities, social clubs, service groups, elected officials, singers, bands, local actors, clubs and companies to Ring the Bells at local retail stores.  People are signing up to help.
    President Tomas Morales of California State University, San Bernardino and President Matthew Madrid of The Art Institute of California – Inland Empire are asking their students, staff and faculty to join the effort to Ring the Bells and help our local people in need.
     
    “Assemblymember Cheryl Brown along with San Bernardino City Councilmember John Valdivia are the first elected officials who have volunteered to Ring the Bells this holiday season,” said Major Henderson.  Stater Bros. Markets, Under Armour and Target are also providing volunteers.
    Festively-dressed volunteers ringing bells will be deployed to retail outlets in San Bernardino, Grand Terrace, Highland, Colton, Rialto and Bloomington.  “Some sing, some dance, some play instruments and some just use their wonderful smiles and the familiar silver bells to attract donations,” said Major Henderson.
    The tradition of The Salvation Army “Kettle” during the Christmas Holidays was started in 1891 in San Francisco, by Captain Joseph McFee, in an effort to collect enough money to provide a free Christmas dinner to the poor. Now the tradition has spread worldwide. It has been in San Bernardino since its early years.

    Steve Pinckney has volunteered his time ringing the bells as part of his ministry work with the Salvation Army Corps. Steve is graduate of the Salvation Army's Adult Rehabilitation Center and is participants in the Salvation Army Corps's Path-To-Prosperity program

    Steve Pinckney has volunteered his time to Ring the Bells as part of his ministry work with the Salvation Army Corps. Steve is graduate of the Salvation Army’s Adult Rehabilitation Center and a past participants in the Salvation Army Corps’s Path-To-Prosperity program.

    Donations collected during the Christmas kettle campaign in San Bernardino are used to provide food baskets and other essential during the Christmas season.  Donations are also used by The Salvation Army throughout the year to provide emergency services including food; lodging for homeless or displaced families; clothing and furniture; children’s afterschool and summer camp programs, assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available.
    The Salvation Army volunteers will Ring the Bells at local locations including: Stater Bros. Markets, Walmart, Inland Center Mall, JC Penneys, Walgreens, Macy’s, Sam’s Club, CVS Pharmacy, Big Lots! and Ralphs.
    The Salvation Army also needs donations of toys for children’s Christmas gifts, along with turkeys, hams, stuffing, canned goods, vegetables, pies, cakes and other food for Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners and food baskets.
    “We always need food donations,” said Major Henderson.  “We serve meals to about 300 people a day at our Homeless Shelter, Transitional Living Center, Path to Prosperity Program and free meals every day at 4:45, so food goes fast.  We also need donations for our annual free Thanksgiving and Christmas meals, served every year since 1887.”
    Volunteers serve Thanksgiving Dinner at  The Salvation Army: Serving on the food line (left to right) is Nancy Veaegas, Niyahn Summey, Walt Summey, and Robert Sanchez.  We are ready for Christmas Dinners.

    Volunteers serve Thanksgiving Dinner at The Salvation Army: Serving on the food line (left to right) is Nancy Veaegas, Niyahn Summey, Walt Summey, and Robert Sanchez. We are ready for Christmas Dinners.

    To volunteer, or if companies who want to donate the staffing of a location to Ring the Bells and help the needy this holiday season, call Lt. Cathie McCulley at The San Bernardino Salvation Army at (909) 888-1336.
     
    About The Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps
    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and also offers evangelical programs for boys, girls and adults. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY. Our local number is (909) 888-1336.
     
    Roslyn Billings (Salvation Army Advisory Board member)  and family volunteer as a Salvation Army bellringer! If your family, organization or business can supply enough people to ring bells at one of the San Bernardino Corps Red Kettle locations for an entire day, please volunteer by calling (909) 888-1336.

    Roslyn Billings (Salvation Army Advisory Board member) and family volunteer Ring the Bells as a Salvation Army bellringer! If your family, organization or business can ring the bells at one of the San Bernardino Corps Red Kettle locations for an entire day, please volunteer by calling Lt. Cathie at (909) 888-1336.

    -end-

    Rialto Mayor Robertson – Why I Run

    Mayor Robertson, Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson,

    Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson, said. “When I took office, my goals were to stabilize our financial future, improve the economic and business development in Rialto, create greater job opportunities, hire the local workforce and make Rialto a safe place to live, work and play.”

    (Rialto, Calif.)  Newly retired, Deborah Robertson drove around Rialto and quickly decided what she would do with all that “free time.” She put all her efforts in running for mayor.

    Four years later and one term as mayor, Mayor Robertson is still working to keep Rialto moving in the right direction. During her first term, which began in 2012, economic opportunities went up while crime went down. Her collaboration with neighboring cities along the Interstate 10 corridor will result in better traffic flow, even as more industrial jobs take root in the area.

    “I feel the role of mayor is a calling, not just a title,” said Mayor Robertson, who was a three-term city councilwoman before her first term as mayor. “When I took office, my goals were to stabilize our financial future, improve the economic and business development in Rialto, create greater job opportunities, hire the local workforce and make Rialto a safe place to live, work and play.”

    “Today, our businesses are on the rise, a greater number of residents are part of the local workforce, crime statistics are down and we as a community have made a tremendous commitment to improving our streets and roads.”

    In working on the needs of the city, Mayor Robertson leaned on her vast experience. A native Californian, Mayor Robertson holds an undergraduate degree in Urban Planning and a master’s degree in Public Administration. Before retiring, she was the Deputy District Director of External Affairs for the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans).

    Partnering with the cities of Fontana, Colton and San Bernardino, the focus has been on economic development and the creation of jobs in the fields of technology, transportation along with commercial endeavors.

    “A major accomplishment has been attracting businesses to this city and the surrounding communities,” Mayor Robertson said. “We focus on where we are (geographically). The footprint has been cast. Anything that goes from the ports to the rest of the United States – 90 percent of it has to pass through the Inland Empire. We need to see the technology of moving goods and make sure the skill sets for these jobs are transferred into our community so our people are competitive.”

    The biggest project for the city is the Renaissance at the north end of Rialto, formerly Rialto Airport. Through legislation, the city was able to redirect aviation activity to San Bernardino International Airport (Formerly Norton Air Force Base). More than 1,500 acres are being redeveloped into housing, commercial, industrial and entertainment areas, also bringing tax revenue and jobs.

    “Rialto is the jewel of the Inland Empire,” Mayor Robertson said. “I have a plan and I want to continue to execute the plan to move Rialto forward.”

    For more information about Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson go to: http://www.DeborahRobertson.org.

    About Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson

    Deborah Robertson was elected Mayor of Rialto in November 2012 – the latest achievement in a distinguished public service career that has included 12 years on the Rialto City Council, leadership positions at the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG), the San Bernardino Associated Governments (SANBAG), and more than 20 years with the California Department of Transportation.

    Under Mayor Robertson’s leadership, Rialto has gained regional and national recognition for innovation in the areas of public-private partnerships, business development and job creation. The City’s refinancing and restructuring of its water and wastewater operations has become a model for other communities in California, pumping millions of dollars into the local economy.

    Mayor Robertson retired from Caltrans in 2011, as Deputy District Director of External Affairs. A native Californian, she holds an undergraduate degree in Urban Planning from the University of California, San Diego, a Masters Degree in Public Administration from the City University of New York Bernard Baruch College and is a National Urban Fellows recipient. She is also a scholarship recipient and past participant of the Southern California Leadership Network.

    Mayor Robertson has two children and six grandchildren, that are the joy of her life.

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    Rialto Mayor Robertson #RialtoPride

     

    Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson told the students to challenge anyone with a negative image of their city. In turn, the teens put out the hashtag #RialtoPride and it immediately began trending among local students. The conversations started to center around why they love Rialto and a movement was begun.

    Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson told the students to challenge anyone with a negative image of their city. In turn, the teens put out the hashtag #RialtoPride and it immediately began trending among local students. The conversations started to center around why they love Rialto and a movement was begun.

    (Rialto, Calif.) She is not from the generation that made Twitter-speak common, but Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson certainly knows her way around a hashtag.

    High schoolers and young voters have taken Mayor Robertson’s re-election slogan of #RialtoPride and soon it morphed it into a new nickname for the incumbent mayor — #MayorGetItDoneRobertson.
    Mayor Robertson is running for her second term as mayor, and fifth term in Rialto city government. Election Day is November 8. She is also Rialto’s first Black Mayor.

    Mayor Robertson chuckled about the name given to her originally by some Rialto High School students after spending the day with her during a mock city council. It shows that beyond economic development and crime statistics, Mayor Robertson – a nearly 30-year resident – has a deep-rooted pride in her city.

    “I feel the negative images of cities are often portrayed in TV shows such as ‘Cops,’ “Mayor Robertson said. “Often you see a negative image, yet crime continues to decrease in Rialto. But negatives get the program ratings.”

    Mayor Robertson pointed out that in the past five years, violent crime in Rialto has steadily declined and according to city-data.com, Rialto fell below the national average in 2014 and crime continues to drop. Rialto now ranks among the top half in safest communities in San Bernardino County, city-data.com also shows. The unemployment rate in Rialto has steadily dropped since 2013, according to homefact.com and the rate is now at seven percent.

    Raised in a military community in San Diego, Mayor Robertson said she learned civic pride at an early age. When new kids came to her elementary school and turned their nose up, she quickly set them straight.
    “I grew up in a military town and trying to assimilate into an existing group is stressful,” Mayor Robertson said. “Kids would come in and put us down. Most kids would just listen and feel bad. My friend and I were equalizers. We told them if they didn’t like it, go back to where they came from.”

    It was at this mock city council day a year ago that the idea of promoting “Rialto Pride” was initiated. Mayor Robertson said students were starting to ask questions, including why some people weren’t more positive about Rialto.

    “I told them, ‘If you don’t stand up for Rialto, who is going to stand up for Rialto?’ “Mayor Robertson said. “You can lead or you can be led. That’s your choice.”

    She told the students to challenge anyone with a negative image of their city. In turn, the teens put out the hashtag #RialtoPride and it immediately began trending among local students. The conversations started to center around why they love Rialto and a movement was begun.

    For more information about Mayor Deborah Robertson go to: http://www.DeborahRobertson.org.
     
    About Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson

    Deborah Robertson was elected Mayor of Rialto in November 2012 – the latest achievement in a distinguished public service career that has included 12 years on the Rialto City Council, leadership positions at the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG), the San Bernardino Associated Governments (SANBAG), and more than 20 years with the California Department of Transportation.

    Under Mayor Robertson’s leadership, Rialto has gained regional and national recognition for innovation in the areas of public-private partnerships, business development and job creation. The City’s refinancing and restructuring of its water and wastewater operations has become a model for other communities in California, pumping millions of dollars into the local economy.

    Mayor Robertson retired from Caltrans in 2011, as Deputy District Director of External Affairs. A native Californian, she holds an undergraduate degree in Urban Planning from the University of California, San Diego, a Masters Degree in Public Administration from the City University of New York Bernard Baruch College and is a National Urban Fellows recipient. She is also a scholarship recipient and past participant of the Southern California Leadership Network.

    Mayor Robertson has two children and six grandchildren, that are the joy of her life.

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    Time for Norris P Gregory Park

    Norris P. Gregory Jr., 85, the first black council member in the city of San Bernardino, died April 21, 2011. (This is a reporter photograph of a photograph.) (04/28/2011, None / The Press-Enterprise)

      Norris P. Gregory Jr., 85, the first black council member in the  of San Bernardino, died April 21, 2011. (This is a reporter photograph of a photograph.) (04/28/2011, None / The Press-Enterprise)

     
    (San Bernardino, Calif.). There is a nomination for naming the 2.5 acre multi-use park on E Street between 9th and 10th streets, Norris P. Gregory Park.
    The park will be maintained by the San Bernardino Valley Municipal Water District. It will have sitting areas, an outdoor fitness exercise area, playgrounds, picnic areas, basketball court, skateboard area, multi-use field, walkways and splash pad.
    It is being built with a $5 million grant and will be ready for use at the beginning of 2017.  Below is a bullet list of accomplishments for Mr. Gregory who died in 2002.
    Norris Paige Gregory, Jr.
    • He was a resident of San Bernardino from 1958 to his death at the age of 85 in 2011
    • Elected and served as San Bernardino City’s first African American councilman also making him the first African American elected official in San Bernardino County.
    • Served the 6th Ward for 2 terms starting in 1967 to 1975
    • He was a member of the NAACP, the Urban League, the Mexican Chamber of Commerce as well as the VFW and American Legion
    • The San Bernardino and California Teachers Associations and an Honorary Mason.
    • He owned a business up until his death on the Westside.
    • He served with the Redevelopment Agency
    • He was an assistant district administrator for the office of Congressman George E. Brown, Jr.
    • He was a teacher and administrator for San Bernardino City Unified School district
    • He was an activist working for improving the underserved and minorities in San Bernardino
    “I am trying to collect 100 signatures from San Bernardino residents’” said Vera Campbell . “I have an application to fill out and then I turn it in for City Council to approve. I don’t think there is much competition but getting those 100 signatures is proving difficult. I started something that I will see to the end. My phone number is 909-804-1021 if you have suggestions.”

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    Rialto Mayor Robertson Runs for Second Term

     

    Mayor Robertson’s reason for wanting a second term is simple. “I’m not done.”

    In her first term, Mayor Robertson accomplished much of what she wanted. Her focus was on keeping Rialto financially sound, moving forward on commercial and business development, generating jobs in Rialto and enhancing open space for healthy recreational usage.

    In her first term, Mayor Deborah Robertson accomplished much of what she wanted. Her focus was on keeping Rialto financially sound, moving forward on commercial and business development, generating jobs in Rialto and enhancing open space for healthy recreational usage.

    (Rialto, Calif.) As Deborah Robertson moves from table to table greeting folks at Mary Stewart’s Southern Soul Food, the Mayor of Rialto looks as comfortable as if she was in her own kitchen.

    In a way, she is. Mayor Robertson has called Rialto home for nearly 30 years and has served in its local government for 16 years, including three terms as a councilwoman and one as Mayor.
    As she campaigns for re-election – Election Day is Nov. 8 – Mayor Robertson’s reason for wanting a second term is simple. “I’m not done.”

    “I feel the role of the Mayor is a calling, not just a title,” said Mayor Robertson, who is running against current councilmember Ed Palmer. “We keep it real in Rialto. Our foundation is in a common belief of community. We’re middle class, salt of the earth people.”

    In her first term, Mayor Robertson accomplished much of what she wanted. Her focus was on keeping Rialto financially sound, moving forward on commercial and business development, generating jobs in Rialto and enhancing open space for healthy recreational usage.

    “The community as a whole is concerned about safety and lowering crime in the city,” said Mayor Robertson. Cutting down on crime was also a major focus in her first term as Mayor.

    “I am very proud of the part the city’s police force played in response to the terrorist attack nine months ago in San Bernardino,” said Mayor Robertson. Rialto’s SWAT Team was one of the first responders in support of San Bernardino’s units.

    During her time as Mayor, Rialto was also one of the first cities to have its police force wear body cameras. “As the result of a research project, the Rialto police agreed to wear the cameras for one year,” said Mayor Robertson. The results were positive and Rialto decided to keep the cameras. Robertson said it gave citizens a new perspective into law enforcement.

    “It gave us empirical data, not just anecdotal,” Mayor Robertson said. “The number of complaints from citizens went down drastically. It brought about a different level of respect for the police.”
    Statistically, both violent crime and property crime have gone down in each year of Robertson’s first term as Mayor.

    In 2014, Rialto dropped below the national average in violent crime rate for the first time in 12 years, according to City-Data.com. Mayor Robertson is also one of four Mayors in San Bernardino County that have been very vocal about the illegal gun problem.

    For more information about Mayor Deborah Robertson go to: http://www.DeborahRobertson.org.

     

    About Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson
    Deborah Robertson was elected Mayor of Rialto in November 2012 – the latest achievement in a distinguished public service career that has included 12 years on the Rialto City Council, leadership positions at the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG), the San Bernardino Associated Governments (SANBAG), and more than 20 years with the California Department of Transportation.

    Under Mayor Robertson’s leadership, Rialto has gained regional and national recognition for innovation in the areas of public-private partnerships, business development and job creation. The City’s refinancing and restructuring of its water and wastewater operations has become a model for other communities in California, pumping millions of dollars into the local economy.

    A leading voice on regional and national infrastructure issues, Mayor Robertson chairs the Public Health Subcommittee for SCAG’s 2016 Regional Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategy, is a member of the U.S. Conference of Mayors Water Council and Metro Economies, and member of Mayors Against Illegal Guns.

    She is a founding board member for the NFL/AFL Youth Life Skills Camp, has hosted the annual State of Women event in Rialto for the past seven years, and was recognized by Assembly Member Cheryl Brown as 47th District Woman of the Year.

    Mayor Robertson retired from Caltrans in 2012, most recently serving as Deputy District Director of External Affairs. A native Californian, she holds an undergraduate degree in Urban Planning from the University of California, San Diego, a Masters Degree in Public Administration from the City University of New York Bernard Baruch College and is a National Urban Fellows recipient. She is also a scholarship recipient and past participant of the Southern California Leadership Network.

    Mayor Robertson was instrumental in developing Rialto’s Transportation Commission and coordinated a transportation summit for the region.  Her wielding influence and determination have helped bring new businesses and housing to the City of Rialto.

    With all that she has done Mayor Robertson still has the time for family, two children and six grandchildren, that are the joy of her life.

    -end-

    Dameron Communications Wins California Excellence Award

     

    Carl Dameron at a recent award ceremony.

    Carl Dameron, president of Dameron Communications at a recent award ceremony.

     
    Dameron Communications has been selected for the 2016 California Excellence Award amongst all its peers and competitors by the American Economic Institute (AEI).
    “I am honored to receive this prestigious award for a lifetime of work in public relations and advertising,” said Dameron.
    Each year the AEI conducts business surveys and industry research to identify companies that have achieved demonstrable success in their local business environment and industry category. They are recognized as having enhanced the commitment and contribution of small businesses through service to their customers and community. Companies of this caliber enhance the consumer driven stature that California is renowned for.
    Dameron Communications has consistently demonstrated a high regard for upholding business ethics and company values. This recognition by AEI marks a significant achievement as a leader within various competitors and is setting benchmarks that the industry should follow.
    As part of the industry research and business surveys, various sources of information were gathered and analyzed to choose the selected companies in each category. This research is part of an exhaustive process that encapsulates a year long immersion in the business climate of California.
    About AEI
    The AEI is a leading authority on researching, evaluating and recognizing companies across a wide spectrum of industries that meet its stringent standards of excellence. It has spearheaded the idea of independent enterprise and entrepreneurial growth allowing businesses of all sizes to be recognized locally and encouraged globally.
    Particular emphasis is given to meeting and exceeding industry benchmarks for customer service, product quality and ethical practices. Industry leading standards and practices have been developed and implementation of the same has been pioneered by the dedicated efforts of the business community and commerce leadership.
    More information on AEI can be found at www.aefgh.org

    Salvation Army: Resources Needed to Aid Families in Transition

     

    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and also offers evangelical programs for boys, girls and adults. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY or (909) 888-1336.

    Volunteers help serve 52,504 free, hot, nutritious meals were served to the hungry from The Salvation Army in San Bernardino. Now the corps needs help to fund services.

    San Bernardino, Calif. – The Inland Empire branch of the Salvation Army today issued an urgent appeal to the community for resources to provide support to area families in need. The San Bernardino Citadel Corps, which serves Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto and San Bernardino, is reporting a financial deficit of $45,000 (now $90,000), citing a shift in contributions following the December 2 terrorist attack.
    The public is encouraged to donate money, food, and goods and services to help replenish Salvation Army coffers, and to consider including the Salvation Army in their charitable giving and estate plans. Contributions can be made online at www.SalvationArmyUSA.org or by calling 1-800-SAL-ARMY.
    “The Salvation Army is proud to have been a part of the community outpouring of support to the victims and families affected by the December 2 tragedy,” said Anne Metu, program director for the organization’s Transitional Living Center. “Now, we are asking the community to help us rebuild our resources so that we can continue providing assistance to families with urgent needs for food, shelter and child care.”
    Metu cited an example of a family—a mother and her six children, ages 3 to 13—who relied on the Salvation Army Emergency Shelter and Transitional Living Program when evicted from their home: “Mona” and the children’s father had separated and she did not have sufficient income to house, feed and clothe the family.
    After a short stay in the shelter, she found employment and was accepted into transitional housing, but soon lost her job when she could not find childcare during the children’s Spring Break from school. With support from the staff and residents at the Transitional Living Program, Mona was able to return to work and was soon reunited with the children’s father.
    Mona and her husband now live in affordable housing as a family unit and the children continue to participate in Salvation Army youth programs, mentoring other children who are faced with similar life circumstances.
    Since 1887, the San Bernardino Corps has helped residents of the San Bernardino area overcome life’s challenges. Its current service area is San Bernardino, Highland, Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace and Rialto.
    Donations may always be made online at www.SalvationArmyUSA.org, or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY.
    For help or for more information call Ms. Anne Metu, Program Director at the Transitional Living Center, (909) 888-4880 or anne.metu@usw.salvationarmy.org or visit the Website at: www.salvationarmyusa.org
    About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps
    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and also offers evangelical programs for boys, girls and adults. One of the largest, and most effective, charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination.

    -end-

    Time for Summer Cleaning – Send Unwanted Items to the Salvation Army

     The Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Center of San Bernardino always seeks donations of clothes and other household items, both large and small, to supply its seven Family Stores. Money raised by sale of household items at the Family Stores, and of cars and other vehicles at its warehouse, fund the Adult Rehabilitation Center’s drug and alcohol rehabilitation program. To donate, call 1-800 SATRUCK. Photo by Chris Sloan

    The Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Center of San Bernardino always seeks donations of clothes and other household items, both large and small, to supply its seven Family Stores. Money raised by sale of household items at the Family Stores, and of cars and other vehicles at its warehouse, fund the Adult Rehabilitation Center’s drug and alcohol rehabilitation program. To donate, call 1-800 SATRUCK. Photo by Chris Sloan

     
    Patricia Luna, warehouse supervisor, prices clothing donated to the Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Center. The Adult Rehabilitation Center seeks donations of all household items for its seven Family Stores, proceeds of which fund the drug and alcohol rehabilitation program. Photo by Chris Sloan

    Patricia Luna, warehouse supervisor, prices clothing donated to the Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Center. The Adult Rehabilitation Center seeks donations of all household items for its seven Family Stores, proceeds of which fund the drug and alcohol rehabilitation program. Photo by Chris Sloan

     (SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.) Summer has arrived, which means it’s time for summer clean up ! Get rid of unwanted appliances, furniture, clothes and other items easily by calling 1-800 SATRUCK (1-800-728-7825) to arrange for The Salvation Army to pick them up. Or visit our website at www.satruck.org .
    What’s no longer useful to you may be just what a thrift store bargain-shopper falls in love with, or may be exactly what a family needs but can’t afford to buy in a department store.
    “No matter who buys them, donations to the local Salvation Army Family Stores, purveyors of fine used goods, will use the money to help men to overcome drug or alcohol addiction,” said Lt. Regina Verdugo, administrator.
    “We need donations of every kind,” said Jack Katzman, member of San Bernardino’s Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Center Advisory Board. “We receive no other funds, and these days, donations are at an all-time low.”
    “You can donate cars, trucks, boats, clothing, toys, furniture, appliances and even property,” said Katzman.
    The Salvation Army will send a truck to pick up donations from most addresses. The donations can be small or large, as long as they fit into huge the delivery trucks.
    Donors also can bring small items to any of The Salvation Army’s Family Stores, or larger items, such as cars, to the Adult Rehabilitation Center warehouse, which has a location in San Bernardino at 363 S. Doolittle Road.
    San Bernardino’s Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Center operates five Family Stores, in San Bernardino, Fontana, Redlands, Hesperia and Victorville.
    The Family Stores raise almost all of the program’s revenue and teach the rehabilitation center’s residents new job skills, thus helping them become more productive members of society after they complete the program. The beneficiaries learn the value of working hard, cooperating with others and having goals.
    Men in San Bernardino County or Pomona Valley who are seeking help to overcome drug or alcohol addiction should call the Adult Rehabilitation Center in San Bernardino at (909) 889-9605. The Salvation Army offers a similar program for men in Riverside County; for more information about that program, call (951) 940-5790.
    Women who want help ending drug or alcohol addiction can call Adult Rehabilitation Centers for them by calling the center in Anaheim at (714) 758-0414, or the center in San Diego at (619) 239-4037.
    About the Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Center
    The Adult Rehabilitation Center is a six-month social model program, which combines a comprehensive rehabilitation program and work therapy for men who wish to overcome drug or alcohol addiction. These men attend individual and group counseling, substance abuse education, 12-Step meetings, and learn about stress management, anger management, parenting and overcoming addiction, as well as spiritual counseling. Re-entry and alumni supports services are also provided. Many recreational activities are also provided, which alumni can continue after their treatment as part of a sober lifestyle.
    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. To donate, call 1-800 SATRUCK.
     

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    Practicing For Disaster – The Salvation Army SATERN Field Day

    Paul Bennet practices emergency communications at a previous SATERN field day. During the event Ham Radio operators practice to provide the Inland Empire with communications during a disaster.

    Paul Bennet practices emergency communications at a previous SATERN field day. During the event Ham Radio operators practice to provide the Inland Empire with communications during a disaster.

    Yucaipa, Calf. – The Salvation Army Emergency Service Satern Amateur Radio Network Field Day will be June 25-26, beginning at 11 am Saturday and running through 11am. Sunday, at Yucaipa Community Park located at 34900 Oak Glen Road Yucaipa, CA 92399.
    The event is sponsored by the Salvation Army Emergency Service of Riverside and San Bernardino Counties.
    Experienced local amateur radio operators will be at the event to mentor and provide instruction on radio operation in a disaster. Various amateur radio project demonstrations and displays will also be available.
    “Field Day is the most popular on-the-air event held annually in the US and Canada. More than 35,000 radio amateurs gather with their clubs, groups, or simply with friends to operate from remote locations,” said Major Daniel Henderson.
    Field Day is part educational event, part operating event, and part public relations event. The goal is to put together a self-sufficient, working radio stations, quickly and begin making as many contacts as possible in a 24-hour period. The operators simulate emergency conditions, operating portable equipment on emergency power with temporary antennas.
    Often called “ham radio,” the Amateur Radio Service has been around for a century. In that time, it has grown into a worldwide community of licensed operators using the airwaves with every conceivable means of communications technology.
    Ham radio members range in age from youngsters to grandparents. Even rocket scientists and a rock star or two are in the ham ranks. Most, however, are individuals who enjoy learning and being able to transmit voice, data and pictures through the air to unusual places, both near and far, without depending on commercial systems.
    The Amateur Radio frequencies are the last remaining place in the usable radio spectrum where individuals can develop and experiment with wireless communications. Hams not only can make and modify their equipment, but can create whole new ways to do things.
    Amateur radio has been called into action again and again to provide communications in crises when it really matters. Amateur radio people are well known for their communications support in real disaster and post-disaster situations.
    The Salvation Army Emergency Service has been effective in establishing emergency communications nets during floods, hurricanes, fires, earthquakes, and other major disasters.  It’s a way to communicate in an emergency, even with a loss of electricity or cellphone service.
    Whether you are a licensed amateur radio operator or just interested in learning more about amateur radio, come and visit the Salvation Army Satern field operation for ARRL Field Day on June 25 and 26. There is no charge to attend.
    For more information call Contact: Jan Pettit, Field Day Chairman at (951) 487-8118.
     
    About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps
    The Salvation Army provides emergency services including food, lodging for homeless or displaced families, and single women; clothing and furniture; and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) assists rescue workers and evacuees in such disasters as fires.
     
    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and also offers evangelical programs for boys, girls and adults. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY. Our local number is (909) 888-1336.
     

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    Macy’s Partners With The Care Project, Inc. For 11th Annual “Shop For A Cause” Program

     

    “We are honoring local breast cancer survivors. We also honor two women who are positive role models relative to health and wellness,” said breast cancer survivor Carrie Madrid, founder and CEO of Lady Huskies, Inc.

    “We are honoring local breast cancer survivors,” said breast cancer survivor Carrie Madrid, founder and CEO of The Care Project, Inc.

    Macy’s helps local charity raise funds and awareness for breast cancer patients undergoing and recovering from treatment through the national “Shop For A Cause” charity shopping event

    Riverside, Calif.– For the 2nd year, Macy’s is partnering with The CARE Project, Inc. and inviting customers to participate in Macy’s eleventh annual national “Shop For A Cause” charity shopping event, taking place Friday, Aug. 26 through Sunday, Aug. 28, 2016.

    Customers can begin purchasing shopping passes from The CARE Project, Inc. now. Macy’s “Shop For A Cause” is a unique shopping event dedicated to supporting local nonprofit organizations’ fundraising efforts.

    Formerly a one-day initiative, this year Macy’s has extended “Shop For A Cause” to a weekend-long event. Since 2006, the program has helped raise tens of millions of dollars for charities throughout the country, and more than 5,000 charities signed up to participate last year.

    “At Macy’s, we believe in supporting the communities where our customers and associates live and work,” said Holly Thomas, Macy’s group vice president of cause marketing. “That is why we are so proud of Shop For A Cause, which has helped raise tens of millions of dollars for charitable organizations since 2006. With this year’s extension to a weekend-long event, we’re offering even more opportunity to support local and national causes, and thanking our customers with special savings at Macy’s.”

    Macy’s has provided The CARE Project, Inc. with shopping passes to sell for $5 each, and the organization will keep 100 percent of the proceeds for every shopping pass that it sells.

    By purchasing a shopping pass from The CARE Project, Inc. customers support breast cancer patients undergoing and recovering from treatment and can enjoy spectacular discounts at Macy’s stores all weekend long from Friday, Aug. 26 through Sunday, Aug. 28, 2016

    “Our motto at The CARE Project, Inc. is “Never stop caring!”  Help us CARE for others while enjoying this savings pass”, said  The CARE Project, Inc., Carrie Madrid, president.

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