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    Learn about The Black Rose Awards on Inland Empire Alive

    Learn about The Black Rose Awards on Inland Empire Alive with  Carl M. Dameron:

    For tickets:  https://sbbcfoundation.org/events/2024-black-rose-awards/

    To sponsor https://blackculturefoundation.square.site/

     

    Read morehttps://dameroncommunications.com/2024/01/23/black-rose-culture-foundation-announces-2024-winners/

     

    The Black Rose Awards are Friday, February 23, at 5:30 p.m. Tickets are going FAST, get your tickets TODAY: https://sbbcfoundation.org/events/2024-black-rose-awards/

    The Black Rose Awards are Friday, February 23, at 5:30 p.m. Tickets are going FAST, get your tickets TODAY: https://sbbcfoundation.org/events/2024-black-rose-awards/

    How to Eliminate Black Disparities in Healthcare

    Shiane, Shaila, Carl And Malaika Jacocks all enjoy the Gold Standard of Care at LaSalle Medical Associates.

    Shiane, Shaila, Carl, and Malaika Dameron all enjoy the Gold Standard of Care at LaSalle Medical Associates.

    “We not only need more Black physicians, but we also need both doctors and patients to communicate more openly,” says Dr. Albert Arteaga, Chair of LaSalle Medical Associates.

    REDLANDS, CA. — A 2022 study by Pew Research finds that most Black Americans feel good about the quality of health care they have received recently. But the findings are mixed, with 47% saying outcomes have gotten better over the past 20 years, 31% saying they’re the same and 20% feel things have gotten worse.

    On March 29, 2023, the Kaiser Family Foundation released a study, “Key Data on Health and Health Care by Race and Ethnicity” that noted, “While inequities in access to and use of health care contribute to disparities in health, inequities across broader social and economic factors that drive health, often referred to as social determinants of health, also play a major role.”

    Social determinants include “socioeconomic status, education, neighborhood and physical environment, and social support networks, as well as access to health care.” Several initiatives within and outside of the healthcare system are working to address these factors.

    Nonetheless, two things not mentioned in these studies need to be pointed out. Dr. Albert Arteaga, Chair of LaSalle Medical Associates, the Inland Empire’s largest independent healthcare provider, said, “We not only need more Black physicians, but we also need both doctors and patients to communicate more openly.”

    Dr. Arteaga points out that it is only natural that Black patients will feel more comfortable being treated by a Black physician.

    A 2021 study from the National Library of Medicine found that 5.8% of family medicine doctors are Black, 7.8% of internal medicine specialists, and 7.3% of pediatricians.

    Blacks make up 13.6% of the U.S. population, so the number of Black physicians is under-represented.

    Dr. Arteaga adds that a key factor in patient satisfaction with their healthcare provider is trust. “At LaSalle,” commented Dr. Arteaga, “we address this in several ways.

    “One is that when we open a facility, it stays open in the same location. Our Black and Hispanic patients know that the LaSalle clinic they visit is going to be in the same place for the long term. Our patients trust that their LaSalle facility isn’t going to move. We opened our first clinic in Fontana in 1984 and it’s still in the same location,” he continued.

    LaSalle employs a diverse staff who all provide a Gold Standard of care for their patients. Part of that lofty standard includes communicating effectively and openly with patients. The old saw about “bedside manner” includes the style of a person’s communication with others, per Merriam-Webster, and LaSalle’s staff are skilled at providing a good bedside manner.

    “Another thing our patients can count on is that their health care provider won’t change. We don’t believe in transferring staff from one location to another. The relationship a LaSalle patient has with their doctor won’t be interrupted because of some HR policy that moves providers around.

    “Lastly, our facilities are scrupulously clean. We maintain a Gold Standard of cleanliness in all our clinics that match our Gold Standard of care for all patients, regardless of their racial or ethnic background.”

    Dr. Arteaga emphasized, “We encourage anyone who feels uneasy about communicating with their health care provider to contact their insurer and ask for a different doctor. Good communication is so important a part of good healthcare, no one should be going without it.”

    For more information call 1-855-349-6019 or go online to LaSalleMedical.com.

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    B R I E F: 291 words

    How to Eliminate Black Disparities in Healthcare

    “We not only need more Black physicians, but we also need both doctors and patients to communicate more openly,” says Dr. Albert Arteaga, Chair of LaSalle Medical Associates.

    REDLANDS, CA. —A 2022 study by Pew Research finds that most Black Americans feel good about the quality of health care they have received recently. But the findings are mixed, with 47% saying outcomes have gotten better over the past 20 years, 31% saying they’re the same and 20% feel things have gotten worse.

    A 2023 study by the Kaiser Family Foundation noted, “While inequities in access to and use of health care contribute to disparities in health, inequities across broader social and economic factors that drive health, often referred to as social determinants of health, also play a major role.”

    However, Dr. Albert Arteaga, Chair of LaSalle Medical Associates, points to two things not mentioned in these two studies—the need for more Black doctors and better communication between doctors and patients. “We not only need more Black physicians, we also need both doctors and patients to communicate more openly,” he said.

    LaSalle provides a Gold Standard of care to all its patients, regardless of race or ethnicity. This includes communicating effectively and openly with patients. A good “bedside manner” includes communication style with others, per Merriam-Webster, and LaSalle’s people practice a good bedside manner with everyone they see.

    Dr. Arteaga emphasized, “I encourage anyone who feels uneasy about communicating with their health care provider to contact their insurer and ask for a different doctor. Good communication is so important a part of good healthcare, no one should be going without it.”

    For more information call 1-855-349-6019 or go online to LaSalleMedical.com.

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    Help The Salvation Army Give Homeless and Needy Children Christmas Presents

    Help The Salvation Army Give Homeless and Needy Children Christmas Presents

    Help The Salvation Army Give Homeless and Needy Children Christmas Presents

    “Please support disadvantaged children with a Christmas gift at the Angel Tree by visiting our table in the Inland Center Mall and fulfilling the wishes of a child till December 22nd,” said Major Braga.

     

    (Redlands, Calif.)  Giving a toy to a needy child. It is a small gesture but participating in The Salvation Army’s Angel Tree will make this Christmas memorable for you as well as the children in need.  Without your help, some children won’t get anything for Christmas.

    “Just pick up an Angel Tree tag and buy a needy child the gift listed on the tag! The Angel Tree matches donors with hundreds of children who are relying on The Salvation Army this year to bring them a Merry Christmas,” said Major Adelma Braga, Corps Officer of The Salvation Army of San Bernardino.

    The San Bernardino Corps Angel Tree is at Inland Center Mall in San Bernardino, 500 Inland Center Drive in San Bernardino, 92408.  Donations received here provide toys to children from 400 disadvantaged families in Big Bear, Blue Jay, Crestline, Lake Arrowhead, the mountain communities, Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto, Loma Linda, Yucaipa, Mentone, Redlands, and San Bernardino.

    “Please support disadvantaged children with a Christmas gift at the Angel Tree by visiting our table in the Inland Center Mall and fulfilling the wishes of a child till December 22nd,” said Major Issas Braga.

    Shoppers find cards attached to the Angel Tree. These cards include the names and wish lists of needy children whose families cannot afford to buy gifts. Shoppers simply pluck a tag off the Angel Tree and head for the appropriate store to purchase their gift donations, then return it to the Angel Tree volunteers.

    Shoppers get to keep the card as an ornament to hang on their own Christmas tree, reminding them of their good deeds.

    “This is a great way to start a tradition with your family, by selecting a gift for a needy child together. The gifts are based on their wishes and for some children, it may be the only gift they receive all year,” said Major Braga.

    “Bicycles, board games, and clothes are just a few items on each child’s wish list,” said Major Braga. “Shoppers who participate in the program are encouraged to shop for more than what is needed on the list. I can’t think of a better way for local people including business owners and managers to help the community and spread the spirit of Christmas.”

    For more information on the Angel Tree call Steven Pinckney or visit the tree in the Inland Center Mall in San Bernardino.   Donors are asked to drop off turkeys, hams, canned food, cash, checks, or gift cards at the Salvation Army’s Corps Office at 838 Alta Street, Redlands, 92373. For more information call (909) 792-6868.

    To donate money by phone call 1-800-SAL-ARMY (800-725-2769).  Donate online at: https://sanbernardino.salvationarmy.org

    About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps

    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church and offers holistic programs for individuals of all. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world.

    The Salvation Army has served San Bernardino since 1888.  The Salvation Army supports those in need without discrimination.  The Salvation Army serves the cities of Big Bear, Blue Jay, Crestline, Lake Arrowhead, other mountain communities, Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto, Loma Linda, Yucaipa, Mentone, Redlands, and San Bernardino.

    The Salvation Army Serves Thanksgiving Dinner

    Volunteers serve Thanksgiving meals. The annual Thanksgiving meal brings in hundreds of families and individuals who do not have the means to provide themselves with a Thanksgiving dinner. The San Bernardino event serves about 200 people each year.

    Volunteers serve Thanksgiving meals. The annual Thanksgiving meal brings in hundreds of families and individuals who do not have the means to provide themselves with a Thanksgiving dinner. The San Bernardino event serves about 200 people each year.

    “We’re serving a wonderful Thanksgiving dinner with turkey, potatoes, gravy, stuffing, vegetables, and pie,” said Naomi Goforth the program director.

    REDLANDS, CALIF.— This holiday season the San Bernardino Corps of The Salvation Army once again holds its annual Thanksgiving dinner to help needy families in San Bernardino.

    The San Bernardino Corps will serve dinner from 4:00 P.M to 6:00 pm on Thanksgiving Day, Thursday, Nov. 24, at the Hospitality House & Family Transitional Living Center, 925 W. 10th St., San Bernardino.

    “We’re serving a wonderful Thanksgiving dinner with turkey, potatoes, gravy, stuffing, vegetables, and pie,” said Naomi Goforth the program director. “We still need 500 turkeys and many side dishes,” Goforth added. “Whatever people have on their heart to donate, we need.”

    The Salvation Army encourages donations of turkey or ham, side dishes, and other food by calling (909) 888-1336 to plan, or to volunteer to help serve the Thanksgiving dinner.

    The annual Thanksgiving meal brings in hundreds of families and individuals who do not have the means to provide themselves with a Thanksgiving dinner. People come from all parts of the Inland Empire for the celebration. The San Bernardino event serves about 200 people each year.

    Volunteers help prepare the food and serve meals to the families. In recent years, dozens of volunteers have helped the San Bernardino Corps prepare and serve dinner.

    “Thanksgiving should be a special day for everyone, not just for those who can afford it,” says Goforth.

    Other Salvation Army Corps in the Inland Empire are also planning Thanksgiving dinners, although many of these will take place the day before Thanksgiving. To receive information about the dates and times for the dinners at other corps, or to volunteer please call 1-800-SAL-ARMY or 1-800-725-2769.

    Donors are asked to drop off turkeys, hams, canned food, cash, checks, or gift cards at the Salvation Army’s Corps Office at 838 Alta Street, Redlands, 92373, for more information call (909) 792-6868.

    Volunteers serve Thanksgiving meals. The annual Thanksgiving meal brings in hundreds of families and individuals who do not have the means to provide themselves with a Thanksgiving dinner. The San Bernardino event serves about 200 people each year.

    Volunteers serve Thanksgiving meals. The annual Thanksgiving meal brings in hundreds of families and individuals who do not have the means to provide themselves with a Thanksgiving dinner. The San Bernardino event serves about 200 people each year.

    About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps

    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church and offers holistic programs for individuals without discrimination. They serve the cities of Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Loma Linda, Mentone, Redlands, Rialto, San Bernardino, and Yucaipa, as well as Big Bear, Blue Jay, Crestline, Lake Arrowhead, and other mountain communities.

    The Salvation Army is one of the world’s largest charitable and service organizations and has been serving San Bernardino since 1888, supporting those in need.

    Photo Caption: Volunteers serve Thanksgiving meals. The annual Thanksgiving meal brings in hundreds of families and individuals who do not have the means to provide themselves with a Thanksgiving dinner. The San Bernardino event serves about 200 people each year.

    Looking for Black Heroes and Sheroes in the IE

    Photo Caption: 2023 Black Rose Award Winners - (From left) Accepted for Linda D. Wright; Arlington Rodgers Jr., President of the Black Culture Foundation; Rose Mayes, Humanitarian of the Year honoree; Gloria Macias Harrison, Black Rose awardee; Jim King, Black Rose Chair; Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson, Black Rose awardee; Accepting for San Bernardino Community Hospital Dr. Ruby Skinner, Medical Director, and Roz Nolan, Chief Nurse Executive Officer, and Foundation Treasurer Genevieve Echols.

    Photo Caption: 2023 Black Rose Award Winners – (From left) Accepted for Linda D. Wright; Arlington Rodgers Jr., President of the Black Culture Foundation; Rose Mayes, Humanitarian of the Year honoree; Gloria Macias Harrison, Black Rose awardee; Jim King, Black Rose Chair; Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson, Black Rose awardee; Accepting for San Bernardino Community Hospital Dr. Ruby Skinner, Medical Director, and Roz Nolan, Chief Nurse Executive Officer, and Foundation Treasurer Genevieve Echols. 

    “The Black Culture Foundation Celebrates the 31st Annual Black Rose Awards with our call for entries for the 2024 Black Rose Awards,” said President Ezekiel Adeleke

    SAN BERNARDINO, Calif. – Some people have made a career helping others. And some have done even more than that.

    “If you know someone whose passion is to help and make the community better for others, the Black Culture Foundation wants to know about them. We seek nominations for The Black Rose, Humanitarian of the Year, and Community Service awards,” said Black Culture Foundation President Ezekiel Adeleke.

    “We are looking for someone whose volunteer efforts go over and above their job-related activities,” said Carl M. Dameron Co-chair of the 2024 Thirty-first Black Rose Awards. “These are unsung heroes, people who volunteer with multiple organizations or give all of their spare time to one. They never seek their glory but want to make their community a better place to live.”

    To nominate someone for a Black Rose Award, email Dameron at blackrose@sbbcfoundation.org, or call or text him at (909) 534-9500. Nominations are due by November 30, 2023.

    The awards program focuses on the Black community in the Inland Empire, Dameron says, but an award winner need not be a resident of the IE. Many community leaders in law enforcement, education, and other public venues have been recognized and received an award in honor of the work they’ve done that benefits the Inland Empire.

    To become a volunteer or board member, call or text Dameron at (909) 534-9500 or email him at blackrose@sbbcfoundation.org, Nominations are due by November 30, 2023.

    The 31st Black Rose Awards ceremony takes place on Saturday, February 3, at Rhe Riverside Convention Center.

    About the Black Rose Awards

    The Black Rose Awards are a complement to Black History Month. The awards are sponsored by the Black Culture Foundation, a nonprofit founded in 1968 by a small group of people who were concerned that, “…nationwide, our school systems have not yet incorporated Black history studies into regular school curriculums. Thus, all students miss the opportunity to learn more about a vital part of this country’s history.”

    The Black Culture Foundation’s purpose “…is to foster an interest and a greater understanding of Black culture, to heighten community awareness of the accomplishments of Black people, past and present, and to plan, coordinate and direct an annual Black History Month parade and related cultural activities…[and] bridge the gaps across cultural lines by bringing the local community together to celebrate this event in the spirit of unity and brotherhood.”

    The Black Rose Awards are the Foundation’s showcase cultural event.

    Joe Baca Jr. to Speak at Democratic Luncheon Club November 17th

    San Bernardino County Fifth District Supervisor Joe Baca

    San Bernardino County Fifth District Supervisor Joe Baca

    SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF.— The San Bernardino Democratic Luncheon Club has announced that 5th District San Bernardino County Supervisor Joe Baca Jr. will be the guest speaker for the Club’s November 17th meeting.

    Baca has gained a reputation as a champion of education through his actions, such as his recent sponsorship of a College and Career Day at the County Government Office. Workshops, panel discussions, and networking sessions combined to connect students with County departments and professionals from diverse fields of potential interest to San Bernardino City and County school district students.

    Also during his tenure to date, the Supervisor has paid attention to park improvements, including compliance with Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements for the park’s restrooms, splash pads, and gating. He has also announced an affordable housing project for Bloomington, a mobile veterinarian clinic, and a partnership with Arrowhead Regional Medical Center to improve district residents’ access to the medical center’s mobile clinics.

    Democratic Luncheon Club President Attorney Tim Prince says, “Baca always delivers for San Bernardino.  He leads a great staff and commissioners, keeps his commitments, and is amongst the most responsive and committed of public servants.  We are lucky to have Joe as our Supervisor and friend.”

    Luncheon Club meetings start at noon and are held at Juan Pollo Restaurant, 1258 West 5th St., San Bernardino.

    Anyone wishing to contact the Club can send an email using the online “Contact Us” form at https://sbdems.com/?page_id=14.

    Get Screened During Breast Cancer Awareness Month

    “Women should not take chances. Every woman should get an annual breast cancer screening and because October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, now is the perfect time to schedule an exam,” said LaSalle Medical Associates CEO Dr. Arteaga.

    “Women should not take chances. Every woman should get an annual breast cancer screening. Because October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, now is the perfect time to schedule an exam,” said LaSalle Medical Associates CEO Dr. Arteaga.

    “Women should not take chances. Every woman should get an annual breast cancer screening. Because October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, now is the perfect time to schedule an exam,” said LaSalle Medical Associates CEO Dr. Arteaga.

    REDLANDS, CALIF. LaSalle Medical Associates encourages women to come in for breast cancer screening during October, which is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. ” October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, an annual campaign to raise awareness about the impact of breast cancer.,” said the National Breast Cancer Foundation, Inc.

    The National Comprehensive Cancer Network says mammograms should start at 40 for women at average risk, but before 40 for women with a higher risk profile, such as a genetic mutation, family history, a benign breast disease diagnosis, or radiation therapy to the chest at a young age.

    “Women should not take chances. Every woman should get an annual breast cancer screening. Because October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, now is the perfect time to schedule an exam,” said LaSalle Medical Associates CEO Dr. Albert Arteaga.

    Dr. Arteaga himself lost a younger sister to breast cancer when she was in her 40s. “There were three of us,” said Dr. Arteaga. “Our youngest sister never opened up to tell either me or her older sister—both of us being doctors—that she had a lump on her breast. Later we learned that she kept making excuses about it, ‘I bumped myself’ or ‘It’s just a bruise’ and she basically ignored it for over six months.

    “She was in her early 40s and unfortunately, the disease spreads more rapidly in younger women than it does in women who are past menopause, due to female hormones that promote growth. Our family had no history of cancer, and she was otherwise healthy. But at the age of 48 years, six months, and 28 days she died.

    “Once she was diagnosed, she was a good patient, followed her doctors’ orders, and participated fully in her treatment. The cancer metastasized to her brain, and she was able to beat that. But in the end, it spread to her liver, and that was the end.”

    When asked what he would say to women about this tragic disease, Dr. Arteaga said, “Stop living in denial! At the first sign of a lump, make an appointment to see your physician. And make it a habit to get screened every October when breast cancer awareness month comes around, which is a good way to remember it’s time for a routine mammogram.”

     

    LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc., clinics accept Blue Cross, Blue Shield, Molina, Care 1st, Health Net, and Inland Empire Health Plan coverage, as well as Medicare Medi-Cal and cash.

    For more information or to make an appointment call the office closest to you: Fontana (909) 823-4454; San Bernardino17th Street (909) 887-6494; San Bernardino Mt. Vernon Ave. (909) 884-9091; Rialto (855) 349-6019; and Hesperia(760) 947-2161.

    About LaSalle Medical Associates

    LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc. is one of the largest, independent, and Latino-owned healthcare companies in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. The corporate office is in Redlands.

    LaSalle operates six clinics employing more than 100 dedicated healthcare professionals, treating children, adults, and seniors in San Bernardino and Riverside counties. LaSalle’s patients are primarily served by Medi-Cal and Healthy Families. LaSalle also accepts Blue Cross, Blue Shield, Molina, Care 1st, Health Net, and Inland Empire Health Plan (IEHP) coverage.

    LaSalle is also an Independent Practice Association (IPA) of independently contracted doctors, hospitals, and clinics, delivering high-quality patient care to approximately 380,000 patients in Fresno, Kings, Los Angeles, Madera, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Joaquin and Tulare counties.

    Men: It’s Breast Cancer Checkup Time

    Photo Caption: Danny Riggs, a metastatic breast cancer patient, says “Men: if you notice signs of possible breast cancer, it doesn’t mean you’re not a man; it means you need to go see your doctor to get checked. It can save your life. Reach out before you check out.”

    Photo Caption: Danny Riggs, a metastatic breast cancer patient, says “Men: if you notice signs of possible breast cancer, it doesn’t mean you’re not a man; it means you need to go see your doctor to get checked. It can save your life. Reach out before you check out.”

     

     “Men should do the same self-diagnostic routines as women, and if they notice anything that seems questionable, be sure to see your healthcare provider right away. Do not put it off,” says Dr. Albert Arteaga, Chairman of LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc.

    REDLANDS, CALIF. – Every year one in eight women in the United States is diagnosed with breast cancer. And so are one in 833 men! As the nonprofit organization Breastcancer.org notes, “Breast Cancer Awareness Month, held in October every year, aims to promote screening and prevention of the disease.”

    Men don’t usually think about contracting breast cancer, so they don’t do self-examinations or ask their physician for an exam. Carrie Madrid, co-founder and president of The CARE Project and a breast cancer survivor, says, “Men are being ignored and, unfortunately, because men are more likely to be diagnosed after their cancer has progressed to stage 3 or 4, their survival rates are not as good.

    Carrie MadridFounder & President Carrie began The CARE Project Inc., two years after her own Stage III diagnosis. She realized that there weren’t any local organizations providing financial support to patients undergoing treatment. She also wanted to socialize with others in treatment instead of attending a traditional support group.

    Carrie Madrid
    Founder & President
    Carrie began The CARE Project Inc., two years after her own Stage III diagnosis. She realized that there weren’t any local organizations providing financial support to patients undergoing treatment. She also wanted to socialize with others in treatment instead of attending a traditional support group.

    “When men finally start treatment, it often means they can no longer work full-time. Like many women, men may be faced with a choice of paying $100 for a copay or buying groceries. We’re here to help. We can provide assistance with copays, utility bills, rent or mortgage payments…whatever the need may be.”

    In 2021 President Biden declared October 17 to 23 Men’s Breast Cancer Awareness Week. Some 2,800 men will be diagnosed with invasive breast cancer and about 530 will die from it this year, according to the American Cancer Society.

    Symptoms that men should be aware of include a lump or swelling in the breast, redness or flaky skin in the breast, irritation or dimpling of breast skin, nipple discharge and pulling in of the nipple or pain in the nipple area. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention points out that such symptoms can also occur for non-cancerous conditions, so they recommend that if a man has any of these symptoms, he should see a doctor right away.

    “Men should do the same self-diagnostic routines as women, and if they notice anything that seems questionable, be sure to see your healthcare provider right away. Do not put it off,” says Dr. Albert Arteaga, Chairman of LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc.

    “Men should do the same self-diagnostic routines as women, and if they notice anything that seems questionable, be sure to see your healthcare provider right away. Do not put it off,” says Dr. Albert Arteaga, Chairman of LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc.

    Dr. Albert Arteaga, Chairman of LaSalle Medical Associates, encourages all women and men to perform regular breast cancer self-examinations. Women—especially Black women whose breast cancer survival rates are lower than for white women—should also get an annual mammogram.

    Dr. Arteaga says, “Men should do the same self-diagnostic routines as women, and if they notice anything that seems questionable, be sure to see your healthcare provider right away. Do not put it off.”

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office on Women’s Health points out that the survival rate if the disease is caught early is 99 percent!  Routine screening is the key. Many women skipped their annual checkup during the COVID-19 pandemic, so it may be especially important to schedule a screening this October. Men, this means you too!

    LaSalle Medical Associates serves more than 350,000 patients in their clinics and statewide Independent Physicians Association Group (IPA). Patients are covered by Medi-Cal, Medicare and Covered California, as well as those covered by Blue Cross, Blue Shield, Brand New Day, Molina, Care 1st, Health Net and Inland Empire Health Plan (IEHP).

    For clinic locations and more information about LaSalle Medical Associates, call (909) 890-0407 or go online to LaSalleMedical.com.

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    B R I E F: 326 Words

     

    Men: It’s Breast Cancer Checkup Time!

     

    “Men should do the same self-diagnostic routines as women, and if they notice anything that seems questionable, be sure to see your healthcare provider right away. Do not put it off,” says Dr. Albert Arteaga, Chairman of LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc.

    REDLANDS, CALIF. – Every year one in eight women in the United States is diagnosed with breast cancer. And so are one in 833 men! Yes, breast cancer affects both women and men. And because men are more likely to be diagnosed after their cancer has progressed to stage 3 or 4, their survival rates are not as good.

    Carrie Madrid, co-founder and president of The CARE Project and a breast cancer survivor, says, “Men are being ignored and, unfortunately, because men are more likely to be diagnosed after their cancer has progressed to stage 3 or 4, their survival rates are not as good.

    “When men finally start treatment, it often means they can no longer work full-time. We’re here to help. We can assist with copays, utility bills, rent or mortgage payments, whatever the need may be.”

    Symptoms in men include a lump or swelling in the breast, redness or flaky skin in the breast, irritation or dimpling of breast skin, nipple discharge and pulling in of the nipple or pain in the nipple area. These symptoms can also arise for other conditions, so if a man has any of them, he should see a doctor right away.

    Dr. Albert Arteaga, chairman of LaSalle Medical Associates, says, “Men should do the same self-diagnostic routines as women, and if they notice anything that seems questionable, be sure to see your healthcare provider right away. Do not put it off.”

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office on Women’s Health points out that the key to survival is routine screening!

    For clinic locations and more information about LaSalle Medical Associates, call (909) 890-0407 or go online to LaSalleMedical.com.

     

     

    About LaSalle Medical Associates

    LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc. is one of the largest independent and Latino-owned healthcare companies in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. The corporate office is in Redlands.

    LaSalle is also an Independent Practice Association (IPA) of independently contracted doctors, hospitals, and clinics, delivering high-quality patient care to over 350,000 patients in Fresno, Kings, Los Angeles, Madera, Riverside, San Bernardino and Tulare counties.

     

    Volunteer to Keep the Silver Bells Ringing This Holiday Season

    Earl Perkins Rings the bells to raise funds for The Salvation Army to help the Hungry, Homeless and Hopeless this holiday season.

    Earl Perkins Rings the bells to raise funds for The Salvation Army to help the Hungry, Homeless and Hopeless this holiday season.

     

    “This is a wonderful way to help disadvantaged people in our community, simply by volunteering as bell ringers,” said Major Isaias Braga, commander of The Salvation Army of San Bernardino.

     

    SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.— The “miracle” of Christmas is repeated through the joy of caring and sharing. The San Bernardino Salvation Army (www.salvationarmyusa.org) seeks volunteers to Keep the Bells Ringing in the cities of San Bernardino, Redlands, Highland, Rialto, Loma Linda, Colton, Yucaipa, Calimesa, Bloomington, Mentone, Grand Terrace, Muscoy, Big Bear, Lake Arrowhead and Running Springs.

    The nationally recognized shiny red kettles are an integral part of the Christmas scene, with lots of dollars donated each year to aid needy families, seniors and the homeless, in keeping with the spirit of the season.

    “This is a wonderful way to help disadvantaged people in our community, simply by volunteering as bell ringers,” said Major Isaias Braga, commander of The Salvation Army of San Bernardino. “We’re looking for individuals, families and groups to spend a day at one of our more than 30 locations in our area.”

    The Salvation Army begins ringing its bells this year on   Monday November 13th, from 10 am through 6 pm and continues Monday through Saturday until Christmas Eve.

    Many volunteers ring two hours at a time, but groups are asked to provide ringers who can work in shifts for an entire day. Anyone who would like to donate a few hours of their time can volunteer. Individuals under the age of 16 must be accompanied by a parent or guardian.

    Where does the money raised by the ringing bells in San Bernardino go? The Salvation Army provides emergency services including food, housing for homeless or displaced families, clothing and showers, as well as assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available.

    “Last Christmas, The Salvation Army provided 650 holiday food baskets to families and 1,400 children received 5,500 toys,” said Braga. On Christmas Eve, The Salvation Army hosts a Christmas Dinner that provides a delicious meal to approximately 300 people. Donations raised by volunteers who Keep the Bells Ringing help make this possible.

    To volunteer to Keep the Bells Ringing, call The Salvation Army at (909) 888-1336.

    To donate to The Salvation Army online, go to: www.salvationarmyusa.org. To donate by phone call 1-800-SAL-ARMY (800-725-2769).

    Photo Caption: Majors Isaias and Adelma Braga welcome donors to The Annual Red Kettle Kickoff. This year’s event is Wednesday, November 15th, at 5:30 pm at the Bear Springs Events Center,  27923 Highland Avenue, Highland, CA 92346. Click here for tickets.

    Photo Caption: Majors Isaias and Adelma Braga welcome donors to The Annual Red Kettle Kickoff. This year’s event is Wednesday, November 15th, at 5:30 pm at the Bear Springs Events Center,  27923 Highland Avenue, Highland, CA 92346. Click here for tickets.

    Pete Van Helden – Stater Bros. Markets Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board, will deliver the keynote address at the kickoff event for The Salvation Army’s Annual Red Kettle campaign. It all happens on Wednesday, November 15th at 5:30 PM at the Bear Springs Events Center, 27923 Highland Avenue, Highland, CA 92346

    Buy your tickets today at $250 per person.  A table of 8 is just $1,000.  https://give-sc.salvationarmy.org/event/the-salvation-army-or-san-bernardino-red-kettle-kick-off/e429128/register/new/select-tickets

    About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps

    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church and offers holistic programs for individuals in need without discrimination. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has served San Bernardino and the Inland Empire since 1887. The San Bernardino Corps of The Salvation Army serves Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto, and San Bernardino.

    Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY. Our local service number is (909) 888-1336.

     

    Helping Homeless Families Get Back in Control of Their Lives

    “All of us who are part of the Hospitality House team love being able to help families, get back in control of their lives.”

    (San Bernardino, Calif.) The San Bernardino Salvation Army Hospitality House stands ready to house homeless families and single women who need temporary, stable shelter. Their target population also includes multi-generational families, and single men with children as well.

    “The Salvation Army Hospitality House serves as a safe refuge that provides residents with a supportive, caring environment and all the resources they need to deal with a wide variety of personal and/or family problems. It all starts with an emergency shelter that can keep participants safely housed for 30, 60, or 90 days, depending on their circumstances,” says Program Manager Naomi Goforth.

    At intake, each new arrival is assessed by trained Salvation Army intake staff.  Once the scope of a client’s needs has been determined, each family is given a detailed individualized case plan and assigned to a case manager who will maintain close contact during their entire stay.

    Each family’s case plan includes comprehensive goals and objectives that cover their intake, transition to permanent housing, help finding a steady job, legal advocacy, child welfare aid, and education. Every resident is treated as an individual with individual needs and every case is different and gets a customized case plan.

    Amanda and her six children are graduates of the Salvation Army Hospitality House. They now live in there own apartment

    Amanda and her six children are graduates of the Salvation Army Hospitality House. They now live in their apartment

    “People who come to Hospitality House may have been sleeping in their cars or were recently released from a hospital. At intake, each new resident gets clothing, bed linens, hygiene products, and a chance to take a breath after whatever ordeal they have just gone through,” says Goforth.

    “I didn’t know what I was going to do,” says one recent Hospitality House graduate.

    “I’m a single mom and I lost my job during the pandemic. Thank goodness, at least my 15-year-old car was paid off and when we were no longer able to pay rent, that’s where we slept. I heard about Hospitality House from a friend and the people there have helped me find a new job, secure a place to live, and even got me enrolled in a course that’s going to add to my skill set so I can advance in my new-found career.”

    Goforth says, “Our residents don’t just sit around and spin their wheels. They actively work on their case plan. Our case managers are good at finding each individual’s motivation to resolve their homelessness and get back on their feet.”

    The Salvation Army Hospitality House Program Manager Naomi Goforth

    The Salvation Army Hospitality House Program Manager Naomi Goforth

    “Sometimes, that may include a referral to one of our partner agencies for things like mental health services, substance use, and legal aid. Whatever they need, we can either provide help in-house or get them connected to the right providers,” says Goforth.

    As current resident K.L. notes, “I had a pretty bad rent history and I knew not many landlords would want to take a chance on me, even though I now have a decent job. But the Salvation Army has helped me reestablish a better tenant history and now I have a place lined up to move to when my stay here ends next week.”

    In 2023 The Salvation Army served 26,013 people and 24,012 households, serving 110,768 meals, and donating groceries to 12,822 households.

    The Hospitality House provided 34,761 nights of shelter to families and children experiencing homelessness; 2,146 children participated in educational and recreational programs.

    To talk with a Hospitality House representative, call (909) 888-4880 or visit the website at SanBernardino.SalvationArmy.org/ 

    Learn More About the Salvation Army’s Mission

    About the Salvation Army

    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. To donate, call 1-800 SATRUCK.

    The Salvation Army of San Bernardino serves the cities of San Bernardino, Redlands, Highland, Rialto, Loma Linda, Colton, Yucaipa, Calimesa, Bloomington, Mentone, Grand Terrace, Muscoy and Big Bear, Lake Arrowhead and Running Springs.

    Media Contact

    Salvation Army-PR-1214.2  Hospitality House #1

    For interviews or more information call Carl Dameron

    @ (909) 534-9500