×
  • Categories
  • Click For Articles

    Posts Tagged ‘rialto’

    The Salvation Army Needs Toys and Turkeys

     

    Help the Salvation Army obtain more toys for children in need by going to the Giving Tree by Dec. 24.

    Please help the Salvation Army obtain more toys and turkeys for children and families in need this Holiday Season. Donations can always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY.

    (Redlands, Calif.) The Salvation Army of San Bernardino is in need of frozen turkeys for our Christmas food distribution on December 20th to families in need who have signed up for Christmas assistance.

    “Please bring your donation of frozen Turkeys to either our Redlands location at: 838 Alta Street or our Hospitality House located at: 925 W. 10th St., San Bernardino,” said Major Martha Trimmer, Corps Officer of The Salvation Army of San Bernardino.

    To sign up for food for your family please apply in person at The Salvation Army 838 Alta Street in Redlands.

    “We can help with toys for your dependent children from birth to 12 years old please bring with you your, ID, proof of dependent children in the household i.e.; birth certificate, social security card, or insurance card, and proof of residence such as a utility bill,” said Major Martha Trimmer, Corps Officer of The Salvation Army of San Bernardino.

    Majors Kyle and Martha Trimmer, Corps Officer of The Salvation Army of San Bernardino host The Salvation Army of San Bernardino’s Red Kettle Kick Off on Wednesday November 17, 2021at 6:00 PM., at the Bear Springs Events Center in Highland.

    Majors Kyle and Martha Trimmer, Corps Officer of The Salvation Army of San Bernardino host The Salvation Army of San Bernardino’s Red Kettle Kick Off on Wednesday November 17, 2021at 6:00 PM., at the Bear Springs Events Center in Highland.

    “We can also help your entire family with food”, she added.

    Monetary donations can be mailed to P.O Box 26, Redlands, CA 92373. Donations can always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY.

    -end-

    About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps

    The Salvation Army may provide emergency services including food; lodging for homeless or displaced families; clothing and furniture; assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) assists rescue workers and evacuees in such disasters as fires.

    Serving: San Bernardino, Redlands, Highlands, Rialto, Loma Linda, Colton, Yucaipa, Calimesa, Bloomington, Mentone, Grand Terrace, Muscoy, and the mountain communities.

    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and offers evangelical programs for boys, girls, and adults. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1885, supporting those in need without discrimination. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY. Our local number is (909) 888-1336.

    One Small Christmas Gift Gives Hope To A Child at the Salvation Army Angel Tree

    Help the Salvation Army obtain more toys for children in need by going to the Giving Tree by Dec. 24.

    Help the Salvation Army obtain more toys for children in need by going to the Giving Tree by Dec. 24.

     

    (Redlands, Calif.)  Giving a toy to a needy child. It is a small gesture but participating in The Salvation Army’s Angel Tree will make this Christmas memorable for you as well as the children in need.  Without your help, some children won’t get anything for Christmas.

    “Just pick up an Angel Tree tag and buy a needy child the gift listed on the tag! The Angel Tree matches donors with hundreds of children who are relying on The Salvation Army this year to bring them a Merry Christmas,” said Major Martha Trimmer, Corps Officer of The Salvation Army of San Bernardino.

    The San Bernardino Corps Angel Tree is at Inland Center Mall in San Bernardino, 500 Inland Center Drive in San Bernardino, 92408.  Donations received here provide toys to children from 400 disadvantaged families in Big Bear, Blue Jay, Crestline, Lake Arrowhead, the mountain communities, Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto, Loma Linda, Yucaipa, Mentone, Redlands, and San Bernardino.

    “Please support disadvantaged children with a Christmas gift at the Angel Tree by visiting our table in the Inland Center Mall and fulfilling the wishes of a child till December 22nd,” said Major Trimmer.

    Shoppers find cards attached to the Angel Tree. These cards include the names and wish lists of needy children whose families cannot afford to buy gifts. Shoppers simply pluck a tag off the Angel Tree and head for the appropriate store to purchase their gift donations, then return it to the Angel Tree volunteers.

    Shoppers get to keep the card as an ornament to hang on their own Christmas tree, reminding them of their good deed.

    “This is a great way to start a tradition with your family, by selecting a gift for a needy child together. The gifts are based on their individual wishes and for some children, it may be the only gift they receive all year,” said Major Trimmer.

    “Lego’s, board games and clothes are just a few items on each child’s wish list,” said Major Trimmer. “Shoppers who participate in the program are encouraged to shop for more than what is needed on the list. I can’t think of a better way for local people including business owners and managers to help the community and spread the spirit of Christmas.”

    For more information on the Angel Tree call Steven Pinckney at (909) 792-6868 or visit the tree in the Inland Center Mall in San Bernardino.   To donate money by phone call 1-800-SAL-ARMY (800-725-2769).  Donate online at: https://sanbernardino.salvationarmy.org

     

    -end-

     

    About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps

    The Salvation Army may provide emergency services including food; lodging for homeless or displaced families; clothing and furniture; assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) assists rescue workers and evacuees in such disasters as fires.

     

    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and offers evangelical programs for boys, girls, and adults. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1885, supporting those in need without discrimination. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY. Our local number is (909) 888-1336.

    Safety First for Students and Teachers


    by Sean Flynn
    Inland Empire residents know from painful experience that America faces an unacceptable level of gun violence. Whether at a workplace in San Bernardino a high school in Palmdale, or in Santa Fe, Texas, far more needs to be done to prevent these tragedies.

    As we discuss our options, I would like to point out that there are at least five common-sense solutions that can be enacted immediately to help safeguard students and schools from a repeat of the tragedy in Palmdale.  You have probably never heard of them because the political parties have gone to polar extremes and are more interested in finger pointing than proven solutions.

    Our fundamental problem is that students and schools have been left defenseless.  It wasn’t always like that. When I was growing up in the 1980s and attending junior high and high school in the gang-plagued Los Angeles Unified School District, we had metal detectors to stop students from bringing weapons (both knives and guns) onto campus.  It worked and metal detectors are something that we now as a society embrace at airports, concerts, and government buildings.

    We need to place metal detectors in schools once again. Nobody should be able to walk casually onto campus with a firearm and shoot children.

    Let’s also embrace more recent prevention technologies.  Consider the Salto electronic door locks that the Loma Linda Unified School District just installed at every one of its schools.

    Each principal in the district now has a mobile app that allows them to lock down their entire campus in just eight seconds if there’s an emergency.  Some might object to the $1.4 million cost, but this proven technology comes out to just 8 cents per student per day. That’s a bargain by any measure, especially so when considering how infinitely precious our children are.

    Another proven lifesaver is the ShotSpotter acoustical gunshot detection and location system, which uses ordinary microphones to detect and locate gunfire.  Within seconds, it can detect that firearms have been discharged, tell authorities the location to within 10 feet, and even tell them if there was more than one shooter.

    ShotSpotter is used by more than 90 cities around the world and is credited by the San Francisco Chief of Police with helping to reduce both gun crime and homicides by fifty percent over the past 10 years. We need ShotSpotter at every school in America and in the neighborhoods that surround them.

    Fences and metal detectors are the first line of defense.  ShotSpotter lets authorities know when something has gone wrong.  And Salto allows for instant lockdown.  But we must also have trained professionals on site at every school ready to engage and disable if a shooter manages to get past the fences and metal detectors.

    So I once again recommend proven solutions. The schools I attended back in the 1980s had armed police officers patrolling the halls and walking the perimeter. They were some of the nicest adults I ever met, but their purpose was simple and meaningful: If anyone tried to harm me, they would stop them…dead if necessary.

    Society, of course, also needs to seriously reconsider how it deals with the violently mentally ill and to have a serious talk about the best ways of restricting potential predators from gaining access to firearms.  Both of those debates will be heated, but both sides should consider a new type of restraining order that can deny firearms to potential shooters.

    It’s called a Gun Violence Restraining Order (GVRO) and it allows family members and others who are close to a disturbed individual to present real evidence—such as screen shots of social media posts or copies of diary entries—to a local judge who can then issue a 21-day restraining order that allows the police to temporarily deny weapons to the disturbed individual.

    California’s GVRO law went into effect in 2018, but California is one of just five states to allow for GVROs.  Other states should consider adopting GVROs and citizens should be made aware that GVROs are an important option for those living with potential predators.

    The best fence is the one that’s never breached, the best metal detector is the one that’s never set off, and the best Salto system is the one that’s never activated.  But until we can 100% deny weapons to the violently mentally ill, we need all of them, as well as ShotSpotters, school police, and GVROs.  They are proven, practical, cost effective and would make another Palmdale much less likely.  I hope we implement each of them as soon as possible.  Our children must be protected.

    I live in Redlands.  I am a recognized economist, business owner, educator,and Board member on the San Bernardino County Employees’ Retirement Association.   I am also the author of the best-selling book  Economics for Dummiesand the coauthor of the world’s best-selling college textbook, Economics: Principles, Problems, and Policies.

    For more information on my campaign, Sean Flynn for Congress, go to www.SeanFlynnForCongress.com

    Congressional Reps. Cook, Royce, Calvert, and Walters Endorse Flynn For Congress

    Congressional Representatives Paul Cook (CA-08), Ed Royce (CA-39), Ken Calvert (CA-42), and Mimi Walters (CA-45) are endorsing Sean Flynn in his run for California’s 31st Congressional District.

    Flynn corrals the area’s top Republican endorsements including: Morrell, Hagman, Lovingood, and Rutherford for his bid to win a spot in the 31stcongressional race on Tuesday, June 5.

    RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIF. – Congressional Representatives Paul Cook (CA-08), Ed Royce (CA-39), Ken Calvert (CA-42), and Mimi Walters (CA-45) are endorsing Sean Flynn in his run for California’s 31st Congressional District.

    “I’m truly honored to win the endorsements of these outstanding United States Representatives,” said Flynn. He added, “California is blessed to have great Republican leaders who fight for more high-paying jobs and work diligently on behalf of veterans. I look forward to serving with them in Washington as part of a regional congressional coalition.”

    “My top priority is jobs. We are going to create more jobs in California and our Nation by becoming business friendly.  We are going to grow our small businesses, our medium sized businesses and our big businesses.  We are going to cut the useless red tape that stifles business growth and empower American businesses to create more and better JOBS,” said Flynn.

    Flynn has secured additional major endorsements from: State Senator Mike Morrell; San Bernardino County Supervisors Curt Hagman, Robert Lovingood, and Janice Rutherford.

    The National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) names Sean Flynn as one of its “On the Radar” status as part of the NRCC’s highly selective “Young Guns” program. These candidates have met a series of rigorous goals and surpassed program benchmarks to establish a clear path to victory, ensuring that CA-31 is a battleground district in 2018.

    Flynn gained national attention as the best-selling author of Economics for Dummies now in its third edition. He is also coauthor along with Campbell McConnell and Stanley Brue of the world’s best-selling college textbook, Economics: Principles, Problems, and Policies.

    Flynn is a recognized economist, business owner, the Chair of Economics Department at Scripts College in Claremont, and Board member on the San Bernardino County Employees’ Retirement Association (SBCERA).
    An avid martial arts enthusiast Flynn is a former U.S. National Aikido Forms Champion and has coached four of his students to U.S. national aikido titles.

    Congressman Paul Cook represents San Bernardino County, and serves on the House Armed Services Committee, Foreign Affairs Committee, and Natural Resources Committee. Cook is a retired Colonel in the United States Marine Corps.

    Congressman Ed Royce represents parts of Los Angeles, Orange, and San Bernardino counties, and is the Chairman of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs.

    Congressman Ken Calvert is a small business owner representing Riverside County. Calvert serves on the House Appropriations Committee.

    Congresswoman Mimi Walters represents Orange County and serves on both the House Judiciary Committee as well as the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.

    Flynn is running for the 31st Congressional District representing all or portions of Upland, Rancho Cucamonga, Fontana, San Bernardino, Highland, Redlands, Loma Linda, Grand Terrace, Colton, and Rialto.
    The primary election is on Tuesday, June 5, 2018 with the top two vote recipients advancing to the General Election on Tuesday, November 6, 2018.

    For more information on the Flynn campaign go to www.SeanFlynnforCongress.com
    For an absentee ballot or to find your polling place go to: The San Bernardino County Registrar of Voters at sbcountyelections.com.  You can also call (800) 881-VOTE (8683) or (909) 387-8300.

    -end-

    How Many Stamps Does My Mail In Ballot Need?


    Mail in ballots were sent out on May 9th., and rumors say voters must add two stamps to their ballots.

    Ialand Empire, CALIF.- People who vote by mail are accustomed to using one stamp to send in their ballots, but there’s a rumor circulating that this June the ballot is larger than usual, and that extra weight requires an additional stamp.

    Mail in ballots were sent out by the San Bernardino Registrar of Voters on Wednesday, May 9th, and will start arriving as early as May 10th, so knowing what to do is important.

    “We checked with the San Bernardino Registrar of Voters, and according to their office each ballot will have instructions that will let you know if you need to use one or two stamps,” said Flynn, candidate for the 31st Congressional District.

    He added, “Of course to be sure, you can always use two stamps.”

    “I encourage every vote by mail constituent to review the issues and candidates carefully, then complete their ballot early, and mail it to the San Bernardino Registrar of Voters office,” said Flynn.
    If you have questions about the voting process or the location of your polling place go to: The San Bernardino County Registrar of Votersat SBCountyElections.com. You can also call (800) 881-VOTE (8683) or (909) 387-8300.

    Sean Flynn is running for the 31st Congressional District representing all or portions of Upland, Rancho Cucamonga, Fontana, San Bernardino, Highland, Redlands, Loma Linda, Grand Terrace, Colton, and Rialto.
    The primary election is on Tuesday, June 5, with the top two vote recipients advancing to the General Election on Tuesday, November 6.

    For more information on Sean Flynn for Congress go to www.SeanFlynnForCongress.com

    -end-

    Flynn, Ahmed and Aguilar to Meet at Congressional Candidates Forum


    Inland Empire, Calif.  The Inland Empire Tax Payer’s Association host the first Congressional Candidates Forum for the 31st District moderated by local news reporter and KCAA Radio’s Joe Lyons. Candidates Republican Sean Flynn and Democrat Kaiser Ahmed have confirmed their attendance.  As of this writing Democrat Pete Agular is invited but has not confirmed his attendance.
    The forum is Wednesday, May 30thfrom 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.in Rancho Cucamonga at the Lions East Community Center, 9191 Baseline Road.
    “The goal of the candidate’s forum is to give voters an opportunity to hear the positions of each candidate and ask them questions. Come ready with your questions,” said Lyons.
     

    -end-

    Congressional Candidate Sean Flynn Learns from Small Businesses Owners

    While touring at Kelley Space in San Bernardino, Sean Flynn candidate for the 31st Congressional District looks at the machines cylinder used in pulley systems that helps electricians perform their job more safely.

    While touring at Kelley Space in San Bernardino, Sean Flynn candidate for the 31st Congressional District looks at the machines cylinder used in pulley systems that helps electricians perform their job more safely. Flynn toured 31st district businesses to learn more about their companies and what they need from government. Sean Flynn is on the left and in the front right is Mike Gallo Presdient of Kelly Space.

     

    “The same issues came up repeatedly: overregulation, high healthcare costs, tax reform, high workers compensation rates, and burdensome, confusing labor laws that add cost and hurt worker  productivity,” said Flynn.

    Rancho Cucamonga, CALIF.- Economist, jobs expert, academic, and congressional candidate Sean Flynn had a busy week meeting with local small business owners during National Small Business Weekto learn about the needs of businesses in the area and how our government can serve them better.

    “California does not have a business-friendly environment, which is why it is so important for me to hear from small business owners who are working hard to run successful companies in San Bernardino County.  We are going to work together to find solutions to the problems that confront them daily,” said Flynn, candidate for the 31st Congressional District.

    Small businesses make up a large part of the economy. According to the Small Business Association (SBA) more than half of Americans either own or work for a small business, and these businesses create about two out of every three new jobs in the U.S. each year.

    “I recently met with San Bernardino County small business owners. We talked about their concerns about our current business environment, and the major issues that are impacting them,” said Flynn. “The same issues came up repeatedly: high healthcare costs, overregulation, tax reform, high workers compensation rates, and burdensome, confusing labor laws that add cost and hurt productivity.”

    Business leaders joining the discussion included: Denny Shorett owner of Crown Connect, a 40 year old printing company in San Bernardino, Fontana’s California Recyclersowner Cristina Valle-Parke, California Financial Plannersowner Rich Crean from San Bernardino, and Account Executive M’liss Silva with City News Group, which has six publications in the Inland Empire.

    Flynn toured 31st district businesses to learn more about their companies and what they need from government.

    Sean Flynn candidate for the 31st Congressional District Cristina Valle-Parke, owner of California Recyclers in Fontana. Flynn toured 31st district businesses to learn more about their companies and what they need from government.

    Flynn also sponsored a free jobs workshop in Rancho Cucamonga. The workshop helped local high school and college students create job winning resumes, fill out job applications that will make them stand out from their competitors, and practice successful interview skills.

    The jobs workshop was lead by Karina Anderson from Employment Means Success, a local nonprofit dedicated to finding qualified people jobs. Flynn is a co-founder of the non-profit and is vice president of the board of directors.

    In addition to these events, Flynn visited local businesses. He toured California Recyclersin Fontana, Valley Resource Center’s San Bernardino County branch in Fontana, Flamingo Palms Cuban Cafeserving Caribbean Cuisine in Rancho Cucamonga, Angel Jewelersin Rancho Cucamonga, and local chopped salad franchise Chop Stop, owned by Kelley Choi in Rancho Cucamonga.

    The tours continued with Flynn touring Kelly Spaceand Technology with President Mike Gallo, and Technical Employment Trainingin San Bernardino, which provides manufacturing trades education and hands-on machinist skills training to prepare students for National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) credentials.

    At each stop, Flynn got to sit down and talk with the owners about the issues they face while doing business in San Bernardino County.

    “This is just part of my meetings with local business owners.  It was exciting to celebrate Small Business Week, and I will continue to stay connected with business owners small, medium and large.  I celebrate the successes of local businesses and support them daily,” said Flynn.

    Sean Flynn is running for the 31st Congressional District representing all or portions of Upland, Rancho Cucamonga, Fontana, San Bernardino, Highland, Redlands, Loma Linda, Grand Terrace, Colton, and Rialto.
    Flynn gained national attention as the best-selling author of Economics for Dummies. He is also coauthor of the world’s best-selling college textbook, Economics: Principles, Problems, and Policies.  An avid martial arts enthusiast, Flynn is also a former U.S. National Aikido Forms Champion and has coached five of his students to U.S. National Aikido titles.

    The primary election is on Tuesday, June 5, with the top two vote recipients advancing to the General Election on Tuesday, November 6.

    For more information on the Flynn campaign go towww.SeanFlynnForCongress.com
    To find your polling place go to: The San Bernardino County Registrar of Voters.  You can also call (800) 881-VOTE (8683) or (909) 387-8300.

    -end- 

     

    Rialto Mayor Robertson – Why I Run

    Mayor Robertson, Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson,

    Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson, said. “When I took office, my goals were to stabilize our financial future, improve the economic and business development in Rialto, create greater job opportunities, hire the local workforce and make Rialto a safe place to live, work and play.”

    (Rialto, Calif.)  Newly retired, Deborah Robertson drove around Rialto and quickly decided what she would do with all that “free time.” She put all her efforts in running for mayor.

    Four years later and one term as mayor, Mayor Robertson is still working to keep Rialto moving in the right direction. During her first term, which began in 2012, economic opportunities went up while crime went down. Her collaboration with neighboring cities along the Interstate 10 corridor will result in better traffic flow, even as more industrial jobs take root in the area.

    “I feel the role of mayor is a calling, not just a title,” said Mayor Robertson, who was a three-term city councilwoman before her first term as mayor. “When I took office, my goals were to stabilize our financial future, improve the economic and business development in Rialto, create greater job opportunities, hire the local workforce and make Rialto a safe place to live, work and play.”

    “Today, our businesses are on the rise, a greater number of residents are part of the local workforce, crime statistics are down and we as a community have made a tremendous commitment to improving our streets and roads.”

    In working on the needs of the city, Mayor Robertson leaned on her vast experience. A native Californian, Mayor Robertson holds an undergraduate degree in Urban Planning and a master’s degree in Public Administration. Before retiring, she was the Deputy District Director of External Affairs for the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans).

    Partnering with the cities of Fontana, Colton and San Bernardino, the focus has been on economic development and the creation of jobs in the fields of technology, transportation along with commercial endeavors.

    “A major accomplishment has been attracting businesses to this city and the surrounding communities,” Mayor Robertson said. “We focus on where we are (geographically). The footprint has been cast. Anything that goes from the ports to the rest of the United States – 90 percent of it has to pass through the Inland Empire. We need to see the technology of moving goods and make sure the skill sets for these jobs are transferred into our community so our people are competitive.”

    The biggest project for the city is the Renaissance at the north end of Rialto, formerly Rialto Airport. Through legislation, the city was able to redirect aviation activity to San Bernardino International Airport (Formerly Norton Air Force Base). More than 1,500 acres are being redeveloped into housing, commercial, industrial and entertainment areas, also bringing tax revenue and jobs.

    “Rialto is the jewel of the Inland Empire,” Mayor Robertson said. “I have a plan and I want to continue to execute the plan to move Rialto forward.”

    For more information about Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson go to: http://www.DeborahRobertson.org.

    About Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson

    Deborah Robertson was elected Mayor of Rialto in November 2012 – the latest achievement in a distinguished public service career that has included 12 years on the Rialto City Council, leadership positions at the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG), the San Bernardino Associated Governments (SANBAG), and more than 20 years with the California Department of Transportation.

    Under Mayor Robertson’s leadership, Rialto has gained regional and national recognition for innovation in the areas of public-private partnerships, business development and job creation. The City’s refinancing and restructuring of its water and wastewater operations has become a model for other communities in California, pumping millions of dollars into the local economy.

    Mayor Robertson retired from Caltrans in 2011, as Deputy District Director of External Affairs. A native Californian, she holds an undergraduate degree in Urban Planning from the University of California, San Diego, a Masters Degree in Public Administration from the City University of New York Bernard Baruch College and is a National Urban Fellows recipient. She is also a scholarship recipient and past participant of the Southern California Leadership Network.

    Mayor Robertson has two children and six grandchildren, that are the joy of her life.

    -end-

    Rialto Mayor Robertson #RialtoPride

     

    Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson told the students to challenge anyone with a negative image of their city. In turn, the teens put out the hashtag #RialtoPride and it immediately began trending among local students. The conversations started to center around why they love Rialto and a movement was begun.

    Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson told the students to challenge anyone with a negative image of their city. In turn, the teens put out the hashtag #RialtoPride and it immediately began trending among local students. The conversations started to center around why they love Rialto and a movement was begun.

    (Rialto, Calif.) She is not from the generation that made Twitter-speak common, but Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson certainly knows her way around a hashtag.

    High schoolers and young voters have taken Mayor Robertson’s re-election slogan of #RialtoPride and soon it morphed it into a new nickname for the incumbent mayor — #MayorGetItDoneRobertson.
    Mayor Robertson is running for her second term as mayor, and fifth term in Rialto city government. Election Day is November 8. She is also Rialto’s first Black Mayor.

    Mayor Robertson chuckled about the name given to her originally by some Rialto High School students after spending the day with her during a mock city council. It shows that beyond economic development and crime statistics, Mayor Robertson – a nearly 30-year resident – has a deep-rooted pride in her city.

    “I feel the negative images of cities are often portrayed in TV shows such as ‘Cops,’ “Mayor Robertson said. “Often you see a negative image, yet crime continues to decrease in Rialto. But negatives get the program ratings.”

    Mayor Robertson pointed out that in the past five years, violent crime in Rialto has steadily declined and according to city-data.com, Rialto fell below the national average in 2014 and crime continues to drop. Rialto now ranks among the top half in safest communities in San Bernardino County, city-data.com also shows. The unemployment rate in Rialto has steadily dropped since 2013, according to homefact.com and the rate is now at seven percent.

    Raised in a military community in San Diego, Mayor Robertson said she learned civic pride at an early age. When new kids came to her elementary school and turned their nose up, she quickly set them straight.
    “I grew up in a military town and trying to assimilate into an existing group is stressful,” Mayor Robertson said. “Kids would come in and put us down. Most kids would just listen and feel bad. My friend and I were equalizers. We told them if they didn’t like it, go back to where they came from.”

    It was at this mock city council day a year ago that the idea of promoting “Rialto Pride” was initiated. Mayor Robertson said students were starting to ask questions, including why some people weren’t more positive about Rialto.

    “I told them, ‘If you don’t stand up for Rialto, who is going to stand up for Rialto?’ “Mayor Robertson said. “You can lead or you can be led. That’s your choice.”

    She told the students to challenge anyone with a negative image of their city. In turn, the teens put out the hashtag #RialtoPride and it immediately began trending among local students. The conversations started to center around why they love Rialto and a movement was begun.

    For more information about Mayor Deborah Robertson go to: http://www.DeborahRobertson.org.
     
    About Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson

    Deborah Robertson was elected Mayor of Rialto in November 2012 – the latest achievement in a distinguished public service career that has included 12 years on the Rialto City Council, leadership positions at the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG), the San Bernardino Associated Governments (SANBAG), and more than 20 years with the California Department of Transportation.

    Under Mayor Robertson’s leadership, Rialto has gained regional and national recognition for innovation in the areas of public-private partnerships, business development and job creation. The City’s refinancing and restructuring of its water and wastewater operations has become a model for other communities in California, pumping millions of dollars into the local economy.

    Mayor Robertson retired from Caltrans in 2011, as Deputy District Director of External Affairs. A native Californian, she holds an undergraduate degree in Urban Planning from the University of California, San Diego, a Masters Degree in Public Administration from the City University of New York Bernard Baruch College and is a National Urban Fellows recipient. She is also a scholarship recipient and past participant of the Southern California Leadership Network.

    Mayor Robertson has two children and six grandchildren, that are the joy of her life.

    -end-

     

    Rialto Mayor Robertson Runs for Second Term

     

    Mayor Robertson’s reason for wanting a second term is simple. “I’m not done.”

    In her first term, Mayor Robertson accomplished much of what she wanted. Her focus was on keeping Rialto financially sound, moving forward on commercial and business development, generating jobs in Rialto and enhancing open space for healthy recreational usage.

    In her first term, Mayor Deborah Robertson accomplished much of what she wanted. Her focus was on keeping Rialto financially sound, moving forward on commercial and business development, generating jobs in Rialto and enhancing open space for healthy recreational usage.

    (Rialto, Calif.) As Deborah Robertson moves from table to table greeting folks at Mary Stewart’s Southern Soul Food, the Mayor of Rialto looks as comfortable as if she was in her own kitchen.

    In a way, she is. Mayor Robertson has called Rialto home for nearly 30 years and has served in its local government for 16 years, including three terms as a councilwoman and one as Mayor.
    As she campaigns for re-election – Election Day is Nov. 8 – Mayor Robertson’s reason for wanting a second term is simple. “I’m not done.”

    “I feel the role of the Mayor is a calling, not just a title,” said Mayor Robertson, who is running against current councilmember Ed Palmer. “We keep it real in Rialto. Our foundation is in a common belief of community. We’re middle class, salt of the earth people.”

    In her first term, Mayor Robertson accomplished much of what she wanted. Her focus was on keeping Rialto financially sound, moving forward on commercial and business development, generating jobs in Rialto and enhancing open space for healthy recreational usage.

    “The community as a whole is concerned about safety and lowering crime in the city,” said Mayor Robertson. Cutting down on crime was also a major focus in her first term as Mayor.

    “I am very proud of the part the city’s police force played in response to the terrorist attack nine months ago in San Bernardino,” said Mayor Robertson. Rialto’s SWAT Team was one of the first responders in support of San Bernardino’s units.

    During her time as Mayor, Rialto was also one of the first cities to have its police force wear body cameras. “As the result of a research project, the Rialto police agreed to wear the cameras for one year,” said Mayor Robertson. The results were positive and Rialto decided to keep the cameras. Robertson said it gave citizens a new perspective into law enforcement.

    “It gave us empirical data, not just anecdotal,” Mayor Robertson said. “The number of complaints from citizens went down drastically. It brought about a different level of respect for the police.”
    Statistically, both violent crime and property crime have gone down in each year of Robertson’s first term as Mayor.

    In 2014, Rialto dropped below the national average in violent crime rate for the first time in 12 years, according to City-Data.com. Mayor Robertson is also one of four Mayors in San Bernardino County that have been very vocal about the illegal gun problem.

    For more information about Mayor Deborah Robertson go to: http://www.DeborahRobertson.org.

     

    About Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson
    Deborah Robertson was elected Mayor of Rialto in November 2012 – the latest achievement in a distinguished public service career that has included 12 years on the Rialto City Council, leadership positions at the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG), the San Bernardino Associated Governments (SANBAG), and more than 20 years with the California Department of Transportation.

    Under Mayor Robertson’s leadership, Rialto has gained regional and national recognition for innovation in the areas of public-private partnerships, business development and job creation. The City’s refinancing and restructuring of its water and wastewater operations has become a model for other communities in California, pumping millions of dollars into the local economy.

    A leading voice on regional and national infrastructure issues, Mayor Robertson chairs the Public Health Subcommittee for SCAG’s 2016 Regional Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategy, is a member of the U.S. Conference of Mayors Water Council and Metro Economies, and member of Mayors Against Illegal Guns.

    She is a founding board member for the NFL/AFL Youth Life Skills Camp, has hosted the annual State of Women event in Rialto for the past seven years, and was recognized by Assembly Member Cheryl Brown as 47th District Woman of the Year.

    Mayor Robertson retired from Caltrans in 2012, most recently serving as Deputy District Director of External Affairs. A native Californian, she holds an undergraduate degree in Urban Planning from the University of California, San Diego, a Masters Degree in Public Administration from the City University of New York Bernard Baruch College and is a National Urban Fellows recipient. She is also a scholarship recipient and past participant of the Southern California Leadership Network.

    Mayor Robertson was instrumental in developing Rialto’s Transportation Commission and coordinated a transportation summit for the region.  Her wielding influence and determination have helped bring new businesses and housing to the City of Rialto.

    With all that she has done Mayor Robertson still has the time for family, two children and six grandchildren, that are the joy of her life.

    -end-