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    Posts Tagged ‘Carl Dameron’

    Builder Tim Garcia Supervises Building of Quality Habitat For Humanity Homes

    At the Hesperia House ribbon cutting in October of this year Habitat for Humanity ReStore Manager Jon Biggs with Hesperia City Council Member Russell "Russ" Blewett and Tim Garcia Habitat for Humanity construction manager

    At the Hesperia House ribbon cutting in October of this year Habitat for Humanity ReStore Manager Jon Biggs with Hesperia City Council Member Russell “Russ” Blewett and Tim Garcia Habitat for Humanity construction manager

     

     (Redlands, CA)  Once upon a time, if a family wanted to build a home, everyone in the community would welcome its new neighbors by pitching in and helping. The home would quickly rise up from the ground, and the grateful new residents of this community would show their gratitude by becoming productive citizens who, in turn, helped other neighbors.

     
    Today, an organization called Habitat for Humanity provides that same kind of help; by organizing community volunteers to help deserving low-income families who as an example make up to $50,950 a year for a family of four build their first home.
     
    It isn’t quite as simple though as it was “once upon a time.” For one thing, in the 21st Century, there are a myriad of law governing how people build houses, and there are permits that must be obtained from several local government agencies. It also takes a great deal of skill and knowledge to put together the type of home in which a modern family would feel comfortable.
     
    To make all of that happen a professional construction manager is essential. At Habitat for Humanity, San Bernardino Area, this construction manager is licensed general contractor Tim Garcia.
     
    “Tim is a professional contractor who is dedicated to his work,” said Dennis Baxter, executive director of the Habitat for Humanity of San Bernardino. “And he is a man who does many good things for his community.”
     
    Garcia has had a relationship with Habitat for Humanity of San Bernardino almost since it began.  This connection started at the First Presbyterian Church of San Bernardino, where Garcia and Habitat for Humanity of San Bernardino chapter founder, San Bernardino Mayor Patrick Morris, both attend.
     
    Mayor Morris started the local Habitat chapter in 1992 after working with one of the international organization’s most famous volunteers, former United States President Jimmy Carter.  At the beginning, the Mayor’s church got on board by sending teams of volunteers to Habitat for Humanity’s building projects.
     
    Two years later, Garcia signed up for one of those teams, and thoroughly enjoyed this service. Not only did he volunteer many times after that, he also served as a member of the Board of Directors from 1999-2001 and as resident from 2001–2002.
     
    He enjoyed his contributions to Habitat for Humanity hence since 2004; Garcia has been a part-time employee of Habitat for Humanity, serving as its construction manager.
     
    “That meant they started paying me for the things I was already doing,” Garcia said. “It is my job to train and supervise all the volunteers, which I had been doing as a volunteer.”
     

    Tim Garcia Habitat for Humanity construction manager

    Tim Garcia Habitat for Humanity construction manager

    Garcia also has a full-time job managing his own business, Inland Construction, which provides remodeling and building services to the general public. He has been a licensed general contractor since 2003, and worked in construction for a decade before.
     
    Habitat for Humanity has thousands of chapters throughout the world, including 15 in southern California. The San Bernardino chapter, established in 1992 by current San Bernardino Mayor Patrick Morris, serves most of San Bernardino County. Its territory extends from Fontana to Yucaipa, and north to the desert and Victor Valley areas.
     
    Garcia is a long time resident of San Bernardino and the son of community leaders and philanthropists Ernie and Dottie Garcia.
     
    All Habitat for Humanity organizations acquire either vacant land or dilapidated homes. From these, Habitat creates quality homes, and provides financial assistance to carefully selected families who will receive these homes when they are complete.  The families contribution includes 500 hours of sweat equity in the Habitat for Humanity projects, pay zero interest and pay monthly mortgages of about $500 to $700 a month.
     
    The adults in these families work with Habitat for Humanity staff and community volunteers to construct the homes, although the projects are managed and supervised by licensed general contractors.  Since it has volunteer labor, and often uses donated supplies, it constructs homes for less cost than typical construction.
     
    The San Bernardino chapter serves San Bernardino County communities between Fontana and Yucaipa, as well as the Mountain Communities of Running Springs, Lake Arrowhead, and Crestline, and the Upper Desert towns of Hesperia, Apple Valley and Victorville.
     
    Habitat for Humanity has plans to build seven homes in San Bernardino and Grand Terrace for families that as an example make up to $50,950 for a family of four.
     
    To donate, volunteer or for more information, go online to www.habitatsb.org, or call Habitat for Humanity at (909) 478-1176.
     
    About Habitat for Humanity San Bernardino Area, Inc.
    Habitat for Humanity San Bernardino Area is the local affiliate of Habitat for Humanity International, a faith-based nonprofit organization that works in partnership with families to strengthen communities and transform lives by building new homes, rehabilitating existing homes, and making affordable home ownership a reality for community members in need.
     
    Habitat for Humanity San Bernardino Area serves San Bernardino County communities between Fontana and Yucaipa, as well as the Mountain Communities of Running Springs, Lake Arrowhead, and Crestline, and the Upper Desert towns of Hesperia, Apple Valley and Victorville.
     
    The Habitat for Humanity ReStore is a deep discounted home improvement store that sells building materials, appliances, home accessories, and furniture.  The ReStore accepts donated goods, which are sold to the general public at a fraction of the retail price.  All proceeds are used to fund the administration and rehabilitation or construction of Habitat for Humanity homes.
     
    To find out more about Habitat for Humanity, call 909-478-1176 or visit www.HabitatSB.org.  We also ask you to LIKE us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/SBReStore.
     

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    Faith Based Committee Connects Others To Habitat For Humanity’s Home Building Mission

    Photo caption 2 Salvation Army:  Reaching out to faith based communities Dr. Kathleen Henry attended the ground breaking for the new Salvation Army Corps location in San Bernardino.  Left to right: Salvation Army Board member Tom Brickley, new Corps leaders Captain Anya Henderson, Major Dan Henderson and Dr. Kathleen Henry.
    Reaching out to faith based communities Dr. Kathleen Henry attended the ground breaking for the new Salvation Army Corps location in San Bernardino. Left to right: Salvation Army Board member Tom Brickley, new Corps leaders Captain Anya Henderson, Major Dan Henderson and Dr. Kathleen Henry.

    (Redlands, CA) Habitat for Humanity of San Bernardino is revitalizing its efforts to work with faith-based organizations, which will help it to provide greater service to the community it serves.
     
    It will bring about these cooperative ventures through the newly renamed Faith Based Committee, which had previously been known as the Church Relations Committee.  This committee reaches out to the faith-based organizations in its community to procure donations of construction supplies, volunteer construction crews, meals and prayers.
     
    “Habitat for Humanity is a Christian organization,” said Dr. Kathleen Henry, one of the directors of the Habitat for Humanity board and a member of the Faith Based Committee.  “The Faith Committee is reaching out to other faith based organizations, to form coalitions that will help with our common goal, which is to provide people with homes.”
     
    Since the committee is newly reorganized, Habitat for Humanity wants to add additional people as soon as possible. From this additional membership, the committee will select a chairperson and other officers soon, and in 2014 begin its community outreach campaign.
     
    “We will meet with other faith-based organizations and find out what their resources and needs are,” Henry said. “They may know people who can help with their expertise, they may know of families in need, or they may know of property owners who want to donate property,” she said.
     

    “We will meet with other faith-based organizations and find out what their resources and needs are,” Habitat for Humanity Faith Committee Chair Kathleen Henry said. “They may know people who can help with their expertise, they may know of families in need, or they may know of property owners who want to donate property,” she said.

    “We will meet with other faith-based organizations and find out what their resources and needs are,” Habitat for Humanity Faith Committee Chair Kathleen Henry said. “They may know people who can help with their expertise, they may know of families in need, or they may know of property owners who want to donate property,” she said.

    The people who want to help may have specific expertise, such as construction or environmental review, or they may simply be volunteers willing to help in any way the organization needs.
     
    The new name better reflects the committee’s purpose, bringing together all faith-based organizations to help with Habitat for Humanity’s goals of eliminating poverty and providing affordable homes.
     
    “The faith community has been an important part of our organization since this chapter was founded in 1992,” said Executive Director Dennis Baxter. “A faith-based committee has for most of this time worked to develop relationships between Habitat for Humanity and other faith-based organizations, but for some reason the committee has not been active in the last six or seven years. Our board now wants to bring this committee back.”
     
    The new name is one that many southern California chapters of Habitat for Humanity use to better reflect the many types of faith-based groups in their cities.
     
    “We have temples, synagogues, mosques and many other types of places where people have faith,” Baxter said. “While Habitat for Humanity is a Christian-based organization, we want to engage with organizations representing all faiths. We all have the same purpose of eliminating poverty and providing low-income housing through home ownership.”
     
    It is an honor to have Dr. Kathleen Henry lead the reorganization of the Faith Based Committee. She is a great organizer with dedication to serving our community.
     
    Dr. Henry’s community contribution includes:  an elected trustee of the San Bernardino Community College District, Member Steering Committee for the Women’s Leadership Council of Arrowhead United Way, Chairperson for the Scholarship Committee of the Highland Woman’s Club, member/past Chair of Youth Services and K-Kids at Kiwanis Club of Highland, and she serves as an Ambassador for the Highland Chamber of Commerce.
     
    Families work with Habitat for Humanity staff and community volunteers to construct the homes, although the projects are managed and supervised by licensed general contractor Tim Garcia.  Since it has volunteer labor, and often uses donated supplies, Habitat for Humanity constructs homes for less cost than typical construction.
    The San Bernardino chapter serves San Bernardino County communities between Fontana and Yucaipa, as well as the Mountain Communities of Running Springs, Lake Arrowhead, and Crestline, and the Upper Desert towns of Hesperia, Apple Valley and Victorville.
     
    The agency currently has plans to build seven homes in San Bernardino and Grand Terrace.  All will be three-bedroom, two-bath homes with attached two-car garages. The homeowners will be able to add their personal touches on these homes by choosing paint colors and carpeting.
     
    To join the Faith Based Committee or for more information, go online to www.habitatsb.org, or call Habitat for Humanity, Executive Director Dennis Baxter at (909) 478-1176.
     
    About Habitat for Humanity San Bernardino Area, Inc.
    Habitat for Humanity San Bernardino Area is the local affiliate of Habitat for Humanity International, a faith-based nonprofit organization that works in partnership with families to strengthen communities and transform lives by building new homes, rehabilitating existing homes, and making affordable home ownership a reality for community members in need.
     
    The Habitat for Humanity ReStore is a deep discounted home improvement store that sells building materials, appliances, home accessories, and furniture.  The ReStore accepts donated goods, which are sold to the general public at a fraction of the retail price.  All proceeds are used to fund the administration and rehabilitation or construction of Habitat for Humanity homes.
     
    To find out more about Habitat for Humanity, call 909-478-1176 or visit www.HabitatSB.org.  We also ask you to LIKE us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/SBReStore.
     

    -end-

    Help The Salvation Army Bring The Joy Of Christmas To A Child

    The faculty and staff at the Loma Linda School of Allied Health Professions were happy to be able to help with the Giving Tree program.  Together they donated more than 100 toys filling the wishes of children in Rialto, Highland, Grand Terrace, Colton, and San Bernardino.  To the left of the presents is Debbie Becker and me Kathy Poss.  To the right is Shirley Sing (kneeling) and Dana McCree.  (photo by Loma Linda School of Allied Health)

    Last year the faculty and staff at the Loma Linda School of Allied Health Professions were happy to be able to help with the Giving Tree program. Together they donated more than 100 toys filling the wishes of children in Rialto, Highland, Grand Terrace, Colton, and San Bernardino. To the left of the presents is Debbie Becker and me Kathy Poss. To the right is Shirley Sing (kneeling) and Dana McCree. (photo by Loma Linda School of Allied Health)

     

    The Salvation Army has helped the needy in San Bernardino since 1887

     
    (SAN BERNARDINO, Calf.) It might seem like a very small gesture in the grand scheme of things, but when the local Salvation Army Corps (www.salvationarmyusa.org), local residents and several businesses join forces to make the holiday season memorable for needy children, it makes a huge difference in so many lives.
     
    The Giving Tree, as a portion of this holiday program is known, revolves around actual Christmas trees, which are set up in local malls the day after Thanksgiving. Giving Tree volunteers match shoppers with the hundreds of children who are relying on The Salvation Army this year to bring them a Merry Christmas.
     
    One of these trees is at Inland Center Mall in San Bernardino. It will help the San Bernardino Citadel Corps provide toys to perhaps hundreds of children in San Bernardino, Highland, Grand Terrace, Colton and Bloomington.
     
    “You can support our Giving Tree by visiting our table in the Inland Center Mall from November 29th to December 24th,” said Major Daniel Henderson, Corps officer for the San Bernardino Salvation Army. “Just pick up a Giving Tree tag and buy a gift corresponding to the tag!
     
    Last year, José Gonzalez was a first time volunteer with The Salvation Army, and chose to help the Giving Tree Program at the Inland Center Mall. “It feels good to be volunteering and collecting toys for kids this Christmas,” said Gonzalez. Gonzalez is also a graduate from The Salvation Army’s six month rehabilitation program, and will soon graduate from its Path To Prosperity transitional living program.
     
    This 18 month program is one of a kind, and assists its participants in obtaining the skills they need to become self-supporting and financially independent after overcoming substance abuse. “The Salvation Army has helped me get my life together,” said Gonzalez.
     
    Shoppers wishing to participate in the Giving Tree will find cards attached to the Giving Tree. These cards include the names and wish lists of needy children whose families cannot afford to buy gifts. Shoppers simply pluck a tag off the Giving Tree and head for the appropriate store to purchase their gift donations. Shoppers keep the card as an ornament to hang on their own Christmas tree, reminding them of their good deed.
     
    Larry Rangal, of Highland, donated two toys to the Giving Tree Program last year. Charity has been an ongoing tradition for Rangal since marrying his wife more than 20 years ago.
     
    “This is one of our little quirks. Now that our kids are grown-up and out of the house, we thought we’d provide toys for other children,” said Rangal. “It makes you feel good too.”
     
    Jill Grace, of Highland, was shopping with 3-year-old Allie Chavez when she noticed the Giving Tree and decided to donate two large bags with about 10 toys. “These children are not asking for much,” said Grace. “What child asks for Monopoly, especially nowadays.”
     
    Grace became involved with The Salvation Army more than a decade ago, during the September 11th tragedy. “I have always been a giving person, and I thought to myself ‘how can I help’,” said Grace. By volunteering with The Salvation Army, Grace was able to provide that help. “Me and my husband helped The Salvation Army serve meals to the workers at Ground Zero,” said Grace.
     
    “This is a great way to start a tradition with your own family, by selecting a gift for a needy child together. The gifts are based on their individual wishes and for some children, it may be the only gift they receive all year,” said Capt. Daniel Henderson of the San Bernardino Corps of The Salvation Army.
     
    “Soccer balls, dolls and clothes are just a few items on each child’s wish list,” said Capt. Henderson. “Shoppers who participate in the program are encouraged to shop for more than what is needed on the list. I can’t think of a better way for business owners and managers to help the community and spread the spirit of Christmas.”
     
    The Salvation Army is looking for other business owners and managers who would like to have a tree at their place of business for employees and/or customers.
     
    To host a Giving Tree in San Bernardino, Colton, Grand Terrace, Rialto, Bloomington or Highland, call (909) 888-1336.
     
    The Riverside Salvation Army has an Angel Program to collect toys for needy kids this Christmas. Toys are collected at The Riverside Salvation Army office located at 3695 1st St., Riverside, CA 92501. To make a donation please call (951) 784-4490, Ext. 100.
     
    The Redlands Salvation Army has Angel Tree tags with the names and wish lists of needy children. Pick-up a tag at The Redlands Salvation Army located at 838 Alta St., Redlands, CA 92374. For more information call, (909) 792-6868.
     
    The Moreno Valley Salvation Army collects toy donations through its Angel Tree program. The Angel Tree is located at the Moreno Valley Mall, 22500 Town Circle Suite 1206, Moreno Valley, CA 92553. Toys are collected until December 22nd, Monday through Friday from 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m., and all day on Saturday. For more information call (951) 653-9131.
     
    The Victor Valley Salvation Army collects toy donations at its office located at 14585 La Paz Drive, Victorville, CA 92395. To make a donation please call (760) 245-2545.
     
    The Ontario Salvation Army collects toys at its office located at 1412 South Euclid Ave., Ontario, CA 91762. To make a donation please call (909) 986-6748.
     
    About The Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps
    The Salvation Army may be able to provide emergency services including food; lodging for homeless or displaced families; clothing and furniture; assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) assists rescue workers and evacuees in such disasters as fires.
     
    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the universal Christian Church, and also offering holistic programs for people of all ages. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. The San Bernardino Corps of The Salvation Army serves Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto, and San Bernardino. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY. Our local number is (909) 888-1336.
     

    -end-

    Keep The Bells Ringing This Holiday Season

    Salvation Army Board member Carl Dameron rings the bells with his family.  Left to right: Malaika, Carl and Shaila.  Photo by Ricard Tomboc

    Salvation Army Board member Carl Dameron rings the bells with his family. Left to right: Malaika, Carl and Shaila. Salvation Army board members ring the bells every year to support the Salvation Army’s mission.  Photo by Ricard Tomboc

    (SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.) The “miracle” of Christmas is repeated over and over again through the joy of caring and sharing. The San Bernardino Salvation Army (www.salvationarmyusa.org) is seeking volunteers to ring bells in Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto, and San Bernardino.
     
    The nationally recognized shiny red kettle is an integral part of the Christmas scene, with millions of dollars donated each year to aid needy families, seniors, and the homeless, in keeping with the spirit of the season.
     
    “This is a wonderful way to help disadvantaged people in our community, simply by volunteering as bell ringers,” said Major Stephen Ball, commander of The Salvation Army of San Bernardino. “We’re looking for individuals, families and groups to spend a day at one of our more than 30 locations in the San Bernardino area.”
     
    The Salvation Army began ringing its bells this year on Friday, Nov. 16th and continues from 10 a.m. through 6 p.m., Monday through Saturday until Christmas Eve.
     
    Anyone who would like to donate a few hours of his or her time can volunteer.  However, a parent or guardian must accompany individuals under the age of 16. Most volunteers ring two hours at a time, but groups are asked to provide ringers who can work in shifts for an entire day.
     
    “The more people who volunteer, the fewer people the agency must hire,” said Major Ball “For each volunteer bell ringer we have, it means more money raised in direct support of our services to those families in need.”
     
    This year, the Sierra del Mar Divisional Headquarters of the Salvation Army has already helped its San Bernardino chapter with a “bell-ringing marathon.” Major Butch Soriano, the divisional finance secretary, came to the Colton Wal-Mart on Tuesday, Dec. 3. From 9 a.m. that day until 6 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 7, he rang the bell for 105 hours straight, raising a total of $2,696.42 for the San Bernardino Corps.
     
    Salvation Army Major Butch Soriano just set a new world record for the longest continuous hand bell-ringing by an individual but fell $7,000 short of his $10,000 goal.

    Salvation Army Major Butch Soriano just set a new world record for the longest continuous hand bell-ringing by an individual but fell $7,000 short of his $10,000 goal.

    The Salvation Army was holding a competition amongst its officers and members to see who could ring the bell the longest. Major Soriano ended his service in a three-way tie for first place, along with another Salvation Army officer in Minnesota and a member in Texas.
     
    Major Soriano not only braved the cooler temperatures and on the final day, rain to serve his division. He also began his service by driving more than 100 miles from his office in San Diego to the San Bernardino Corps headquarters.
     
    The divisional officer said he did it to bring attention to a Salvation Army location that’s doing great things that may not be as highly noticed as what corps in larger cities do.
     
    “There tends to be a lot of focus on the metropolitan areas like San Diego and Los Angeles,” Major Soriano said. “But I know San Bernardino does a lot of great things, so I wanted to bring the public awareness of them.”
     
    Where does the money raised by Major Soriano and the hundreds of others ringing bells in San Bernardino go? For Christmas, the Salvation Army creates holiday food baskets for more than 600 local families. On Christmas Day, The Salvation Army of San Bernardino hosts a Christmas Dinner that historically provides a beautiful meal to 300 people. Donations raised by bell ringers help make this possible.
     
    “The San Bernardino Corps also needs food every day for those at its Hospitality House transitional shelter,” said Major Ball.  Up to 75 family members stay in its transitional and emergency family shelters.
     
    The Salvation Army also needs food daily for up to 200 people who receive a free dinner served six nights a week. Approximately 40,000 meals are served annually from the Army’s kitchen located at 746 W. 5th Street in San Bernardino.
     
    Feeding the hungry is just one of the ways money donated to The Salvation Army helps. The Salvation Army also helps provide emergency services including food; lodging for homeless or displaced families; clothing and furniture; assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) assists rescue workers and evacuees in such disasters as fires.
     
    To volunteer as a bell ringer in Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto, and San Bernardino, call The Salvation Army at (909) 888-1336.
     
    In addition, one may donate to The Salvation Army online, through the website www.salvationarmyusa.org. Donors may specify to which branch of The Salvation Army the money should be sent.
     
    How the Bell Ringer campaign began:
    Captain Joseph McFee, serving with the San Francisco Salvation Army Corps in 1891, wanted to serve Christmas dinner to the poor in his neighborhood. But he didn’t have money to do so.
     
    As a sailor in Liverpool, England, Captain Mcfee saw people on the docks throw money into a large kettle called “Simpson’s Pot” to help the poor. He decided this might work in California too.
     
    Captain Mcfee set up a kettle at the Oakland Ferry Landing, which operated a ferry that was, in those days, the only way across San Francisco Bay. He put a sign on the kettle saying, “Keep the Pot Boiling” and raised enough money to serve the Christmas dinner.
     
    His idea spread quickly, and by 1897 Salvation Army Corps nationwide were collecting money in kettles to serve the needy in their communities. Among the Salvation Army Corps collecting money this way before the turn of the Twentieth Century was The Salvation Army of San Bernardino, which formed in 1887.
     
    About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps
    The Salvation Army may be able to provide emergency services including food; lodging for homeless or displaced families; clothing and furniture; assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) assists rescue workers and evacuees in such disasters as fires.
     
    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and also offers holistic programs for individuals of all. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. The San Bernardino Corps of The Salvation Army serves Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto, and San Bernardino. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY. Our local number is (909) 888-1336.
    For more info, check www.abovegroundfun.com.
     

    African-American Students RAP Their Way to Excellence In Moreno Valley Elementary Schools

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    Project Moving Forward, backed by a $1.9 million federal grant, improved academic scores in two local schools.  African American students at Hendrick Ranch Elementary School achieved impressive academic gains, where Academic Performance Index or API scores jumped 51 points

     
    (Moreno Valley, CA)  Students in two Moreno Valley elementary schools have become top academic achievers through a simple concept: learning vocabulary the RAP way!
     
    Short for Rehearse, Analyze and Produce, RAP is based on 12 years of research by Dr. Linda Ventriglia-Navarrette, a Harvard educated researcher and professor at National University.
     
    Hendrick Ranch and Armada Elementary schools posted the highest academic scores in their history, becoming the top two achieving elementary schools in 2013 among 23 in the Moreno Valley Unified School District. Both schools are located in low-income neighborhoods where academic achievement has suffered.
     
    African American students at Hendrick Ranch Elementary School achieved impressive academic gains, where Academic Performance Index or API scores jumped 51 points while improvement was up 49 points at Armada.  Hispanic students also made significant increases, moving from far below basic skills to proficiency in reading and math.
     
    Based on the recent results, Hendrick Ranch was the only school in the District to achieve the state Academic Performance Index and Annual Yearly Progress scores.  Armada was the only school where over 90 percent socially disadvantaged students achieved an academic performance index of 700.  Hendrick Ranch achieved a 796 ranking.
     
    How did they do it?  By adopting a vocabulary instructional program called RAP, or the Rule of three.  Armed with a $1.9 million federal grant funded by the U.S. Department of Education, the District created a partnership with National University where teachers learned how to increase student’s academic achievement through vocabulary instruction.
     
    The program provided 60 hours of teacher training and coaching, using the Rule of 3 or RAP as ways to teach words across the curriculum.
     
    Research shows that improving academic vocabulary has the highest correlation with success in school.
     
    Other educators agree.  E.D. Hirsch, a widely known academic researcher, says, “The achievement gap between Black and White, rich and poor is not due to lack of money.  It largely comes down to a vocabulary gap, because words name things.”  Hirsch found that poor children have a massive vocabulary deficit that today’s U.S. education system does not address.
     
    In the RAP program, students rehearse words by clicking out, spelling and saying the letters of the words, including focused conversations about the words.  They teach vocabulary words to a partner.  Students also analyze word structures and produce their own individual meanings for words in their Power Word books.
     
    Many teachers at Hendrik and Armada elementary schools reported that the RAP program was popular with students.  They enjoyed learning new words, which became an exciting part of the school day.
     
    Robert Gordon, who was principal of Hendrick Ranch said, “These vocabulary development strategies made a significant difference in students’ achievements.”
     
    Armada principal Jeff Jones said, “Armada’s teachers improved the delivery of consistent, effective and engaging instructional strategies that addressed the critical areas of vocabulary development and reading comprehension.”
     
    At the district, the performance results were well received.  “We are extremely proud of our students at Hendrick and Armada,” said Dr. Judy White, Superintendent of Schools in Moreno Valley.  “This program demonstrates how students in economically disadvantaged areas can achieve remarkable academic results by focusing on their learning styles.  It captures how students learn.”
     
    For more information on the Moreno Valley Unified School District’s call the District office at (951) 571-7500 or go to the website at MVUSD.net.
     
     
    About the Moreno Valley Unified School District
    Moreno Valley Unified School District, with 3,400 employees and 35,000 students.
     
    Moreno Valley Unified School District’s mission is to prepare all students academically and socially to become productive members of society.
     

    -end-

     

     

    LaSalle Adds Fresno To Medicare Coverage In Central Valley

    LaSalles-Medical-Asscoaites

    (Fresno, CA)  LaSalle Medical Associates Inc. grows in the Central Valley announcing a new contract with Care 1st to serve as its Medicare healthcare provider in Fresno County.
     
    LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc. is an Independent Practice Association (IPA) of independently contracted doctors, hospitals and clinics, delivering high quality patient care to approximately 150,000 people in Fresno, Kings, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, Madera, Tulare, Los Angeles, Riverside, and San Bernardino Counties.
     
    “Care 1st has tapped in to LaSalle’s long standing service presence in the Central Valley to help them serve Medicare patients.  LaSalle is already delivering a full range of medical insurance products including and Medicare in a number of other counties in California,” said Carl Maier, executive vice president of LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc.
     
    LaSalle Medical Associates is one of the largest independent minority owned healthcare companies in California. LaSalle also accepts Anthem Blue Cross, Molina, Care 1st, Health Net and Inland Empire Health Plan (IEHP) in 9 California counties.
     
    “Many people think of LaSalle as a medical provider for children’s services.  They are very surprised to know we deliver services to children, adults, seniors and people with disabilities.  Many of the people we serve today already have Medicare or will get Medicare shortly because of their disabilities,” said Maier.
     
    “LaSalle currently serves Medi-Cal and Medicare patients in the Central Valley, we are in active negotiations to bring more products to counties we serve,” said Maier
     
    “I am honored to have more Doctors to help serve the thousands of patients who have placed their trust in our network of primary physicians and healthcare professionals in California,” said Dr. Albert Arteaga founder and Chief Executive officer of LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc.
     
    LaSalle plans to continue to grow and serve low-income people and welcomes the new Affordable Health Care Act some times called Obama Care.
     
    “As a large provider of service to government sponsored health care programs we understand what the state’s implementation of the Affordable Health Care Act and expansion of Medi-Cal means here in California.  A lot of uninsured people with a high demand for service are going to be coming to doctors, clinics and hospitals in 2014,” said Dr. Arteaga.
     
    “Our mission continues and LaSalle is preparing to welcome 1 million new low-income patients in the nine counties we serve.  We are recruiting more health care professionals to increase our ability to provide more health care to more patients.  Why?  Everyone deserves high quality health care delivered with dignity and respect regardless of ethnicity or income,” said Dr. Arteaga.
     
    For more information about LaSalle Medical Associates, call (909) 890-0407 or go on line to LaSalleMedical.com.
     

    -end-

    New Beginnings – Salvation Army Announces New officers and New location

    Breaking Ground on the new Pacific Street Corps:  left to right: Salvation Army Advisory Boardmember Kristine Scott, Field Representative for San Bernardino County Supervisor James Ramos, John Futch, Bill Leman, San Bernardino Mayor Patrick Morris, Salvation Army Advisory Boardmember Brian Cronin, Lt. Kathleen Griffins, new Corps Officer Capt. Anaya Henderson, new Corps Officer Major Dan Henderson, Division Commander Major Lee Lescano, San Bernardino Valley Community College District Trustee Dr. Kathleen (Katy) Henry, Salvation Army Advisory Boardmember Jack Katzman, California State Assemblymember Cheryl Brown, Salvation Army Advisory Boardmember, Tom Brickley.

    Breaking Ground on the new Pacific Street Corps: left to right: Salvation Army Advisory Boardmember Kristine Scott, Field Representative for San Bernardino County Supervisor James Ramos, John Futch, Bill Leman, San Bernardino Mayor Patrick Morris, Salvation Army Advisory Boardmember Brian Cronin, Lt. Kathleen Griffins, new Corps Officer Capt. Anaya Henderson, new Corps Officer Major Dan Henderson, Division Commander Major Lee Lescano, San Bernardino Valley Community College District Trustee Dr. Kathleen (Katy) Henry, Salvation Army Advisory Boardmember Jack Katzman, California State Assemblymember Cheryl Brown, Salvation Army Advisory Boardmember, Tom Brickley.

     


    (San Bernardino, CA)  “This city is in desperate need of the services The Salvation Army provides,” San Bernardino Mayor Patrick Morris told the hundred people gathered for the ground breaking of a new center on October 10, 2013.
     
    The Salvation Army is remodeling a former school at 2626 E. Pacific Avenue in Highland with a vision of expanding youth programs, daily meals, spiritual support for program graduates, worship services and other life-enriching programs to help the San Bernardino area.
     
    The Army will continue its many services in the downtown San Bernardino area to those in need at its other locations:  the Transitional Living Center, Family Emergency Lodge and Path to Prosperity. Meals, food distribution and other services for those in need will continue out of the center at 746 5th until the new center opens then will move to 925 W. 10th Street.
     
    The many civic leaders who presented certificates of appreciation to The Salvation Army conveyed a remarkably wide and deep knowledge of the work and mission of The Salvation Army.  Each, from Assemblymember Cheryl Brown, Mayor Pat Morris, and the offices of Councilmember Wendy McCammack,  U.S .Congressmember Gary Miller, Senator Bill Emmerson, Assemblymember  Mike Morrell, County Supervisor James Ramos,  San Bernardino Valley Community College District Trustee Dr. Kathleen (Katy) Henry and other entities, expressed gratitude for the thousands of good citizens who are graduates of Salvation Army programs, and who are now giving back, contributing to the community and even helping restore other lives.
     

    Carl M. Dameron master of ceremonies  and Salvation Army board member and David Morgan field representative for California State Senator Bill Emmerson

    Carl M. Dameron master of ceremonies and Salvation Army board member and David Morgan field representative for California State Senator Bill Emmerson

    Many speakers thanked and praised retired Majors Russell and Jacque Fritz and former Corps leaders Majors Steve and Nancy Ball for the important work they had done.
     
    Salvation Army Divisional Commander Major Lee Lescano thanked the San Bernardino Advisory Board, led by Mr. Tom Brickley, for their diligent work and tireless energy leading, the community and the Army to this point.  He also welcomed and formally presented the new San Bernardino Citadel Corps Administrators and Pastors Officers Major Daniel Henderson and Captain Anya Henderson, the administrators and pastors for the Army’s work in San Bernardino.
     
    “We are passionate and excited to be part of the revitalization of our community,” says Major Daniel Henderson, Salvation Army San Bernardino Administrator, Pastor and Corps Officer. “We see potential everywhere and believe a bright future is ahead of us.  Changed people change communities!”
     
    California Assemblymember Cheryl Brown presents a certificate to Major Dan Anderson new Corps member for the San Bernardino area office.

    California Assemblymember Cheryl Brown presents a certificate to Major Dan Anderson new Corps member for the San Bernardino area office.

    Since 1887, The Salvation Army in San Bernardino has helped those in need overcome life’s challenges. Its current service area is San Bernardino, Highland, Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace and Rialto.
     
    California Assemblymember Cheryl Brown presents a certificate to Captain Anya Henderson new Corps member for the San Bernardino area office.

    California Assemblymember Cheryl Brown presents a certificate to Captain Anya Henderson new Corps member for the San Bernardino area office.

    For more information call (909) 888-1336.
     
    About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps
    The Salvation Army may be able to provide emergency services including food; lodging for homeless or displaced families; clothing and furniture; assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) assists rescue workers and evacuees in such disasters as fires.
     
    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and also offers evangelical programs for boys, girls and adults. One of the most effective charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1878 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination.
     
    The San Bernardino Corps of The Salvation Army serves Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto, and San Bernardino. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY.  Donations should reference the San Bernardino Corps.  Our local number is (909) 888-1336.

     -end-

     

    Habitat For Humanity Moves Family Into New Home In Hesperia

    “We are looking forward to owning a home that my children can grow up in; a home that is for us, with no problems. We are very thankful and truly appreciative to partner with Habitat for Humanity!” said Steven Espinoza.

    “We are looking forward to owning a home that my children can grow up in; a home that is for us, with no problems. We are very thankful and truly appreciative to partner with Habitat for Humanity!” said Steven Espinoza.

     

    (Redlands, CA)  The Ribbon Cutting and Dedication, of Habitat for Humanity’s, San Bernardino Area’s newest home in the high desert city of Hesperia is Sunday, October 13th from 2:00 to 5:00 pm.
     
    “After we cut the ribbon, the Espinoza family will move into their new home,” said Dennis Baxter, executive director for Habitat for Humanity.
     
    Chase Bank donated the one-story 1,600 square foot home with three bedrooms and two bathrooms and San Manuel Band of Mission Indians funded the $30,000 rehabilitation of the home.
     
    Steven and Jessica currently live in Colton in a small house that they share with relatives. The house is overcrowded, poorly insulated with no heating, and the septic system is inadequate to handle the number of residents in the house.
     
    Steven and Jessica are the parents of two children, son age 6 and daughter age 2. The Espinoza family is so excited about the prospect of owning their own home.  Jessica spends some of her sweat equity hours in the Habitat ReStore!
     
    “We are looking forward to owning a home that my children can grow up in; a home that is for us, with no problems. We are very thankful and truly appreciative to partner with Habitat for Humanity!” said Steven Espinoza.
     
    “The house is a great fit for the four-member Espinoza family.  It sits on a half-acre lot great for the kids to play and to entertain family and friends.  The front yard is a low maintenance, xeriscape with 150 sq. ft. of grass for the kids to play on,” said Baxter.
     
    The Mission of Habitat for Humanity is to eliminate substandard, poverty housing. “We plan to achieve this mission by providing decent, affordable housing for low-income families by bringing together the necessary volunteers, experienced help, suppliers, city and government agencies, and families to form partnerships in an atmosphere of God’s love for all people,” said Baxter.
     
    Since the affiliate was incorporated in 1992, Habitat for Humanity has built or rehabilitated 25 homes in Redlands, San Bernardino, Fontana, Loma Linda, Colton, Yucaipa, Highland and now Hesperia, delivering housing for more than 100 people.
     
    Habitat for Humanity is not a giveaway program. Selected local families who receive homes must:

    • Contribute 500 hours of sweat equity by participating in the actual construction of their own house and other Habitat projects
    • Pay closing costs
    • Pay a monthly payment of combined mortgage, taxes, and insurance payments, on an interest free loan over 20 – 30 years

     
    For more information or if you would like to attend the Hesperia House Dedication please call Habitat for Humanity San Bernardino Area at (909) 478-1176.
     
    About Habitat for Humanity San Bernardino Area, Inc.
    Habitat for Humanity San Bernardino Area is the local affiliate of Habitat for Humanity International, a faith-based nonprofit organization that works in partnership with families to strengthen communities and transform lives by building new homes, rehabilitating existing homes, and making affordable home ownership a reality for community members in need.
     
    The San Bernardino Area affiliate serves the communities of Redlands, Loma Linda, Fontana, San Bernardino, Highland, Yucaipa, Colton, Bloomington, Rialto, Grand Terrace, Mentone, Running Springs, Lake Arrowhead, Hesperia, Apple Valley and Victorville.
     
    The Habitat for Humanity ReStore is a deep discounted home improvement store that sells building materials, appliances, home accessories, and furniture.  The ReStore accepts donated goods, which are sold to the general public at a fraction of the retail price.  All proceeds are used to fund the administration and rehabilitation or construction of Habitat for Humanity homes.
     
    To find out more about Habitat for Humanity, call 909-478-1176 or visit www.HabitatSB.org. In the next post will share with the site I used to buy my gazebo.  We also ask you to LIKE us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/SBReStore.
     

    -end-

    Creating an Advertising Campaign That WORKS – Ad Development

     (San Bernardino, CA)  “We are all products. Remember that. As an advertising and public relations creative director, my product is problem solving, knowledge and creativity,” said Carl M. Dameron creative director and founder of Dameron Communications.
     
    “I am going to tell you how to develop an advertising and public relations program to effectively reach your target market, create a positive image of a business in the community and entice the market to buy more of your products, goods and/or services,” said Dameron.
     
    This series has been going for several weeks.  Go to the website for the entire backlog at
    at DameronCommunications.com/blog

    Layout 1
    This January 2012 ad uses the campaign theme for the Magnolia at Highland – “Affordable Luxury”.  We also target seniors by saying, “For ages 62 and better”.  The campaign was very successful. The senior apartments have 100+ person waiting list.

     
    Ad development
    This is where your research bears fruit. Take the information obtained through your research that tells you who your customer is, what they like, and what they like about your products and services to develop a campaign theme to reach your target market.
     
    This theme must translate well into print, radio, television, your website, billboards, Email, social networks, and direct mail to grab the target’s attention and leave the right impression. If you need help to develop your ads use: and ad agency, freelance artists, university students or talk to your newspaper or radio representative.
     
    You can also call Dameron Communications to help you develop your plan.
     
     
    Campaign goal
    We know the goal is to increase sales and profit:

    • But of what product ?   You want to include all of them but really pick one.
    • Of what service?  Again I know, you want to include all of them, but again pick one.
    • Where is it?  Where are your locations or do you come to me?
    • When do customers want to buy your stuff? — Winter, spring, summer or fall?

     
    Start by reviewing your sales and promote your most popular product or the thing you are known for.
     
    80 percent of your business comes from 20 percent of your customers.  Define who the 20 percent are, what they want and create your campaign to go after more people like them!
     
    For Argosy University they are highly recognized for their Postgraduate degrees in Psychology, Education and Business, that’s their 20 percent.  So our goal was to increase enrollment in those programs.  They also have bachelors degree completion programs and other offerings.
     
     
    Slogans – “Campaigns that work!”  That’s the Dameron Communications slogan
     
    How do you start?  Try creating a quick five-second description of what you do that makes your customer feel better good about buying your product.  Then massage it into a slogan.
     
    Here are some examples.
     

    • For SpeakerCraft we created the slogan “The Art of Sound”.  They sell speakers and high-end stereo equipment.  Not just things to make music, but things to make music sound exceptionally great.

     

    • For the San Bernardino County Department of Public Health AIDS program the slogan was “Know your Status”.  We show multiethnic real people and ask the question: “Are you HIV Positive of Negative?”
    HIV/AIDS Bus Shelter
    Are you HIV Positive of Negative?  Do you know?  You should know.  Take control.  Get checked for free at the San Bernardino County Health Department.

     

    • For The Magnolia at Highland the slogan is “Affordable Luxury”.   This project is a low income senior citizen complex, however it is designed and built like a luxury resort.  So we sold it that way.   We used the images reserved for luxury spas and luxury resorts, people in the pool, the cabañas and the beautiful entry.  Instead of 62 and older we came up with 62 and Better.

     

    The Magnolia at Highlands Senior Citizen Apartments Grand Opening invitation created for Western Seniors Housing
    The Magnolia at Highland Senior Citizen Apartments’ Grand Opening invitation created for Western Seniors Housing.  It clearly shows the luxury features available in the Senior Apartments.
    • For Argosy University it’s “Education that Works.”  This slogan has multiple meanings.  Not only does the education help you be a better person, but the reason many people get a post-graduate degree is to get a better job and make more money, so having a degree from Argosy helps to get you more work.  The other issue with Universities new to the area is the question of trust. We included the line “quality Education for over 30 years in Psychology, Education and Business” to demonstrate that Argosy was not a new University, just new to the area.  This line is to solidify the brand and increase trust.  The campaign increase enrollment 450 percent and made the campus the fastest growing start up the history of 22 campus system.
    • Yes, it does sound like our slogan.  Argosy abandoned it and so we picked it up.  Waste not, want not.
    Education That Works was the Slogan we created for Argosy University
    “Education That Works” was the slogan we created for Argosy University. This is the billboard we created, we also created newspaper ads, plus magazine and radio commercials.

    Good luck, and remember the target for your slogan is your customers, not you!
     
    To Be Effective In Advertising, Plan And Be Consistent.

    Display your slogan everywhere. This is the email signature for Dameron Communications

     
    DC Email art_DC has Moved correct
    Read more
    For a free one-hour consultation call Carl M. Dameron at (909) 534-9500.
    For a free copy of “Effective Advertising & Public Relations” click here to download: DC-701 Effective advertising-legal 51211.
    Effective Advertising & Public Relation prints on legal paper

    Caring For Medi-Cal Patients For More Than 29 Years

    LaSalle Medical Associates celebrates 29 years of service with 160,000 patients

     

    (SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.)  In June 1984 Dr. Albert Arteaga and Maria his wife, a nurse started their medical practice not just to heal the sick and injured, but to change patients’ perception of “going to the doctor.”
     
    Dr. Arteaga explains, “I want everyone to feel that going to the doctor is no more intimidating than going to the grocery store.”
     
    The Arteaga’s also built their practice on the belief that “everyone deserves high quality health care”.  Everyone also deserves to be treated by their doctor with “dignity and respect regardless of ethnicity or income”.
     
    That philosophy has been successful.  On the first day of his practice Dr. Albert Arteaga and Maria saw two patients at their clinic at 17577 Arrow Boulevard in Fontana.  Now LaSalle Medical Associates cares for 160,000 patients across nine counties in California.
     
    Success came quickly as word spread of caring doctors that also accepted Medi-Cal and affordable cash payments.
     
    By 1992 the Fontana location grew and LaSalle had added clinics in Hesperia and two in San Bernardino

    On the first day, owner Dr. Albert Arteaga and his wife Maria then employed as his nurse and still his chief assistant saw two patients at their clinic in Fontana. Today, LaSalle Medical Associates has grown to four clinics and 120 employees, and an Independent Practice Association (IPA) serving more than 1,900 doctors.

     
    To run the growing business the Arteaga’s opened a corporate office in San Bernardino at 685 Carnegie Drive, Suite 230.
     
    The Arteaga’s started an Independent Practice Association or IPA in 1995 in response to changes in health care created by government and insurance companies.  The insurance companies prefer to negotiate for health care services and compensation with groups of physicians rather than individual doctors.
     
    LaSalle Medical Associates accepted the challenge and has grown to a network of 1,900 independently contracted doctors, hospitals and clinics, delivering high quality patient care.  Now LaSalle Medical Associates is one of the largest independent minority owned healthcare companies in California.
     
    LaSalle has a team of 120 healthcare professionals at LaSalle’s four clinics in San Bernardino County.  Through its IPA 1,900 independently contracted doctors, hospitals and clinics, deliver high quality patient care in Riverside, San Bernardino, Los Angeles, Stanislaus, Fresno, Kings, Tulare, San Joaquin and Madera counties.
     
    “I think 29 years shows we have been doing good things for our patients and employees and we have been doing it for a long time,” Dr. Arteaga said.  He added, “It proves two things. Number One, we are honest.  Number two we are reliable.  We aren’t here today and gone tomorrow.  In the medical field, being solid means being reputable and reliable.”
     
    In 29 years of business the Arteaga’s have seen good times and bad, recession and boom, and several business challenges.  Through it all Dr. Arteaga has strived not only to be a great physician, but also a good businessman.
     
    “Treating patients with dignity and respect is not only the right thing to do, it is also a good business practice, it has built us a solid, loyal patient base,” said Dr. Arteaga.
     
    Those patents in turn recommended LaSalle Medical Associates to their friends and family.  Some of who now have chosen LaSalle for their health care needs for three generations.
     
    “It’s not usual for us to see the second generation of children we started treated 29 years ago,” said Maria Arteaga.  “We are honored to be trusted with the lives of our patients and their children.”
     

    The LaSalle Medical Associates Healthcare team gave more than 10,000 flu vaccines last year. LaSalle is getting ready for this years flu season. Left to right: Dr. Joseph V. Selvarj, Dr. Albert Arteaga, Dr. Cheryl Emoto, and Dr. Felix A. Albano.
     
    The new flu season starts September 1, 2013 with flu vaccines available at all LaSalle clinics. LaSalle has the Fluzone High Dose vaccine for seniors, the intradermal flu vaccine is a shot that is injected into the skin instead of the muscle, and nasal flu mists for children and adults. Photo by: Chris Sloan

     
    The Arteaga’s have also focused on keeping expenses low and service quality high.  And they have helped many patients who might otherwise struggle to pay for even basic medical care to find insurance that will pay the bill.
    Since Dr. Arteaga’s specialty is pediatrics, La Salle Medical Associates initially focused on serving children of the lower income and disabled. Dr. Arteaga quickly realized there were even greater community needs.
     
    With his guidance, LaSalle expanded its service to include family and internal medicine, and obstetrics/gynecology. All stemming from the Arteaga’s “obligation” to “help whenever we can.”
     
    Public and professional recognition has not escaped LaSalle Medical Associates and The Arteaga’s.
     
    In 2012 Dr. Albert Arteaga, became California’s first-ever CDC Childhood Immunization Champion and one of only 39 across the country receiving the prestigious honor.
     

    The California Medical Association awarded him the “Ethnic Physician’s Leadership Award,” recognizing his contributions to medical care in the Latino community. He also was named one of the top 15 Latino-owned businesses in the Inland Empire by Hispanic Lifestyle magazine. 

     
    Dr. Arteaga was awarded the San Bernardino County Medical Society’s Merlin Hendrickson M.D. Award for his outstanding contribution to the community.
     
    Inland Empire Health Plan selected LaSalle’s clinics as Riverside and San Bernardino counties’ best healthcare provider, while the African American Health Initiative selected LaSalle as a “model provider” of Black healthcare in San Bernardino County.
     
    The San Bernardino Board of Supervisors has presented Dr. Arteaga a Resolution for his outstanding community efforts, and the Inland Empire Health Plan awarded LaSalle Medical Associates a Proclamation Award in appreciation of outstanding community work and for being the state’s number one enroller of the Healthy Families program, an insurance plan for children of low-to middle-income families.
     
    What does the future hold?
     
    “As a large provider of service to Medi-Cal patients we understand what the state’s implementation of the Affordable Care Act and expansion of Medi-Cal means here in California.  A lot of uninsured people with a high demand for service are going to be coming to doctors, clinics and hospitals in 2014.  LaSalle is preparing to welcome those one million new low income patients in the nine counties we serve,” said Dr. Arteaga.
     
    He added, “We are recruiting more health care professionals to increase our ability to provide more health care to more patients at the rate Medi-Cal pays”.
     
    LaSalle has also created new partnerships to fund expansion and is contracting with more cost effective service providers with larger service areas for lab work, x-rays, imaging and supplies, and expanded their billing and payment capabilities. More info please visit homeinsurance-companies.com.

    Dr. Albert Arteaga. The California Medical Association awarded him the “Ethnic Physician’s Leadership Award,” recognizing his contributions to medical care in the Latino community. He also was named one of the top 15 Latino-owned businesses in the Inland Empire by Hispanic Lifestyle magazine.

    For the Arteaga’s success is defined by service to those in need of medical services.  By any measure LaSalle Medical Associates patient growth is a testimony to their service to their communities.  Not bad for a couple of idealist who wanted not just to heal the sick and injured, but to change patients’ perception of “going to the doctor.”
     
    For more information about LaSalle Medical Associates, call (909) 890-0407 or go on line to LaSalleMedical.com.
     

    -end-

     

    LaSalle-PR-213.4 Anniversary
    For More information call
    Carl M. Dameron@ (909) 534-9500