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    Help The Salvation Army Give Homeless and Needy Children Christmas Presents

    Help The Salvation Army Give Homeless and Needy Children Christmas Presents

    Help The Salvation Army Give Homeless and Needy Children Christmas Presents

    “Please support disadvantaged children with a Christmas gift at the Angel Tree by visiting our table in the Inland Center Mall and fulfilling the wishes of a child till December 22nd,” said Major Braga.

     

    (Redlands, Calif.)  Giving a toy to a needy child. It is a small gesture but participating in The Salvation Army’s Angel Tree will make this Christmas memorable for you as well as the children in need.  Without your help, some children won’t get anything for Christmas.

    “Just pick up an Angel Tree tag and buy a needy child the gift listed on the tag! The Angel Tree matches donors with hundreds of children who are relying on The Salvation Army this year to bring them a Merry Christmas,” said Major Adelma Braga, Corps Officer of The Salvation Army of San Bernardino.

    The San Bernardino Corps Angel Tree is at Inland Center Mall in San Bernardino, 500 Inland Center Drive in San Bernardino, 92408.  Donations received here provide toys to children from 400 disadvantaged families in Big Bear, Blue Jay, Crestline, Lake Arrowhead, the mountain communities, Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto, Loma Linda, Yucaipa, Mentone, Redlands, and San Bernardino.

    “Please support disadvantaged children with a Christmas gift at the Angel Tree by visiting our table in the Inland Center Mall and fulfilling the wishes of a child till December 22nd,” said Major Issas Braga.

    Shoppers find cards attached to the Angel Tree. These cards include the names and wish lists of needy children whose families cannot afford to buy gifts. Shoppers simply pluck a tag off the Angel Tree and head for the appropriate store to purchase their gift donations, then return it to the Angel Tree volunteers.

    Shoppers get to keep the card as an ornament to hang on their own Christmas tree, reminding them of their good deeds.

    “This is a great way to start a tradition with your family, by selecting a gift for a needy child together. The gifts are based on their wishes and for some children, it may be the only gift they receive all year,” said Major Braga.

    “Bicycles, board games, and clothes are just a few items on each child’s wish list,” said Major Braga. “Shoppers who participate in the program are encouraged to shop for more than what is needed on the list. I can’t think of a better way for local people including business owners and managers to help the community and spread the spirit of Christmas.”

    For more information on the Angel Tree call Steven Pinckney or visit the tree in the Inland Center Mall in San Bernardino.   Donors are asked to drop off turkeys, hams, canned food, cash, checks, or gift cards at the Salvation Army’s Corps Office at 838 Alta Street, Redlands, 92373. For more information call (909) 792-6868.

    To donate money by phone call 1-800-SAL-ARMY (800-725-2769).  Donate online at: https://sanbernardino.salvationarmy.org

    About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps

    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church and offers holistic programs for individuals of all. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world.

    The Salvation Army has served San Bernardino since 1888.  The Salvation Army supports those in need without discrimination.  The Salvation Army serves the cities of Big Bear, Blue Jay, Crestline, Lake Arrowhead, other mountain communities, Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto, Loma Linda, Yucaipa, Mentone, Redlands, and San Bernardino.

    LaSalle Medical Observes World AIDS Day

    Photo Caption: “HIV screening is as easy as a simple blood test with highly accurate results typically available in less than a week,” says Dr. Andrew Benin, M.D.About LaSalle Medical Associates

    Photo Caption: “HIV screening is as easy as a simple blood test with highly accurate results typically available in less than a week,” says Dr. Andrew Benin, M.D.

    “The development of pre-exposure preventive care or PrEP is highly effective in decreasing transmission of HIV in high-risk populations such as intravenous drug users and members of the homosexual/bisexual community,” says Dr. Andrew Benin.

    REDLANDS, CALIF. –—LaSalle Medical Associates joins the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and many other organizations to celebrate the advances that have been made in the treatment and prevention of AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome), the disease caused by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV).

    The CDC points out that World AIDS Day is an opportunity for people worldwide to unite in the fight against HIV, to show support for people living with HIV, and to commemorate the over 32 million people who have died from an AIDS-related illness.

    Since its beginning in 1988, World AIDS Day has brought together agencies of the United Nations and the United States, as well as scores of healthcare organizations and medical societies worldwide to unite in addressing specific themes related to HIV. UNAIDS has announced the theme for 2023 is “Let Communities Lead.”

    UNAIDS says, “Communities connect people with person-centered public health services, build trust, innovate, monitor implementation of policies and services, and hold providers accountable….it is a call to action to enable and support communities in their leadership roles. World AIDS Day 2023 will highlight that to unleash the full potential of community leadership to enable the end of AIDS.”

    While there is no cure for HIV, with proper medical care, it can be controlled. NBA superstar Magic Johnson is a famous example. The disease apparently jumped from chimpanzees to humans as long ago as the late 1880s and has infected Americans since “at least the mid to late 1970s,” according to the CDC.

    The only way to know if you have HIV is to get tested, and that’s where LaSalle Medical Associates comes in. LaSalle’s Dr. Andrew Benin says, “Much has changed in the treatment and prevention of HIV infection in the last 10 years. Screening is as easy as a simple blood test with highly accurate results typically available in less than a week.

    “More importantly, the development of pre-exposure preventive care or PrEP is highly effective in decreasing transmission of HIV in high-risk populations such as intravenous drug users and members of the homosexual/bisexual community.”

    Possible signs of an HIV infection include flu-like symptoms (sore throat, fever, night sweats, swollen lymph nodes, mouth ulcers, chills, rash, fatigue, and achy muscles) starting two to four weeks after infection that may last anywhere from a few days to several weeks. But some people show no symptoms; that’s why LaSalle says the only way to know for sure is to get tested.

    Because HIV is so contagious, at-risk individuals must get tested regularly to prevent the spread of the disease.

    HIV.gov points out that “HIV can affect anyone regardless of sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, gender, age, or where they live. However, certain groups of people in the United States are more likely to get HIV than others because of particular factors, including the communities in which they live, what subpopulations they belong to, and their risk behaviors.

    “In the United States, gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men are the population most affected by HIV. According to the CDC, of the 30,635 new HIV diagnoses in the U.S. in 2020, 68% (20,758) were among gay and bisexual men. By race/ethnicity, Blacks/African Americans and Hispanics/Latinos are disproportionately affected by HIV.

    “…Also, transgender women who have sex with men are among the groups at highest risk….People who inject drugs remain at significant risk for getting HIV as well.” Risky behaviors include anal or vaginal sex or sharing needles with an HIV-positive partner.

    Using condoms can prevent infection, as can taking pre-exposure medicine, which needs to be prescribed by one’s doctor. “People with HIV who take HIV medicine (called antiretroviral therapy or ART) as prescribed and get and keep an undetectable viral load can live long and healthy lives and will not transmit HIV to their HIV-negative partners through sex,” says HIV.gov.

    Proper screening and case management are the keys to living well with HIV. Many HIV tests are now quick, free and painless. Your LaSalle doctor can ensure that you get properly tested.


    LaSalle Medical Associates serves more than 350,000 patients in their clinics and statewide Independent Physicians Association Group (IPA). Patients are covered by Medi-Cal, Medicare and Covered California, as well as those covered by Blue Cross, Blue Shield, Brand New Day, Molina, Care 1st, Health Net and Inland Empire Health Plan (IEHP).

    For more information call 1-855-349-6019 or go online to LaSalleMedical.com.

    B R I E F: 317 Words

    LaSalle Medical Observes World AIDS Day December 1st

    “The development of pre-exposure preventive care or PrEP is highly effective in decreasing transmission of HIV in high-risk populations such as intravenous drug users and members of the homosexual/bisexual community,” says Dr. Andrew Benin.
    REDLANDS, CALIF. –—LaSalle Medical Associates joins the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and many other organizations to celebrate the advances that have been made in the treatment and prevention of AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome), the disease caused by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV).

    Since its beginning in 1988, World AIDS Day has brought together agencies of the United Nations and the United States, as well as scores of healthcare organizations and medical societies worldwide to unite in addressing specific themes related to HIV. UNAIDS has announced the theme for 2023 is “Let Communities Lead.”

    UNAIDS says, “Communities connect people with person-centered public health services, build trust, innovate, monitor implementation of policies and services, and hold providers accountable…. World AIDS Day 2023 will…unleash the full potential of community leadership to enable the end of AIDS.”

    The only way to know if you have HIV is to get tested, and that’s where LaSalle Medical Associates comes in. LaSalle’s Dr. Andrew Benin says, “Screening is as easy as a simple blood test with highly accurate results typically available in less than a week.

    “More importantly, a new pre-exposure preventive care or PrEP is highly effective in decreasing transmission of HIV in high-risk populations such as intravenous drug users and members of the homosexual/bisexual community.”

    LaSalle Medical Associates serves more than 350,000 patients in their clinics and statewide Independent Physicians Association Group (IPA). Patients are covered by Medi-Cal, Medicare and Covered California, as well as those covered by Blue Cross, Blue Shield, Brand New Day, Molina, Care 1st, Health Net, and Inland Empire Health Plan (IEHP).

    For more information call 1-855-349-6019 or go online to LaSalleMedical.com.

     

    About LaSalle Medical Associates

    LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc. is one of the largest independent and Latino-owned healthcare companies in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. The corporate office is in Redlands.

    LaSalle is also an Independent Practice Association (IPA) of independently contracted doctors, hospitals, and clinics, delivering high-quality patient care to over 350,000 patients in Fresno, Kings, Los Angeles, Madera, Riverside, San Bernardino and Tulare counties.

    Renaissance Man Cornelius Bryant Teaches Etiquette to Salvation Army Rehabilitation Center Residents

    Photo Caption: Davis Ashly, Rudy Salcido, Cornelius Bryant, Angel Cariel, and Randy Robinson have completed an eight-session course covering life skills, leadership and etiquette to men at The Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps’ Adult Rehabilitation Center (ARC).

    Photo Caption: Davis Ashly, Rudy Salcido, Cornelius Bryant, Angel Cariel, and Randy Robinson have completed an eight-session course covering life skills, leadership and etiquette to men at The Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps’ Adult Rehabilitation Center (ARC).

     

    “I’ve gotten feedback from the students and without exception, they all say that this is a course that should be offered again,” said Major Martha Sheppard, Co-director of The Salvation Army ARC.

    SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF. — Cornelius Bryant, “The Renaissance Man,” has started teaching a second eight-session course covering life skills, leadership and etiquette to men at The Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Center (ARC). The weekly evening classes last eight weeks, with a break for Thanksgiving.

    Bryant’s students volunteer for the course. “At first,” says Bryant, “they are a bit shy and don’t know what to expect. But I work at getting to know each of them to start drawing them out, getting them to open up and contribute to our conversations. By week three, my students are turning into teachers.”

    The Salvation Army’s Adult Rehabilitation Centers are 180-day residential work-therapy programs that provide spiritual, social, and emotional assistance to people who are recovering from alcohol or substance abuse issues and need a stable, supportive environment while they learn the skills and routines, they need to find gainful employment and permanent housing.

    About 120 program participants are 21 to 65 years old and must have passed a drug test and breathalyzer when they arrive. They need to perform a work therapy assignment for up to eight hours a day, six days a week to help them establish a good work ethic.

    Individual schedules can be adjusted to meet participant needs. The program also requires attending counseling sessions, educational classes, and worship services.

    Major Donald Sheppard and his wife, Major Martha, supervise the San Bernardino ARC, and Martha Sheppard had this to say about Bryant’s class: “I’ve gotten feedback from the students, and without exception, they all say that this is a course that should be offered again.”

    Major Sheppard collected written feedback from the students, who at this writing have completed six of the eight weeks. Major Sheppard notes that they are all great workers who have what it takes to get and hold a job. The problem is their attitude and ability to solve problems.

    “Bryant’s classes are teaching them a new mindset with the core lesson that the outer man is a reflection of the inner man, and it is the inner man that needs a new direction,” says Major Sheppard.

    Bryant’s curriculum covers communication skills, social skills, proper hygiene, personal grooming, proper attire, bathroom etiquette, accountability, consideration for others and dining etiquette.

    All nine skills smooth participants’ rough edges and add to their self-confidence and ability to present an agreeable appearance and manner. This improves the ability to create the friendly, productive relationships essential to getting and holding a job and reuniting with family members.

    Bryant says, “I founded this program to encourage, empower and equip people to accept responsibility for their actions and make positive changes from the inside out that will transform themselves and others.”

    Major Sheppard collected written feedback from the students, all of it positive. Due to their upbringing and life experience up to now, their approach to communicating with their peers has tended to be confrontational, which typically results in defensiveness and hostility. With the lessons from Bryant’s curriculum, they learn tact and a more collaborative approach.

    One of the lessons taught is dining skills. Upon completion, graduates will be treated to a special dinner and given a certificate of completion that can be added to their résumé.

    For more information call Cornelius Bryant at (951) 238-4720 or send an email to cornelius@TheRenaissanceManES.com.

    The San Bernardino ARC has programs for men only, and the Pasadena and Anaheim locations serve women.  For more information about The Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Program call (909) 889-9605.

    Photo Caption: Graduates family and Salvation ARC Officers join to celebrate the men’s graduation from the eight-session course covering life skills, leadership and etiquette.

    Photo Caption: Graduates family and Salvation ARC Officers join to celebrate the men’s graduation from the eight-session course covering life skills, leadership and etiquette.

    About The Renaissance Man

    The Renaissance Man School of Life Skills, Leadership, and Etiquette was founded by Cornelius Bryant to encourage, empower, and equip people to accept responsibility for their actions and make positive changes from the inside out that will transform themselves and others.

    These changes are brought about by teaching a combination of life skills, leadership skills, etiquette, good manners, respectful behavior, realistic goal setting, strategic planning and proper work ethic.


    Research has shown that improvements in these areas lead to increased positive interactions within the family structure as well as society at large. Classes are provided for grades 6 through 12 and

    New Ways to Prevent RSV Infections

    RSV's symptoms include runny nose, loss of appetite, coughing, sneezing, fever, and wheezing. In most cases, these symptoms show up in stages, rather than all at once. In very young infants, "the only symptoms may be irritability, decreased activity, and breathing difficulties," per the CDC. Shiane and Shaila Dameron parents use preventive medicine. The children have all of their vaccines and receive checkups with their doctors every six months.

    RSV’s symptoms include runny nose, loss of appetite, coughing, sneezing, fever, and wheezing. In most cases, these symptoms show up in stages, rather than all at once. In very young infants, “the only symptoms may be irritability, decreased activity, and breathing difficulties,” per the CDC. Shiane and Shaila Dameron parents use preventive medicine. The children have all of their vaccines and receive checkups with their doctors every six months.

    “RSV is a cold-like virus that is usually mild but can put some people in the hospital,” says Dr. Cheryl Emoto, Medical Director of LaSalle Medical Associates. “For the first time this fall, young infants and seniors (those with the highest risk for severe disease) now have a way to prevent it.”

    SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF. – A new monoclonal antibody and new anti-viral vaccines are coming for the first time to provide protection against RSV, Respiratory Syncytial (sin-SISH-uhl) Virus. LaSalle Medical Associates clinics will be providing these breakthroughs to patients this fall.

    “RSV is a cold-like virus that is usually mild but can put some people in the hospital,” says Dr. Cheryl Emoto, Medical Director of LaSalle Medical Associates. “For the first time this fall, young infants and seniors (those with the highest risk for severe disease) now have a way to prevent it.”

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention notes that “Most people recover in a week or two, but RSV can be serious. Infants and older adults are more likely to develop severe RSV and need hospitalization. Vaccines are available to protect older adults from severe RSV. Monoclonal antibodies are available to protect infants.”

    The CDC goes on to note that RSV is “one of the most common causes of childhood illness and is the most common cause of hospitalization among infants [emphasis ours].” It usually starts in the fall and peaks in the winter, but this can vary.

    Monoclonal antibodies and vaccines may now prevent RSV. A monoclonal antibody is a clone of a unique white blood cell (white blood cells are the body’s own infection fighters) given to augment and reinforce the body’s natural defenses. It’s the option available for infants who are entering their first RSV season. They are not used when someone already has RSV.

    Up until now, almost all children have contracted RSV by the time they reach 24 months, so the new prevention regimen has the potential to prevent illness and potential complications such as bronchitis and pneumonia, making life easier for both infants and their parents or caretakers.

    For older adults, the CDC estimates that between 60 to 100 thousand are hospitalized every year. resulting in 6,000 to 10,000 deaths. The most at-risk cohorts are older adults, adults with chronic heart or lung disease, those with weakened immune systems or certain underlying medical conditions and residents in nursing homes or long-term care facilities.

    Complications may include asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, a chronic disease of the lungs that makes it hard to breathe), and congestive heart failure—when the heart can’t pump enough blood and oxygen through the body.

    Additionally, this year, there is now a regimen for pregnant women that keeps the developing fetus safe from infection. Now is the time to contact your healthcare provider to schedule an appointment for preventive care, especially if you are pregnant, have an infant under 8 months of age or are 60 years of age or older.

    LaSalle Medical Associates serves more than 350,000 patients in their clinics and statewide Independent Physicians Association Group (IPA) who are covered by Medi-Cal, Medicare, and Covered California, as well as those covered by Blue Cross, Blue Shield, Brand New Day, Molina, Care 1st, Health Net and Inland Empire Health Plan (IEHP).

    LaSalle staff also help people who come into a clinic without any insurance to become enrolled for a variety of state and federal health coverage.

    For more information call (909) 890-0407 or go online to LaSalleMedical.com.

    —30—

    B R I E F: 325 Words

    New Ways to Prevent RSV Infections 

    “RSV is a cold-like virus that is usually mild but can put some people in the hospital,” says Dr. Cheryl Emoto, Medical Director of LaSalle Medical Associates. “For the first time this fall, young infants and seniors (those with the highest risk for severe disease) now have a way to prevent it.”

    SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF. – A new monoclonal antibody and new anti-viral vaccines are coming for the first time to provide protection against RSV, Respiratory Syncytial (sin-SISH-uhl) Virus. LaSalle Medical Associates clinics will be providing these breakthroughs to patients this fall.

    “RSV is a cold-like virus that is usually mild but can put some people in the hospital,” says Dr. Cheryl Emoto, Medical Director of LaSalle Medical Associates. “For the first time this fall, young infants and seniors (those with the highest risk for severe disease) now have a way to prevent it.”

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention notes that “Most people recover in a week or two, but RSV can be serious. Infants and older adults are more likely to develop severe RSV and need hospitalization. Vaccines are available to protect older adults from severe RSV. Monoclonal antibodies are available to protect infants.”

    Monoclonal antibodies and vaccines can now help prevent RSV. A monoclonal antibody is a clone of a unique white blood cell (white blood cells are the body’s own infection fighters) given to augment and reinforce the body’s natural defenses. It’s the option available for infants entering their first RSV season. They are not used when someone already has RSV.

    RSV can lead to severe complications, such as asthma, bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, a chronic disease of the lungs that makes it hard to breathe), congestive heart failure (when the heart can’t pump enough blood and oxygen through the body) and pneumonia.

    For more information call (909) 890-0407 or go online to LaSalleMedical.com.

    About LaSalle Medical Associates

    LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc. is one of the largest independent and Latino-owned healthcare companies in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. The corporate office is in Redlands.

    LaSalle is also an Independent Practice Association (IPA) of independently contracted doctors, hospitals, and clinics, delivering high-quality patient care to over 350,000 patients in Fresno, Kings, Los Angeles, Madera, Riverside, San Bernardino and Tulare counties.

    The Salvation Army Serves Thanksgiving Dinner

    Volunteers serve Thanksgiving meals. The annual Thanksgiving meal brings in hundreds of families and individuals who do not have the means to provide themselves with a Thanksgiving dinner. The San Bernardino event serves about 200 people each year.

    Volunteers serve Thanksgiving meals. The annual Thanksgiving meal brings in hundreds of families and individuals who do not have the means to provide themselves with a Thanksgiving dinner. The San Bernardino event serves about 200 people each year.

    “We’re serving a wonderful Thanksgiving dinner with turkey, potatoes, gravy, stuffing, vegetables, and pie,” said Naomi Goforth the program director.

    REDLANDS, CALIF.— This holiday season the San Bernardino Corps of The Salvation Army once again holds its annual Thanksgiving dinner to help needy families in San Bernardino.

    The San Bernardino Corps will serve dinner from 4:00 P.M to 6:00 pm on Thanksgiving Day, Thursday, Nov. 24, at the Hospitality House & Family Transitional Living Center, 925 W. 10th St., San Bernardino.

    “We’re serving a wonderful Thanksgiving dinner with turkey, potatoes, gravy, stuffing, vegetables, and pie,” said Naomi Goforth the program director. “We still need 500 turkeys and many side dishes,” Goforth added. “Whatever people have on their heart to donate, we need.”

    The Salvation Army encourages donations of turkey or ham, side dishes, and other food by calling (909) 888-1336 to plan, or to volunteer to help serve the Thanksgiving dinner.

    The annual Thanksgiving meal brings in hundreds of families and individuals who do not have the means to provide themselves with a Thanksgiving dinner. People come from all parts of the Inland Empire for the celebration. The San Bernardino event serves about 200 people each year.

    Volunteers help prepare the food and serve meals to the families. In recent years, dozens of volunteers have helped the San Bernardino Corps prepare and serve dinner.

    “Thanksgiving should be a special day for everyone, not just for those who can afford it,” says Goforth.

    Other Salvation Army Corps in the Inland Empire are also planning Thanksgiving dinners, although many of these will take place the day before Thanksgiving. To receive information about the dates and times for the dinners at other corps, or to volunteer please call 1-800-SAL-ARMY or 1-800-725-2769.

    Donors are asked to drop off turkeys, hams, canned food, cash, checks, or gift cards at the Salvation Army’s Corps Office at 838 Alta Street, Redlands, 92373, for more information call (909) 792-6868.

    Volunteers serve Thanksgiving meals. The annual Thanksgiving meal brings in hundreds of families and individuals who do not have the means to provide themselves with a Thanksgiving dinner. The San Bernardino event serves about 200 people each year.

    Volunteers serve Thanksgiving meals. The annual Thanksgiving meal brings in hundreds of families and individuals who do not have the means to provide themselves with a Thanksgiving dinner. The San Bernardino event serves about 200 people each year.

    About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps

    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church and offers holistic programs for individuals without discrimination. They serve the cities of Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Loma Linda, Mentone, Redlands, Rialto, San Bernardino, and Yucaipa, as well as Big Bear, Blue Jay, Crestline, Lake Arrowhead, and other mountain communities.

    The Salvation Army is one of the world’s largest charitable and service organizations and has been serving San Bernardino since 1888, supporting those in need.

    Photo Caption: Volunteers serve Thanksgiving meals. The annual Thanksgiving meal brings in hundreds of families and individuals who do not have the means to provide themselves with a Thanksgiving dinner. The San Bernardino event serves about 200 people each year.

    Looking for Black Heroes and Sheroes in the IE

    Photo Caption: 2023 Black Rose Award Winners - (From left) Accepted for Linda D. Wright; Arlington Rodgers Jr., President of the Black Culture Foundation; Rose Mayes, Humanitarian of the Year honoree; Gloria Macias Harrison, Black Rose awardee; Jim King, Black Rose Chair; Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson, Black Rose awardee; Accepting for San Bernardino Community Hospital Dr. Ruby Skinner, Medical Director, and Roz Nolan, Chief Nurse Executive Officer, and Foundation Treasurer Genevieve Echols.

    Photo Caption: 2023 Black Rose Award Winners – (From left) Accepted for Linda D. Wright; Arlington Rodgers Jr., President of the Black Culture Foundation; Rose Mayes, Humanitarian of the Year honoree; Gloria Macias Harrison, Black Rose awardee; Jim King, Black Rose Chair; Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson, Black Rose awardee; Accepting for San Bernardino Community Hospital Dr. Ruby Skinner, Medical Director, and Roz Nolan, Chief Nurse Executive Officer, and Foundation Treasurer Genevieve Echols. 

    “The Black Culture Foundation Celebrates the 31st Annual Black Rose Awards with our call for entries for the 2024 Black Rose Awards,” said President Ezekiel Adeleke

    SAN BERNARDINO, Calif. – Some people have made a career helping others. And some have done even more than that.

    “If you know someone whose passion is to help and make the community better for others, the Black Culture Foundation wants to know about them. We seek nominations for The Black Rose, Humanitarian of the Year, and Community Service awards,” said Black Culture Foundation President Ezekiel Adeleke.

    “We are looking for someone whose volunteer efforts go over and above their job-related activities,” said Carl M. Dameron Co-chair of the 2024 Thirty-first Black Rose Awards. “These are unsung heroes, people who volunteer with multiple organizations or give all of their spare time to one. They never seek their glory but want to make their community a better place to live.”

    To nominate someone for a Black Rose Award, email Dameron at blackrose@sbbcfoundation.org, or call or text him at (909) 534-9500. Nominations are due by November 30, 2023.

    The awards program focuses on the Black community in the Inland Empire, Dameron says, but an award winner need not be a resident of the IE. Many community leaders in law enforcement, education, and other public venues have been recognized and received an award in honor of the work they’ve done that benefits the Inland Empire.

    To become a volunteer or board member, call or text Dameron at (909) 534-9500 or email him at blackrose@sbbcfoundation.org, Nominations are due by November 30, 2023.

    The 31st Black Rose Awards ceremony takes place on Saturday, February 3, at Rhe Riverside Convention Center.

    About the Black Rose Awards

    The Black Rose Awards are a complement to Black History Month. The awards are sponsored by the Black Culture Foundation, a nonprofit founded in 1968 by a small group of people who were concerned that, “…nationwide, our school systems have not yet incorporated Black history studies into regular school curriculums. Thus, all students miss the opportunity to learn more about a vital part of this country’s history.”

    The Black Culture Foundation’s purpose “…is to foster an interest and a greater understanding of Black culture, to heighten community awareness of the accomplishments of Black people, past and present, and to plan, coordinate and direct an annual Black History Month parade and related cultural activities…[and] bridge the gaps across cultural lines by bringing the local community together to celebrate this event in the spirit of unity and brotherhood.”

    The Black Rose Awards are the Foundation’s showcase cultural event.

    Joe Baca Jr. to Speak at Democratic Luncheon Club November 17th

    San Bernardino County Fifth District Supervisor Joe Baca

    San Bernardino County Fifth District Supervisor Joe Baca

    SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF.— The San Bernardino Democratic Luncheon Club has announced that 5th District San Bernardino County Supervisor Joe Baca Jr. will be the guest speaker for the Club’s November 17th meeting.

    Baca has gained a reputation as a champion of education through his actions, such as his recent sponsorship of a College and Career Day at the County Government Office. Workshops, panel discussions, and networking sessions combined to connect students with County departments and professionals from diverse fields of potential interest to San Bernardino City and County school district students.

    Also during his tenure to date, the Supervisor has paid attention to park improvements, including compliance with Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements for the park’s restrooms, splash pads, and gating. He has also announced an affordable housing project for Bloomington, a mobile veterinarian clinic, and a partnership with Arrowhead Regional Medical Center to improve district residents’ access to the medical center’s mobile clinics.

    Democratic Luncheon Club President Attorney Tim Prince says, “Baca always delivers for San Bernardino.  He leads a great staff and commissioners, keeps his commitments, and is amongst the most responsive and committed of public servants.  We are lucky to have Joe as our Supervisor and friend.”

    Luncheon Club meetings start at noon and are held at Juan Pollo Restaurant, 1258 West 5th St., San Bernardino.

    Anyone wishing to contact the Club can send an email using the online “Contact Us” form at https://sbdems.com/?page_id=14.

    Democratic Luncheon Club Won’t Meet on Veterans Day

    Assemblymember Eloise Reyes, Attorney, and Club President Tim Prince, Connie Levia, KVCR President, Dave Jones, then CA Insurance Commissioner at the Democratic Luncheon Club.

    SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF.— In honor of Veterans Day on Friday, November 10th, the San Bernardino Democratic Luncheon Club will stay dark. Club president Tim Prince says, “Out of respect for those who have served our country so bravely, we have decided to skip our weekly business meeting in order to observe the holiday.”

    The Club usually meets on Fridays for lunch at the Juan Pollo Restaurant, 1258 West 5th St. in San Bernardino. The agenda includes a guest speaker, followed by club business. The next meeting will take place on Friday, November 17th, with 5th District County Supervisor Joe Baca Jr. as the guest speaker.

    The Club will also be dark the following Friday, November 24th, as it’s the day after Thanksgiving.

    Anyone wishing to contact the Club can send an email using the online “Contact Us” form at https://sbdems.com/?page_id=14.

    History of the Democratic Luncheon Club

    “I am honored to be entrusted by the Mayor and City Council with this opportunity to make recommendations on how our City Charter can be improved so that our city government can operate more effectively. The current Charter recognizes that periodic review is necessary, and adjustments should be made to enable the city to return to its All-America City greatness,” said Prince.

    Democratic Luncheon Club President Tim Prince.

     

     

     

    The Democraticy Luncheon Club of San Bernardino reorganized as a chartered club of the San Bernardino County Democratic Central Committee in 1993.

    Serving as the reorganized club’s first President, former Democratic Congressional Nominee Don Rusk sought to rebuild the then dormant club as a platform for Democrats and a forum for progressive ideas.

    The Luncheon Club is now one of the largest and most active political clubs in the Inland Empire. Contemporary ideas of progressive Democrats are presented virtually every Friday at Noon in a successful one-hour format.

    The range of distinguished speakers over its history includes United States Senator Barbara Boxer, U.S. Congressmen, California’s Lieutenant Governor, Attorney General, Insurance Commissioner, Senators, Assembly Members, a host of Mayors, Council Members, Chiefs of Police, Superintendents of Schools, labor leaders such as CTA State President, civil rights activists, attorneys, environmentalists, government officials, college professors, and, of course, Democratic candidates for partisan and nonpartisan offices.

    “Its mission is to present Democrats and their ideas to the public and to advance the ideals of the Democratic Party,” said Club President Tim Prince

    Save the Date for the Club’s annual banquet scheduled for February 24, 2024 at noon. The event is THE Inland Empire political event of the year.

    Democrats and their guests are invited to attend. Annual dues is $25. For further information contact Tim Prince at (909) 725-8474.

    October Is Liver Cancer Awareness Month

    Photo Caption: “Early recognition of symptoms, proper physical examination, and swift intervention are the keys to survival. If you or a family member have any of these symptoms, see your doctor immediately or go to the emergency room,” said Dr. Andrew Benin, M.D.

    Photo Caption: “Early recognition of symptoms, proper physical examination, and swift intervention are the keys to survival. If you or a family member have any of these symptoms, see your doctor immediately or go to the emergency room,” said Dr. Andrew Benin, M.D.

    “Here At LaSalle, we always stress the importance of annual physical exams and proper follow-ups to screen for cancers and other conditions that increase the risk of liver cancer,” says Dr. Andrew Benin of LaSalle Medical Associates.

    REDLANDS, CALIF. –October is Liver Cancer Awareness Month, and The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) aims to raise awareness about the warning signs of both types of liver cancer. The AACR notes that liver cancer is more prevalent in men than women, and it is more common among Asian/Pacific Islanders and American Indian/Alaska Natives.

    Dr. Andrew Benin of LaSalle Medical Associates says, “According to the NIH the incidence of liver cancer will increase by more than 50 percent and the number of deaths is projected to increase by more than 55 percent between 2020 and 2040. This is exactly why here at LaSalle, we always stress the importance of annual physical exams and proper follow-ups to screen for cancers and other conditions that increase the risk of liver cancer such as hepatitis.”

    “We encourage everyone to work on lifestyle modifications such as decreasing alcohol use, avoiding IV drug use, and limiting fatty foods. Ultimately, the best thing anybody can do for screening and prevention is to make an appointment and have a conversation with their healthcare provider. Early recognition of symptoms, proper physical examination, and swift intervention are the keys to survival.”

    The two types of primary adult liver cancer are liver cells (hepatocellular carcinoma) and liver bile duct cancer (cholangiocarcinoma). People who have cirrhosis or hepatitis B or C are especially at risk, according to the AACR.

    The National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program projects 41,210 new cases of liver and intrahepatic bile duct cancer in 2023, resulting in approximately 29,380 deaths. The five-year relative survival rate is only 21.6 percent.

    Symptoms for both liver cell cancer and bile duct cancer include losing weight without trying, yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes (jaundice), and or white, chalky stools.

    Symptoms unique to liver cell cancer are loss of appetite, upper abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, general weakness and fatigue, and abdominal swelling, Symptoms unique to bile duct cancer are intensely itchy skin, abdominal pain on the right side, below the ribs, fever, night sweats and dark urine.

    “Early recognition of symptoms, proper physical examination, and swift intervention are the keys to survival. If you or a family member have any of these symptoms, see your doctor immediately or go to the emergency room,” said Dr. Benin.

    LaSalle Medical Associates serves more than 350,000 patients in their clinics and statewide Independent Physicians Association Group (IPA). Patients are covered by Medi-Cal, Medicare, Covered California, Blue Cross, Blue Shield, Brand New Day, Molina, Care 1st, Health Net, and Inland Empire Health Plan (IEHP).

    For an appointment or more information about LaSalle Medical Associates, call 1-855-349-6019 or go online to LaSalleMedical.com.

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    B R I E F: 320 Words

    October Is Liver Cancer Awareness Month

    “Early recognition of symptoms, proper physical examination, and swift intervention are the keys to survival,” says Dr. Andrew Benin of LaSalle Medical Associates.

    REDLANDS, CALIF. –October is Liver Cancer Awareness Month, and The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) aims to raise awareness about the warning signs of both types of liver cancer. The AACR notes that liver cancer is more prevalent in men than women, and it is more common among Asian/Pacific Islanders and American Indian/Alaska Natives.

    The National Cancer Institute projects 41,210 new cases of liver and bile duct cancer, with approximately 29,380 deaths for 2023. The five-year relative survival rate is just 21.6 percent.

    Symptoms for both liver cell cancer and bile duct cancer include losing weight without trying, yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes (jaundice), and white, chalky stools.

    Symptoms unique to liver cell cancer are loss of appetite, upper abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, general weakness and fatigue, and abdominal swelling, symptoms unique to bile duct cancer are intensely itchy skin, abdominal pain on the right side, below the ribs, fever, night sweats and dark urine.

    Dr. Andrew Benin of LaSalle Medical Associates, says, “According to the NIH the incidence of liver cancer would increase by more than 50 percent and the number of deaths would increase by more than 55 percent between 2020 and 2040. This is exactly why here At LaSalle, we always stress the importance of annual physical exams and proper follow-ups to screen for cancers and other conditions that increase the risk of liver cancer such as hepatitis.

    “Early recognition of symptoms, proper physical examination, and swift intervention are the keys to survival. If you or a family member have any of these symptoms, see your doctor immediately or go to the emergency room,” said Dr. Benin.

    For an appointment or more information about LaSalle Medical Associates, call 1-855-349-6019 or go online to LaSalleMedical.com.

    —30—

    About LaSalle Medical Associates

    LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc. is one of the largest independent and Latino-owned healthcare companies in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. The corporate office is in Redlands.

    LaSalle is also an Independent Practice Association (IPA) of independently contracted doctors, hospitals, and clinics, delivering high-quality patient care to over 350,000 patients in Fresno, Kings, Los Angeles, Madera, Riverside, San Bernardino and Tulare counties.