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    Black Culture Foundation Announces Winners for Its 2024 Dr. Juanita Scott Humanitarian of the Year Award

    Dr. Marcus Funchess, Assistant Superintendent of Human Resources of the San Bernardino City Unified School District is The Dr. Juanita Scott Humanitarian of the Year Co-Award winner.

    Dr. Marcus Funchess, Assistant Superintendent of Human Resources of the San Bernardino City Unified School District is The Dr. Juanita Scott Humanitarian of the Year Co-Award winner.

     

    Jack B. Clark, Jr., partner at the law firm of Atkinson, Andelson, Loya, Ruud & Romo. he is The Dr. Juanita Scott Humanitarian of the Year Co-Award winner.

    Jack B. Clark, Jr., a partner at the law firm of Atkinson, Andelson, Loya, Ruud & Romo, is The Dr. Juanita Scott Humanitarian of the Year Co-Award winner.

    The awards will be presented at the Black Rose Awards Gala on Friday, February 23 at 5:30 p.m. at the Riverside Convention Center.

    SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF. Feb. 7, 2024 — The San Bernardino Black Culture Foundation announces that Jack B. Clarke, Jr., partner at the law firm of Atkinson, Andelson, Loya, Ruud & Romo, and Dr. Marcus Funchess, Assistant Superintendent of Human Resources of the San Bernardino City Unified School District, have won the 2024 Dr. Juanita Scott Humanitarian of the Year Award.

    Foundation President-elect Carl Dameron said, “We have chosen two outstanding Inland Empire people for the Humanitarian Award this year so that they can be recognized and publicly thanked for their long-time and ongoing service to the people of the Inland Empire.”

    Clarke handles litigation concerning education law, special education disputes, public agency litigation, and other substantial matters. He has successfully defended school districts and other education clients in student disciplinary matters, civil rights and Constitutional claims, and special education due process hearings.

    Clarke was the first African American to chair the board of the Greater Riverside Chambers of Commerce, and he served as chair of the Mayor’s Use-of-Force Review Panel in 1999 following the high-profile police shooting death of Tyisha Miller in Riverside, California.

    His community service contributions have been recognized by the Riverside County Bar Association, California Law Business magazine, the NAACP, the American Diabetes Association, and now the Black Culture Foundation.

    Funchess has served the Inland Empire (IE) as an elementary school teacher from 1998 to 2007, a vice principal from 2007 to 2010 and then principal from 2010 to July 2016 at the Thompson and Henry Elementary Schools, and assistant superintendent of human resources at the San Bernardino City Unified School District (SBCUSD) since August 2020. Funchess also served as Human Resources Director from 2016 to 2020.

    He received his Doctorate in Leadership for Educational Justice from the University of Redlands in 2014. Funchess collaboratively developed the Aspiring Administrator program to grow and develop SBCUSD leaders from within the District. He also helped develop the Golden Bell Award-winning Grow Our Own initiative to educate and hire the next generation of educators from within the community.

    The initiative encourages current SBCUSD students interested in careers in education to pursue their dreams with support from the District, even after leaving high school, and return to SBCUSD to share their knowledge and experience.

    The Black Rose Awards are Friday, February 23, at 5:30 p.m. Tickets are going FAST, get your tickets TODAY: https://sbbcfoundation.org/events/2024-black-rose-awards/

    The Black Rose Awards are on Friday, February 23, at 5:30 p.m. Tickets are available at: sbbcfoundation.org

    “Additional Black Rose Award winners include Acquanetta Warren, Mayor of Fontana; James C. Baker II, Park Commissioner for the City of Moreno Valley; Michael Beauregard, Assistant Manager at Sam’s Club; Tina Darling, Director of Education at American Career College, Ontario, and chair of the Nursing and Health Ministry at New Hope Missionary Baptist Church; and Aristotle McDaniel, founder of GPL-Grandparents Love,” said Foundation President, Ezekiel Adeleke.

    The 31st Annual San Bernardino Culture Foundation Black Rose Awards ceremony takes place on Friday, Feb. 23, starting at 5:30 p.m. at the Riverside Convention Center.

    For tickets to the gala, visit the Black Culture Foundation’s website at:  https://sbbcfoundation.org/events/2024-black-rose-awards/.

    To become a Black Rose Awards sponsor, go to https://blackculturefoundation.square.site/.

    To become a volunteer or board member, send an email to blackrose@sbbcfoundation.org.

    About the Black Rose Awards

    The Black Rose Awards are a complement to Black History Month. The awards are sponsored by the Black Culture Foundation, a nonprofit founded in 1968 by a small group of people who were concerned that, “…nationwide, our school systems have not yet incorporated Black history studies into regular school curriculums. Thus, all students miss the opportunity to learn more about a vital part of this country’s history.”

    The Black Culture Foundation’s purpose “…is to foster an interest and a greater understanding of Black culture, to heighten community awareness of the accomplishments of Black people, past and present, and to plan, coordinate and direct an annual Black History Month parade and related cultural activities…[and] bridge the gaps across cultural lines by bringing the local community together to celebrate this event in the spirit of unity and brotherhood.” The Black Rose Awards are the Foundation’s major cultural event.

    Learn about The Black Rose Awards on Inland Empire Alive

    Learn about The Black Rose Awards on Inland Empire Alive with  Carl M. Dameron:

    For tickets:  https://sbbcfoundation.org/events/2024-black-rose-awards/

    To sponsor https://blackculturefoundation.square.site/

     

    Read morehttps://dameroncommunications.com/2024/01/23/black-rose-culture-foundation-announces-2024-winners/

     

    The Black Rose Awards are Friday, February 23, at 5:30 p.m. Tickets are going FAST, get your tickets TODAY: https://sbbcfoundation.org/events/2024-black-rose-awards/

    The Black Rose Awards are Friday, February 23, at 5:30 p.m. Tickets are going FAST, get your tickets TODAY: https://sbbcfoundation.org/events/2024-black-rose-awards/

    New Ways to Prevent RSV Infections

    RSV's symptoms include runny nose, loss of appetite, coughing, sneezing, fever, and wheezing. In most cases, these symptoms show up in stages, rather than all at once. In very young infants, "the only symptoms may be irritability, decreased activity, and breathing difficulties," per the CDC. Shiane and Shaila Dameron parents use preventive medicine. The children have all of their vaccines and receive checkups with their doctors every six months.

    RSV’s symptoms include runny nose, loss of appetite, coughing, sneezing, fever, and wheezing. In most cases, these symptoms show up in stages, rather than all at once. In very young infants, “the only symptoms may be irritability, decreased activity, and breathing difficulties,” per the CDC. Shiane and Shaila Dameron parents use preventive medicine. The children have all of their vaccines and receive checkups with their doctors every six months.

    “RSV is a cold-like virus that is usually mild but can put some people in the hospital,” says Dr. Cheryl Emoto, Medical Director of LaSalle Medical Associates. “For the first time this fall, young infants and seniors (those with the highest risk for severe disease) now have a way to prevent it.”

    SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF. – A new monoclonal antibody and new anti-viral vaccines are coming for the first time to provide protection against RSV, Respiratory Syncytial (sin-SISH-uhl) Virus. LaSalle Medical Associates clinics will be providing these breakthroughs to patients this fall.

    “RSV is a cold-like virus that is usually mild but can put some people in the hospital,” says Dr. Cheryl Emoto, Medical Director of LaSalle Medical Associates. “For the first time this fall, young infants and seniors (those with the highest risk for severe disease) now have a way to prevent it.”

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention notes that “Most people recover in a week or two, but RSV can be serious. Infants and older adults are more likely to develop severe RSV and need hospitalization. Vaccines are available to protect older adults from severe RSV. Monoclonal antibodies are available to protect infants.”

    The CDC goes on to note that RSV is “one of the most common causes of childhood illness and is the most common cause of hospitalization among infants [emphasis ours].” It usually starts in the fall and peaks in the winter, but this can vary.

    Monoclonal antibodies and vaccines may now prevent RSV. A monoclonal antibody is a clone of a unique white blood cell (white blood cells are the body’s own infection fighters) given to augment and reinforce the body’s natural defenses. It’s the option available for infants who are entering their first RSV season. They are not used when someone already has RSV.

    Up until now, almost all children have contracted RSV by the time they reach 24 months, so the new prevention regimen has the potential to prevent illness and potential complications such as bronchitis and pneumonia, making life easier for both infants and their parents or caretakers.

    For older adults, the CDC estimates that between 60 to 100 thousand are hospitalized every year. resulting in 6,000 to 10,000 deaths. The most at-risk cohorts are older adults, adults with chronic heart or lung disease, those with weakened immune systems or certain underlying medical conditions and residents in nursing homes or long-term care facilities.

    Complications may include asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, a chronic disease of the lungs that makes it hard to breathe), and congestive heart failure—when the heart can’t pump enough blood and oxygen through the body.

    Additionally, this year, there is now a regimen for pregnant women that keeps the developing fetus safe from infection. Now is the time to contact your healthcare provider to schedule an appointment for preventive care, especially if you are pregnant, have an infant under 8 months of age or are 60 years of age or older.

    LaSalle Medical Associates serves more than 350,000 patients in their clinics and statewide Independent Physicians Association Group (IPA) who are covered by Medi-Cal, Medicare, and Covered California, as well as those covered by Blue Cross, Blue Shield, Brand New Day, Molina, Care 1st, Health Net and Inland Empire Health Plan (IEHP).

    LaSalle staff also help people who come into a clinic without any insurance to become enrolled for a variety of state and federal health coverage.

    For more information call (909) 890-0407 or go online to LaSalleMedical.com.

    —30—

    B R I E F: 325 Words

    New Ways to Prevent RSV Infections 

    “RSV is a cold-like virus that is usually mild but can put some people in the hospital,” says Dr. Cheryl Emoto, Medical Director of LaSalle Medical Associates. “For the first time this fall, young infants and seniors (those with the highest risk for severe disease) now have a way to prevent it.”

    SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF. – A new monoclonal antibody and new anti-viral vaccines are coming for the first time to provide protection against RSV, Respiratory Syncytial (sin-SISH-uhl) Virus. LaSalle Medical Associates clinics will be providing these breakthroughs to patients this fall.

    “RSV is a cold-like virus that is usually mild but can put some people in the hospital,” says Dr. Cheryl Emoto, Medical Director of LaSalle Medical Associates. “For the first time this fall, young infants and seniors (those with the highest risk for severe disease) now have a way to prevent it.”

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention notes that “Most people recover in a week or two, but RSV can be serious. Infants and older adults are more likely to develop severe RSV and need hospitalization. Vaccines are available to protect older adults from severe RSV. Monoclonal antibodies are available to protect infants.”

    Monoclonal antibodies and vaccines can now help prevent RSV. A monoclonal antibody is a clone of a unique white blood cell (white blood cells are the body’s own infection fighters) given to augment and reinforce the body’s natural defenses. It’s the option available for infants entering their first RSV season. They are not used when someone already has RSV.

    RSV can lead to severe complications, such as asthma, bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, a chronic disease of the lungs that makes it hard to breathe), congestive heart failure (when the heart can’t pump enough blood and oxygen through the body) and pneumonia.

    For more information call (909) 890-0407 or go online to LaSalleMedical.com.

    About LaSalle Medical Associates

    LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc. is one of the largest independent and Latino-owned healthcare companies in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. The corporate office is in Redlands.

    LaSalle is also an Independent Practice Association (IPA) of independently contracted doctors, hospitals, and clinics, delivering high-quality patient care to over 350,000 patients in Fresno, Kings, Los Angeles, Madera, Riverside, San Bernardino and Tulare counties.

    Looking for Black Heroes and Sheroes in the IE

    Photo Caption: 2023 Black Rose Award Winners - (From left) Accepted for Linda D. Wright; Arlington Rodgers Jr., President of the Black Culture Foundation; Rose Mayes, Humanitarian of the Year honoree; Gloria Macias Harrison, Black Rose awardee; Jim King, Black Rose Chair; Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson, Black Rose awardee; Accepting for San Bernardino Community Hospital Dr. Ruby Skinner, Medical Director, and Roz Nolan, Chief Nurse Executive Officer, and Foundation Treasurer Genevieve Echols.

    Photo Caption: 2023 Black Rose Award Winners – (From left) Accepted for Linda D. Wright; Arlington Rodgers Jr., President of the Black Culture Foundation; Rose Mayes, Humanitarian of the Year honoree; Gloria Macias Harrison, Black Rose awardee; Jim King, Black Rose Chair; Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson, Black Rose awardee; Accepting for San Bernardino Community Hospital Dr. Ruby Skinner, Medical Director, and Roz Nolan, Chief Nurse Executive Officer, and Foundation Treasurer Genevieve Echols. 

    “The Black Culture Foundation Celebrates the 31st Annual Black Rose Awards with our call for entries for the 2024 Black Rose Awards,” said President Ezekiel Adeleke

    SAN BERNARDINO, Calif. – Some people have made a career helping others. And some have done even more than that.

    “If you know someone whose passion is to help and make the community better for others, the Black Culture Foundation wants to know about them. We seek nominations for The Black Rose, Humanitarian of the Year, and Community Service awards,” said Black Culture Foundation President Ezekiel Adeleke.

    “We are looking for someone whose volunteer efforts go over and above their job-related activities,” said Carl M. Dameron Co-chair of the 2024 Thirty-first Black Rose Awards. “These are unsung heroes, people who volunteer with multiple organizations or give all of their spare time to one. They never seek their glory but want to make their community a better place to live.”

    To nominate someone for a Black Rose Award, email Dameron at blackrose@sbbcfoundation.org, or call or text him at (909) 534-9500. Nominations are due by November 30, 2023.

    The awards program focuses on the Black community in the Inland Empire, Dameron says, but an award winner need not be a resident of the IE. Many community leaders in law enforcement, education, and other public venues have been recognized and received an award in honor of the work they’ve done that benefits the Inland Empire.

    To become a volunteer or board member, call or text Dameron at (909) 534-9500 or email him at blackrose@sbbcfoundation.org, Nominations are due by November 30, 2023.

    The 31st Black Rose Awards ceremony takes place on Saturday, February 3, at Rhe Riverside Convention Center.

    About the Black Rose Awards

    The Black Rose Awards are a complement to Black History Month. The awards are sponsored by the Black Culture Foundation, a nonprofit founded in 1968 by a small group of people who were concerned that, “…nationwide, our school systems have not yet incorporated Black history studies into regular school curriculums. Thus, all students miss the opportunity to learn more about a vital part of this country’s history.”

    The Black Culture Foundation’s purpose “…is to foster an interest and a greater understanding of Black culture, to heighten community awareness of the accomplishments of Black people, past and present, and to plan, coordinate and direct an annual Black History Month parade and related cultural activities…[and] bridge the gaps across cultural lines by bringing the local community together to celebrate this event in the spirit of unity and brotherhood.”

    The Black Rose Awards are the Foundation’s showcase cultural event.

    Twelve individuals and groups being honored at regional education summit

    The “Toward a Shared Vision Awards” ceremony will occur on Thursday, October 26th, at the Riverside Convention Center. Hosted by Growing Inland Achievement (GIA), a local nonprofit, the awards recognize contributions to educational attainment and economic success in the Inland Empire.

    Dr. Sorrel Stielstra, Director of Research for GIA, addresses participants in a breakout room.https://flic.kr/p/2nVatVPPhoto byGIA

    RIVERSIDE, CA — Seven individuals and five groups will be recognized for their work in driving Inland Empire’sducational and economic success.

    The Toward a Shared Vision Awards ceremony is set for Thursday, Oct. 26, at the Riverside Convention Center.

    “The Toward a Shared Vision Awards recognizes individuals and groups making significant contributions to educational attainment and economic success in the Inland Empire region while embodying core values of equity, transformation, collaboration, innovation, and centering students,” said Ann Marie Sakrekoff, Interim CEO of Growing Inland Achievement (GIA), the local nonprofit hosting the awards celebration.

    “We received twenty-five nominations for individuals and groups throughout the region, all of which are well-deserving candidates,” said Sakrekoff. “GIA brought together a diverse panel of representatives from local education and community-based organizations who deliberated and selected 12 individuals and groups to be recognized across six categories.”

    The awardees are:

    Children Deserve Success Program, San Bernardino County Superintendent of SchoolsPhoto by Gby GIA. Tomas MoralesPhoto by GIby GIA Student-Centered Excellence:

    • Group: Children Deserve Success Program, San Bernardino County Superintendent of Schools

    • Individual: Dr. Tomás D. Morales, President, California State University, San Bernardino

    Ontario-Montclair Promise ScholarsPhoto byGIA

    Assemblymember Sabrina Cervantes, California’s 58th Assembly DistrictPhoto by GIAby GIAxcellence in Regional Transformation:

    • Group: Ontario-Montclair Promise Scholars

    • Individual: Assemblymember Sabrina Cervantes, California’s 58th Assembly District

    College FuturesPhoto byGIAby GIAHenry ShannonPhoto by GIA

    Fby GIAity-Focused Excellence:

    • Group: College Futures Foundation

    • Individual: Dr. Henry D. Shannon, Superintendent/President, Chaffey College

    Kim McNultyPhoto by GIA

    Maby GIAHope Happen FoundationPhoto by GIA

    Foby GIAellence in Regional Collaboration:

    • Group: Making Hope Happen Foundation

    • Individual: Kim McNulty, Vice President of Regional Strategy, OneFuture Coachella Valley

    California State University San BernardinoPhoto by GIA

    Ivaby GIAPhoto by GIA

    For by GIAlence in Innovation:

    • Group: Office of Pre-College Programs, California State University, San Bernardino

    • Individual: Dr. Ivan Peña, Dean of Student Services and Counseling, Crafton Hills College

    Dr. Judy WhitePhoto by GIA

    For Eby GIAence in Regional Leadership:

    • Individual: Julie Pehkonen, Chair, Inland Empire/Desert Regional Consortium

    • Individual: Dr. Judy D. White, President/Founder, MOSAIC, Retired 12th Superintendent of Schools for Riverside County

    The awards ceremony is scheduled for October 26 at 2 p.m. as a culminating program of the two-day Toward a Shared Vision regional summit. Tickets for the full two-day summit can be purchased for $129. A day-two-only ticket, including the recognition ceremony, can be purchased for $65. Ticket sales will contribute to GIA’s student scholarship fund. Learn more about the awards and register to attend on GIA’s website: https://inlandempiregia.org/tasv-2023-awards/.

    Since 2015, Growing Inland Achievement has been actively supporting educational attainment and economic success in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. To learn more about their mission and initiatives, please visit InlandEmpireGIA.org.

    It’s Time for Your Flu Shot

    Time for your annual Flu vaccine.  Nurse Elisabeth gives Mia-Alexia Martinez 14 her annual Flu vaccine.

    Time for your annual Flu vaccine. Nurse Elisabeth gives Mia-Alexia Martinez 14 her annual Flu vaccine.

     

    “The Centers for Disease Control tells us that September and October are good times to get vaccinated against the flu,” says Dr. Albert Arteaga.

    SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF. – Winter is flu season, but fall is the time to be prepared. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) says, “For most people … September and October are generally good times to get vaccinated…[but] it’s important to know that vaccination after October can still provide protection during the peak of the flu season.”

    For the 2023-2024 flu season, the CDC continues to recommend annual influenza vaccination for all persons 6 months of age and older. Of particular concern are persons who are either very young, the elderly, or those who have chronic health conditions that put them at greater risk for complications from the flu—these people should not delay in getting their flu vaccines.

    LaSalle Medical Direct Dr. Cheryl Emoto says, “Parents should take note of the fact that babies, those 6 months of age and older, need to get vaccinated as soon as they are old enough and children younger than 8 years old (including those babies) who are receiving their flu vaccine for the first time, will need a second dose four weeks after the first dose.”

    LaSalle Medical Director Dr. Cheryl Emoto

    LaSalle Medical Director Dr. Cheryl Emoto

    Younger babies can be protected by parents and caregivers getting their flu vaccine, by so-called “herd immunity.” If parents do not get sick with the flu, the babies are also unlikely to get the flu.

    For those over 65 years of age, there are higher-dose vaccines available that provide additional protection for the elderly. And for healthy individuals ages 2-49 years, there is a nasal spray available as a painless option. The nasal spray is just as effective as the injection.

    The CDC notes a common misconception some people have is that a flu vaccine can give you flu, but that is not the case. Flu shots are made with “inactivated” (killed) viruses, or with only a single protein from the flu virus. The nasal spray vaccine contains live viruses that are attenuated (weakened) so that they will not cause illness,” says the CDC.

    We should have flu vaccine available in the clinic by early September and we encourage everyone to get their flu vaccine.

    LaSalle Medical Associates serves people covered by Medi-Cal, Medicare, and Covered California, as well as those covered by Blue Cross, Blue Shield, Molina, Care 1st, Health Net, Inland Empire Health Plan (IEHP), and Brand New Day. LaSalle staff have been trained to help people who come into a clinic without any insurance to get signed up for whatever coverage they qualify for.

    For clinic locations and more information about LaSalle Medical Associates, call (909) 890-0407 or go online to lasallemedicalassociates.com.

    —30—

    B R I E F: 230 Words

    It’s Time for Your Flu Shot

     “The Centers for Disease Control tells us that September and October are good times to get vaccinated against the flu,” says Dr. Albert Arteaga.

    SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF. – Winter is flu season, but fall is the time to be prepared. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) says, “For most people … September and October are generally good times to get vaccinated…[but] it’s important to know that vaccination after October can still provide protection during the peak of the flu season.”

    LaSalle Medical Direct Dr. Cheryl Emoto says, “Parents should take note of the fact that babies, those 6 months of age and older, need to get vaccinated as soon as they are old enough and children younger than 8 years old (including those babies) who are receiving their flu vaccine for the first time, will need a second dose four weeks after the first dose.”

    LaSalle Medical Associates serves people covered by Medi-Cal, Medicare, and Covered California, as well as those covered by Blue Cross, Blue Shield, Molina, Care 1st, Health Net, Inland Empire Health Plan (IEHP), and Brand New Day. LaSalle staff have been trained to help people who come into a clinic without any insurance to get signed up for whatever coverage they qualify for.

    For clinic locations and more information about LaSalle Medical Associates, call (909) 890-0407 or go online to lasallemedicalassociates.com.

    —30—

    About LaSalle Medical Associates

    LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc. is one of the largest independent and Latino-owned healthcare companies in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. The corporate office is in Redlands.

    LaSalle is also an Independent Practice Association (IPA) of independently contracted doctors, hospitals, and clinics, delivering high-quality patient care to approximately 365,000 patients in Fresno, Kings, Los Angeles, Madera, Riverside, San Bernardino, and Tulare counties.

     

    LaSalle-PR-342.3 Flu Shot

    For More Information call

    Dr. Greg Zerovnik @ (909) 730-8428

    or email Greg.Z@DameronCommunications.com

     

    Duane E. Whittington Leaves Beaver Medical Group and Joins LaSalle Medical Associates as New CEO

    Dr. Albert Arteaga, MD, Chairman of LaSalle and Duane E. Whittington new Chief Executive Officer of LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc.

    Dr. Albert Arteaga, MD, Chairman of LaSalle and Duane E. Whittington new Chief Executive Officer of LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc.

    “LaSalle has grown from one patient to more than 350,000,” says Albert Arteaga, MD, Chairman of LaSalle Medical Associates, “and we want to grow more, so we’ve hired a seasoned CEO to help us get to the next level.”

    SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF. – LaSalle Medical Associates has hired Duane E. Whittington as their new Chief Executive Officer. “We conducted a very thorough search,” says Albert Arteaga, MD, Chairman of LaSalle, “and we were pleased to find a highly qualified local candidate with extensive medical practice management experience.”

    During his 15-plus-year tenure as CAO with Beaver Medical Group, he founded EPIC Health Plan and developed it from its birth to maturity. In June 2021 he was promoted to Chief Executive Officer, overseeing a $700 million enterprise serving 110,000 HMO members.

    Whittington, 55, earned his Bachelor of Business Administration degree from York University in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, and his MBA from Pepperdine. After graduating from Pepperdine, he was hired as Executive Director for Pacific Physician Services in Redlands.

    He then served as Regional Vice President for First Physician Care in Atlanta, Georgia, followed by a move back to Southern California as a healthcare and technology consultant with Tustin-based The Capitalist Group, LLC.

    Whittington next returned to Redlands as Chief Operations Officer for Inland Health Organization for six years before joining EPIC Management/Beaver Medical Group, as Senior Vice President, and Chief Administrative Officer, responsible for the Accountable Care Services Division.

    “I was approached about a leadership position at LaSalle, an organization I knew had been providing services for over 30 years in the Inland Empire. Due to a recent change in ownership where I was working at the time, I decided to pursue the opportunity,” says Whittington.

    “I met with Dr. Arteaga, the Founder and President of LaSalle. He shared his vision and goals for LaSalle, building on the rich tradition of providing quality healthcare to families with courtesy and respect. Frankly, I found the opportunity to join a physician-led, community-focused provider group to be compelling.

    “I’m super excited to take this position with a truly unique organization. Dr. Arteaga is a remarkable physician-leader and I am looking forward to helping him grow his organization and take it to the next level,” said Whittington.

    Dr. Arteaga says, “We feel very fortunate to add Duane Whittington to our senior executive team. His extensive experience in the healthcare industry as a chief operating officer and chief executive officer showed he was the right choice, right from day one. We are looking forward to benefitting from his management and leadership experience as we continue to grow.”

    LaSalle Medical Associates serves more than 350,000 patients in their clinics and statewide Independent Physicians Association Group (IPA) who are covered by Medi-Cal, Medicare, and Covered California, as well as those covered by Blue Cross, Blue Shield, Molina, Care 1st, Health Net and Inland Empire Health Plan (IEHP).

    LaSalle staff also help people who come into a clinic without any insurance to become enrolled for a variety of state and federal health coverage.

    For clinic locations and more information about LaSalle Medical Associates, call (909) 890-0407 or go online to LaSalleMedical.com.

    —30—

    B R I E F: 307 Words

    LaSalle Medical Associates Announces a New CEO

     “LaSalle has grown from one patient to more than 350,000,” says Albert Arteaga, MD, Chairman of LaSalle Medical Associates, “and we want to grow more, so we’ve hired a seasoned CEO to help us get to the next level.”

    SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF. – LaSalle Medical Associates has hired Duane E. Whittington as Chief Executive Officer. “We conducted a very thorough search,” says Albert Arteaga, MD, President of LaSalle, “and we found a highly qualified local candidate with extensive medical practice management experience.”

    Whittington, 55, earned his MBA from Pepperdine. After graduating, he served as Executive Director for Pacific Physician Services in Redlands. He went on to serve as a C-suite executive for several healthcare organizations from Redlands to Atlanta, to Tustin, and back again to Redlands in 2000 as COO for Inland Health Organization.

    In 2006 Whittington joined EPIC Management/Beaver Medical Group, as Senior Vice President, and Chief Administrative Officer, responsible for the Accountable Care Services Division. In June 2021 he was promoted to CEO, overseeing a $700 million enterprise serving 110,000 HMO members.

    “With a recent ownership change where I was,” says Whittington, “I started to think about making a change. When I was approached about a leadership role at LaSalle, it turned out the timing was right. Dr. Arteaga shared his goals and intentions and I have to say that I’m super excited to take this position with a truly unique organization. I am looking forward to helping Dr. Arteaga grow his organization and take it to the next level,” said Whittington.

    Dr. Arteaga says, “We feel fortunate to have Duane Whittington on our team. We look forward to benefitting from his management and leadership experience as we continue to grow.”

    For clinic locations and more information about LaSalle Medical Associates, call (909) 890-0407 or go online to LaSalleMedical.com.

    About LaSalle Medical Associates

    LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc. is one of the largest independent and Latino-owned healthcare companies in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. The corporate office is in Redlands.

    LaSalle is also an Independent Practice Association (IPA) of independently contracted doctors, hospitals, and clinics, delivering high-quality patient care to over 350,000 patients in Fresno, Kings, Los Angeles, Madera, Riverside, San Bernardino and Tulare counties.

    LaSalle-PR-343.5 New CEO at LaSalle Medical

    For More Information call

    Dr. Greg Zerovnik @ (909) 730-8428

    or email Greg.Z@DameronCommunications.com

     

    LaSalle Clinics Are Ahead of the Curve in Ending Race-Based Medicine

    Dr. Albert and Maria Arteaga

    Dr. Albert and Maria Arteaga, Founders of LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc. dedicated to ending health care disparities.

    “People of color are tired of being treated differently by doctors because of their skin color. At LaSalle, we pride ourselves on treating all patients with respect and giving them the care, they need, regardless of their ethnicity,” said Dr. Albert Arteaga, MD, founder and CEO of LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc.

    (Redlands, Calif.)  The American Academy of Pediatrics has announced that it is revising its policies and guidelines to do away with wording that implies or suggests “that races have underlying biological differences that should be factored in medical treatments.”

    In a new policy statement, “Eliminating Race-Based Medicine,” pre-published online May 2, 2022, in Pediatrics, the AAP observes that race is a historically derived social construct that has no place as a biologic proxy. Over the years, the medical field has inaccurately applied race correction or race adjustment factors in its work, resulting in differential approaches to disease management and disparate clinical outcomes.

    “The American Academy of Pediatrics is taking an important step toward dismantling race-based medicine. This effort calls for acknowledging the impact that differential lived experiences have on individual and population health outcomes through a race-conscious health equity lens rather than through approaches that have inappropriately identified skin color as an independent risk-adjusting variable,” Dr. Wright said.

    “Social determinants of health need to be carefully considered in the development of care delivery strategies including factors embedded in broad categories such as access, the physical environmental and community supports. Evidence informed incorporation of these factors is vital in all areas of medicine.”

    Dr. Albert Arteaga, MD, CEO of LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc., says, “As a Latino-owned organization, we have always treated every patient—adult or child—with the most conscientious and rigorous care.

    Many of our doctors and support staff are themselves minorities and they know very well how important it is to make all patients feel comfortable and to deliver to all patients the highest standard, the gold standard, of care.”

    The gold standard of care is a method, procedure or measurement that is widely accepted as being the best available to test for or treat a disease.

    Race-based care has been pervasive for decades. One example is how some pediatricians deal with Black children who may be suffering from a urinary tract infection. According to Dr. Joseph L. Wright, M.D., M.P.H., FAAP, from American Academy of Pediatrics, rather than apply the gold standard test, they use a lesser procedure because they assume that Black children don’t get urinary tract infections as often as white children.

    But that is not the case at LaSalle. “When we interview prospective providers, we make sure that they are in sync with our values and standards,” says Dr. Arteaga. “The gold standard is the only standard we apply to the people under our care.”

    After two years of virtual doctor visits, all of LaSalle six clinics are open for person-to-person patient visits. Clinics are now open in San Bernardino, Rialto, Fontana, Hesperia and Victorville.

    “The evolution of modern medicine has produced incredible advancements and accomplishments in health care,” Dr. Wright said. “But we must acknowledge and address the stark inequities that persist in leaving vulnerable populations behind. We are better than this. Now is the time for change.”

    For more information or to make an appointment at a LaSalle Medical Associates Clinic call 1-855-349-6019. Fontana, San Bernardino 17th Street, San Bernardino Mt. Vernon Ave., Rialto and Hesperia.

    About LaSalle Medical Associates

    LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc. is one of the largest, independent, and Latino-owned healthcare companies in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. The corporate office is in Redlands.

    LaSalle operates six clinics employing more than 100 dedicated healthcare professionals, treating children, adults and seniors in San Bernardino and Riverside counties. LaSalle’s patients are primarily served by Medi-Cal and Healthy Families. LaSalle also accepts Blue Cross, Blue Shield, Molina, Care 1st, Health Net, and Inland Empire Health Plan (IEHP) coverage.

    LaSalle is also an Independent Practice Association (IPA) of independently contracted doctors, hospitals, and clinics, delivering high quality patient care to approximately 365,000 patients in Fresno, Kings, Los Angeles, Madera, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Joaquin, and Tulare counties.

    LaSalle-PR-316.2 Gold Standard Care

    For More Information call

    Dr. Greg Zerovnik @ (909) 730-8428‬

    or email Greg.Z@DameronCommunications.com

    Fixing Healthcare Disparities to Improve the Lives of Latinos and Blacks

    April Reya a medical assistant, gives the COVID-19 vaccination shot to Vicki Creighton, of Riverside, at the LaSalle Medical Associates medical office located in Rialto, Calif.  (Photo by Valda Wilson)

    April Reya a medical assistant, gives the COVID-19 vaccination shot to Vicki Creighton, of Riverside, at the LaSalle Medical Associates medical office located in Rialto, Calif.  (Photo by Valda Wilson)

     

    “Looking for the telltale signs of illness or chronic conditions during a routine checkup requires a high level of doctor-patient communication, along with comprehensive tests that can detect problems before they worsen and become harder to treat,” said Dr. Albert Arteaga, pediatrician and CEO of LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc.

                                                                                                                         

    SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF. Preventive medicine works to reduce poor healthcare outcomes for Latinos and Blacks and the underserved when healthcare providers go the distance to make sure their patients get it. “As a Latino-owned healthcare provider, we use CDC-approved treatment schedules to make sure our patients get the healthcare they need,” says Dr. Albert Arteaga, President and CEO of LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc.

    A 2019 research paper in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found that “Racial/ethnic mortality disparities persist and are widening for some age groups.” The age groups where disparities trended worse included the youngest and oldest. This trend reversed what had been a lessening in disparities from 2009 to 2012.

    Latino-owned LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc. works to reverse this downward trend and get Latino and Black patients back on track toward parity in improved health and well-being for the very young and seniors and this starts with its annual checkup outreach program.

    “We believe that improved healthcare for all of our patients begins with a robust outreach program that contacts people to remind them when it’s time to come in for their checkup, annual for adults and more often for children 1 to 4,” said Dr. Albert Arteaga, pediatrician and CEO of LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc.

    Maria and Dr. Albert Arteaga. The California Medical Association awarded Dr. Albert Arteaga the “Ethnic Physician’s Leadership Award,” recognizing his contributions to medical care in the Latino community.

    Maria and Dr. Albert Arteaga. The California Medical Association awarded Dr. Albert Arteaga the “Ethnic Physician’s Leadership Award,” recognizing his contributions to medical care in the Latino community.

    Looking for the telltale signs of illness or chronic conditions during a routine checkup requires a high level of doctor-patient communication, along with comprehensive tests that can detect problems before they worsen and become harder to treat.

    “Many of our adult clients, especially Latinos, seem to think that if they feel okay, they don’t need to see a doctor. Conditions like type 2 diabetes, hepatitis C, and some cancers can be ‘hiding out,’ so to speak, and by the time the patient starts to notice symptoms, it can be too late,” says Dr. Arteaga.

    Dr. Arteaga adds that this is especially a problem with infants and young children who are not yet able to communicate clearly. Parents might think their child is just being fussy or going through the “terrible twos” and put off taking their little one to the doctor until severe symptoms start showing.

    Infants need to get examined even more regularly. Heatlh.gov says children from ages 1 to 4 should see a doctor or nurse at 12, 15, 18, 24, and 30 months, and at 3 and 4 years. Early child development needs to be tracked carefully so that any warning signs of developmental problems can be addressed promptly and effectively.

    Children all grow and develop at different rates. Some start talking sooner, some later. What’s required is a good overall assessment to determine if the child is on the right track. Health.gov concludes, “If you’re worried about your child’s health, don’t wait until the next scheduled visit—call the doctor or nurse right away.”

    For more information or to make an appointment, call 1-855-349-6019.

    Photo Caption: Nurse Elisabeth with gives patient Eduaido Torres age 13 a vaccine.

    Photo Caption: Nurse Elisabeth with gives patient Eduaido Torres age 13 a vaccine.

    About LaSalle Medical Associates

    LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc. is one of the largest independent and Latino-owned healthcare companies in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. The corporate office is in Redlands.

    LaSalle is also an Independent Practice Association (IPA) of independently contracted doctors, hospitals, and clinics, delivering high-quality patient care to approximately 365,000 patients in Fresno, Kings, Los Angeles, Madera, Riverside, San Bernardino, and Tulare counties.

    Two-County Education Collaborative Appoints Ann Marie Sakrekoff as Interim President & CEO

    Photo Caption: Ann Marie Sakrekoff facilitates a leadership workshop on local education challenges and opportunities. Sakrekoff leads the two counties consortium to expand our educated workforce, thriving communities, and a vibrant economy that creates prosperity for all. Photo by Jake Poore.

    Photo Caption: Ann Marie Sakrekoff facilitates a leadership workshop on local education challenges and opportunities. Sakrekoff leads the two counties consortium to expand our educated workforce, thriving communities, and a vibrant economy that creates prosperity for all. Photo by Jake Poore.

     

    INLAND EMPIRE, CA – Ann Marie Sakrekoff has been named Interim President & CEO of Growing Inland Achievement (GIA), effective May 15, following the retirement of Dr. Carlos Ayala.

    GIA serves San Bernardino and Riverside Counties as a regional, cross-sector network of education, government, nonprofit and business partners in the Inland Empire; collectively, they work towards a shared vision of educational and economic success.

    Sakrekoff has over 20 years of higher education and nonprofit leadership experience, including her current role as GIA’s Chief Operating Officer.

    Sakrekoff stated, “I am proud and excited to take on the Interim CEO role during such an exciting time for GIA as we continue building on our service to the Inland Empire educational network of students, families, institutions, and community partners. GIA will remain focused on its mission, impact, and growth while we search for our next permanent CEO.”

    Diana Rodriguez, GIA Board Member and Chancellor of the San Bernardino Community College District praised Sakrekoff’s experience.

    “Ann Marie’s passion for helping Inland Empire students achieve their college dreams is truly inspiring. With her deep understanding of the challenges facing students in the region, she is committed to ensuring that every student has access to the resources they need to succeed,” said Rodriguez.

    “Whether through innovative programming, advocacy efforts, or community outreach, Ann Marie is dedicated to making a meaningful difference in the lives of our students. Her unwavering commitment to this cause has made her an invaluable asset to Growing Inland Achievement, and we are confident that under her leadership as Interim CEO, the organization will continue to make great strides in improving educational outcomes for students throughout the Inland Empire,” Rodriguez added.

    Sakrekoff was the first employee hired by GIA’s Board of Directors in 2005, helping to lead the organization since its inception.

    “Ann Marie has served as the operations leader for the GIA since its early days. She has been a steady force and an excellent collaborative leader focused on advancing our region’s higher education and workforce goals,” said Sheila Thornton, GIA Board Member and CEO of OneFuture Coachella Valley. “Her dedication to student success is evident throughout her work. We’re grateful to Ann Marie for being willing to serve in this interim position.”

    GIA’s board of directors anticipates launching a search for a permanent President & CEO in the coming months.

    “Ann Marie is an exceptional leader poised to continue GIA’s efforts to increase equitable educational attainment in the Inland Empire,” said Dr. Kim Wilcox, GIA Board Chair and Chancellor of UC Riverside. “The board fully believes in her abilities to lead the organization while we search for a permanent CEO.”

    Growing Inland Achievement, serves San Bernardino and Riverside Counties, in a regional cross-sector network of education, government, nonprofit, and business partners in the Inland Empire, bringing more than $20 million and collectively working towards a shared vision of educational and economic success.

    About Growing Inland Achievement

    Growing Inland Achievement, serves San Bernardino and Riverside Counties, in a regional cross-sector network of education, government, nonprofit, and business partners in the Inland Empire, collectively working towards a shared vision of educational and economic success.

    GIA staff support this work by researching issues and opportunities, developing financial resources for the region, and connecting diverse stakeholders across the two-county region of the Inland Empire.

    GIA’s vision is that by 2035, San Bernardino and Riverside Counties will be widely recognized for their educated workforce, thriving communities, and vibrant economy that creates prosperity for all.