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    Arboleda Senior Apartments Manager Has A Heart for Seniors

    Bath tubs and showers

    Bath tubs and showers at Arboleda are very accessible with built in shower seats, several handrails and adjustable shower heads to aid seniors in comfort and necessity.

     

    (La Puente, Calif.) Resident Manager Selina R. Chavira can’t wait to meet all her new neighbors and begin creating a community where seniors can live their best lives when the Arboleda Senior Apartments open this summer in La Puente.

     

    “I have a real heart for seniors,” she said. “I was very close to my grandparents, and they were very special to me. I want to create a very special place where seniors can be healthy, happy and safe.”

     

    The Arboleda Senior Apartments feature a mix of one- and two-bedroom apartments for seniors 62 and better. The 74-unit apartment community includes a large community room, fitness center, computer center, and library. Other senior-friendly amenities include an interior mail room, laundry room on each floor, corridors with secure handrails and two elevators.

     

    Chavira will live and work at Arboleda with its beautiful Spanish-style architecture.

     

    The upscale 74-unit Arboleda Senior Apartment community is contracting with EngAGE, a non-profit organization that takes a whole-person approach to community and creative, healthy aging by providing arts, wellness, lifelong learning, community building and intergenerational programs to seniors. 

    Construction continues at the Arboleda apartments. High quality wood cabinets are installed with not just luxury in mind but practicality. While wood cabinets cost a little more in construction, they last for 30 years noticeably reducing maintenance and repair costs.

     

    EngAGE is an experienced organization that already serves thousands of seniors and families living in affordable senior and multi-generational apartment communities. At Arboleda, programs will be provided on-site for residents at no charge 

     

    Programs like these are key to building beneficial community connections, as Chavira knows first-hand.

     

    “One of my grandmothers lived in a senior community for several years, and she was very close to the people who lived there. She went to the jewelry-making classes and enjoyed the birthday celebrations, games and yard sales where seniors made crafts and sold them.

     

    “My grandma loved crocheting beanies for cancer patients and preemies, and they even gave her an award for her work,” Chavira said.

    Arboleda Senior Apartments

    “The Spanish-style buildings are beautiful, the coverings over the windows are really quaint and I like all the iron decorations on the property,” said Selina R. Chavira, resident manager of Arboleda Senior Apartments. “The iron-work designs are very striking.”

     

    “She loved being part of that community. She loved making friends and sharing interesting activities with her neighbors,” Chavira said. “We’re going to do that at Arboleda!”

     

    Selina Chavira is also looking forward to showing off Arboleda Senior Apartments to her parents when they visit in August for a family event.

     

    “My family lived just down the street,” Chavira said. “My parents are very active and they love the area. They love hiking the trails at nearby Schabarum Regional Park.

     

    “They’ll see that the Arboleda Senior Apartments are definitely a central place close to everything seniors need — medical offices, stores to shop, public transportation, a Post Office, pharmacies and restaurants,” she said.

    two types of balcony with wrought iron railings

    The upscale 74-unit Arboleda Senior Apartment community includes two types of balcony with wrought iron railings, a large community room, fitness center, computer center, and library. Other senior-friendly amenities include an interior mail room, laundry room on each floor, corridors with secure handrails and two large elevators.

     

    For more information on Arboleda Senior Apartments, go to ArboledaSeniorApts.com or call Resident Manager Selina Chavira at (626) 423-6695. 

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    Reparations Finally Comes to America

    The Dameron family 1965 in E. St. Louis, IL. Barbara, Carl T., Crystal (baby), Denise, Carl and Kathleen. “We we integrators,” said Katheleen Dameron.

    “When you look at the history of redlining, the history of denying Black people and Native Americans the right to housing, this is a significant step in saying, ‘Yes, we did do wrong,’ and when you do someone wrong, you apologize and you make amends,” Dameron said. “That is the beginning of the healing process.” 

    (Paris, France). A Chicago suburb recently became the first city in the United States to agree to pay Black residents reparations for slavery and past discriminatory policies and practices.

    That decision shows that some communities are beginning to recognize and acknowledge the harm caused by America’s systemic racism, an expert on race relations said.

    “It’s a historic decision to do this, and we’re hoping that this is the beginning of people being able to open their minds, open their eyes to what’s happened in the past and the consequences today,” said Kathleen Dameron, an internationally recognized cross-cultural trainer.

    The City Council of Evanston, Illinois, recently voted to distribute $400,000 in housing assistance and mortgage relief to eligible Black households. The city will provide $25,000 for down payments on houses or property, home repairs, and interest or late penalties on property in Evanston.

    To qualify, residents must either have lived in the city between 1919 and 1969 or be a direct descendant of a black Evanston resident from that time. Those who experienced housing discrimination in Evanston after 1969 are also eligible.

    The $400,000 comes from a $10 million reparations fund created in 2019 using tax money from the city’s recreational marijuana program.

    “When you look at the history of redlining, the history of denying Black people and Native Americans the right to housing, this is a significant step in saying, ‘Yes, we did do wrong,’ and when you do someone wrong, you apologize and you make amends,” Dameron said. “That is the beginning of the healing process.”

    Even though $25,000 is not enough to pay for a house, paying reparations is still important for the city, said Dameron, a Black American now living in Paris.

    “It’s not reparations in the sense of, ‘We denied you a house, so we’re going to give you a house now,’ but it is acknowledgement of the damage done, of the impact on the generations of that damage,” Dameron said. “It recognizes and it acknowledges that we did harm consciously, in policy, in law and in practice and we’re seeking to recognize it and to make amends.”

    Dozens of other U.S. cities are also considering reparations. On March 29, Providence, Rhode Island, released a 194-page report on racism, another step in the city’s efforts to pay reparations to Black and Native American residents.

    Dameron said that getting national reparations or getting some areas to agree to reparations is still a difficult process.

    “One of the problems we have is that there are some people in the United States – and this happens consistently across the United States – they would rather close the swimming pool and have no swimming pool in the community than to have Blacks have access to the swimming pool, so as desegregation started throughout the South, public swimming pools disappeared, public parks disappeared,” she said.

    “Some people thought, “I’d rather have nothing than have Back people share in this,” she said.

    “That mentality makes it extraordinarily difficult to say, ‘We did you wrong. As human beings, we did not give you a fair environment. We persecuted you. We banned you. We burned your houses down and we killed people.’ ”

    So even though Evanston is making amends and recognizing and acknowledging that they caused harm, “that acknowledgement is still difficult for many Americans to make,” Dameron noted.

    Dameron is currently leading a series of seminars on “Healing the Collective Trauma of Racism.” In her sessions, she helps participants recognize the difference between interpersonal and institutional racism.

    Participants  build a feeling of community and energy to create social justice.

    To introduce people to her sessions, she is offering a free, self-paced, one-hour course. You can learn more by going to www.KathleenDameron.com

    -end-

    Should America “be less white” Is Coca-Cola’s Training Right?

    I can understand how being told to be less white hits you in your identity, because I was told be less Black.

    “I understand people’s anger at being told to be less white,” said internationally recognized cross-cultural trainer Kathleen Dameron. “Be less white. What are the qualities?

    “I have a lot of empathy for people being told to be less white,” she said. “I know it hurts. As a Black child and as a grown-up, I have been told to be less Black, straighten your hair, dress to look like a nice corporate person. I can understand how being told to be less white hits you in your identity, because I was told be less Black.”

     

    (Paris, France)   Americans should not get upset over reports saying Coca-Cola was asking its employees to “be less white” as part of its mandatory diversity training.

    “I understand people’s anger at being told to be less white,” said internationally recognized cross-cultural trainer Kathleen Dameron. “Be less white. What are the qualities?

    “Be less oppressive. Where’s the problem? Listen more. What’s the problem? Be less defensive. where’s the problem?” she asked. “But people get upset the minute they hear, ‘Be less white,’ because it hits them in their identity. It hurts and they reject it.”

    Dameron said it might be more effective to say, “We’re asking you to create a JEDI society, to create Justice, Equality, Dignity and Inclusion.”

    The training course at the center of the Coca-Cola backlash was titled “Confronting Racism.” It advised whites to listen more and be less oppressive, less arrogant, less certain, less defensive and less ignorant,” according to the New York Post.

    Coca-Cola denies that it was part of their required training.

    “That’s not the point,” said Dameron, who has more than 30 years’ experience training American, European and Asian executives worldwide but is not involved in the disputed training.

    “Coca-Cola should have said, ‘We are committed to a fair, equal workplace environment,’” she explained. “It’s not corporate training that makes workplaces fair. It’s offering equal pay and equal opportunities for hiring and advancement regardless of race or gender. That’s how you change.”

    Dameron understands why the issue triggered some people’s emotions.

    The Dameron family 1965 in E. St. Louis, IL. Barbara, Carl T., Crystal (baby), Denise, Carl and Kathleen. “We we integrators”

    “I have a lot of empathy for people being told to be less white,” she said. “I know it hurts. As a Black child and as a grown-up, I have been told to be less Black, straighten your hair, dress to look like a nice corporate person. I can understand how being told to be less white hits you in your identity, because I was told be less Black.”

    Dameron is currently leading a series of seminars on “Healing the Collective Trauma of Racism.” In her sessions, she helps participants recognize the difference between interpersonal and institutional racism and build a feeling of community and energy.

    To introduce people to her sessions, she is offering a free, self-paced, one-hour course. You can learn more by going to www.KathleenDameron.com

    -end-

    5 Tips for Being the Face of Your Company

    Carl M. Dameron
    Carl M. Dameron Founder and creative director of Dameron Communications Photo by Robert A. Whitehead/CSUSB

    (San Bernardino, Calif.) Any company’s success is still often dictated by its portrayal in the traditional media.

    “For a company to really take off, it needs to be accessible to members of the press. So, instead of just sending out a press release every week, a company should be ready to reach out for interviews and provide quotes and soundbites to the media,” said Carl M. Dameron founder of Dameron Commercials.

    Establishing a face of the company is also a critical step in becoming media friendly. Whether it’s the CEO or an upper-level manager, the person representing the company should know the ins and outs of the industry and much more.

    Here are the five tips that everyone needs to follow when appearing on-camera. Most of it is good advice if we have lined up a print media interview for you as well, or even a phone interview.

    Dress Properly

    It might sound shallow, but people generally judge others based on how they look. So, decide how you want your company to be perceived by the audience and dress accordingly.

    For men, a suit and tie is the safest route to go. For women, it’s best to avoid vibrant clothing, excessive make up, and bulky jewelry as to not distract the viewers’ attention.

    Don’t come in with hair that’s too disheveled and covering your face – to be the face of a company, you need to proudly show off your face.

    In general, a clean, professional look should always work in most on-camera interview situations.

    Do Your Homework

    Once you get an opportunity to appear on camera (or on radio or print), you should portray yourself as an expert in not just your company, but in the industry as well.

    We will check to see if you can get the questions ahead of time, or at the least, find out what topics will be covered within the interview.  We will submit recommended questions when you have a broadcast interview, but it is up to the interviewer what questions are asked. The more prepared you are, the less likely it is that the words “Uh,” “Um,” and “You know” will make up your diction.

    Ignore the Bright Lights and Production Crew

    If you’re on TV there will probably be bright lights shining on you throughout the interview and there might even be a production team moving around in your line of vision. However, the cameras don’t pick up all the chaos going on behind the scenes.

    If you’re taking part in a one-on-one interview, your eyes and focus should be on the person conducting the interview. Averting your attention away from the interviewer for even a few seconds makes it seem like you’re disinterested, zoning out and lost.

    Avoid Industry Jargon

    When speaking about your business or industry, it’s best to use terms that everyone can understand, and take the time to explain industry terms in simple language. That way, people who are first learning about your company or industry will have an easier time of knowing what the heck you’re talking about.

    Be A Professional

    If you’re ever confronted by the interviewer with a question you’re uncomfortable answering, stay collected and take some time to craft a response. Simply saying “no comment” in a calm tone is much better than getting into a potential shouting match with the person in control of the interview. Plus, you don’t want to be on the wrong end of what could become a viral video in this day and age of YouTube.  

    -end-

    It’s not To Late to Make A Happy Christmas for A Needy Child

     

    Arlene and Priscilla Delgado, ages 4 and 8, each used their savings to purchase Christmas toys for a less fortunate child through the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corp’s Giving Tree program at Inland Center Mall. Help the Salvation Army obtain more toys for children in need by going to the Giving Tree by Dec. 24. Photo by Kelly Silvestri-Raabe

     
    (SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.)  It’s not to late to make a Happy Christmas for a child.  Giving a toy to a needy child. It a small gesture, but participating in The Salvation Army’s Giving Tree will make this Christmas memorable for children in need.  Without your help, some children won’t get anything for Christmas.

    “Just pick up an Angel Giving Tree tag and buy a needy child the gift listed on the tag! The Angel Giving Tree matches donors with hundreds of children who are relying on The Salvation Army this year to bring them a Merry Christmas,” said Major Daniel Henderson, Corps officer for the San Bernardino Salvation Army.

    The San Bernardino Corps Giving Tree is at Inland Center Mall in San Bernardino, 500 Inland Center Drive in San Bernardino, 92408.  Donations received here provide toys to children from 300 disadvantaged families in San Bernardino, Rialto, Highland, Grand Terrace, Colton, Fontana and Bloomington.

    “Please support disadvantaged children with a Christmas gifts at the Giving Tree by visiting our table in the Inland Center Mall and fulfilling the wishes of a child till December 24th,” said Lt Cathie McCully.

    Shoppers find cards attached to the Giving Tree. These cards include the names and wish lists of needy children whose families cannot afford to buy gifts. Shoppers simply pluck a tag off the Giving Tree and head for the appropriate store to purchase their gift donations, then return it to the Giving Tree volunteers.
    Shoppers get to keep the card as an ornament to hang on their own Christmas tree, reminding them of their good deed.

    “This is a great way to start a tradition with your family, by selecting a gift for a needy child together. The gifts are based on their individual wishes and for some children, it may be the only gift they receive all year,” said Lt McCully.

    “Soccer balls, dolls and clothes are just a few items on each child’s wish list,” said Major Henderson. “Shoppers who participate in the program are encouraged to shop for more than what is needed on the list. I can’t think of a better way for local people including business owners and managers to help the community and spread the spirit of Christmas.”

    For more information on the Giving Tree call (909) 888-1336 or visit the tree in the Inland Center Mall in San Bernardino.   To donate money by phone call 1-800-SAL-ARMY (800-725-2769).  Donate on line at: WesternUSA.SalvationArmy.org

    About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps
    The Salvation Army may provide emergency services including food; lodging for homeless or displaced families; clothing and furniture; assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) assists rescue workers and evacuees in such disasters as fires.

    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and offers evangelical programs for boys, girls and adults. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY. Our local number is (909) 888-1336.

    -end-

    Free Thanksgiving Day Dinner At The Salvation Army for 138 Years

     

    Volunteers serve Thanksgiving Dinner at The Salvation Army: Serving on the food line (left to right) is Nancy Veaegas, Niyahn Summey, Walt Summey, and Robert Sanchez. We are ready for Christmas Dinners.

    Volunteers serve Thanksgiving Dinner at The Salvation Army: Serving on the food line (left to right) is Nancy Veaegas, Niyahn Summey, Walt Summey, and Robert Sanchez. We are ready for Christmas Dinners.  Photo by Ricardo Tomboc.

     
    (SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.) – Salvation Army chapters throughout the Inland Empire will serve Thanksgiving Day meals, to all that attend including those who are without fa ily or unable to provide a full-course turkey dinner for themselves.

    The San Bernardino Corps has served Thanksgiving dinner for 138 years.

    “We are pleased to prove God’s spirit of giving and provide a Thanksgiving Day dinner to those in need,” said Major Henderson, corps officer at the San Bernardino Corps. “We also welcome those who are familiar with the many other services we offer throughout the year.”

    The San Bernardino Corps is the dinner at the Corps new headquarters at 2626 Pacific Avenue, San Bernardino, where it moved in August of 2015.

    At many locations, including the San Bernardino Corps, these meals take place from 11 a.m.to 1 p.m., or until food runs out. Some locations will offer meals earlier and/or later in the day.

    The Salvation Army relies mostly on donations, so food will vary somewhat at locations, but will include turkey or chicken, pies, stuffing or rice, cranberry sauce, pies, cakes, greens, and other side dishes.
    “We always have plenty of donations for Thanksgiving, but if you’d like to bring some non-perishable food it is always welcomed,” said Major Henderson.

    “In addition to our Thanksgiving Day meal, we serve dinners to about 75 homeless women and children every day, and to some 25 men who are currently taking advantage of our cold-weather shelter in the evenings,” said Lt. Cathie McCully

    Chef Richie

    The Cook Richie shows of his work sliced Turkey Brest ready to be served. Photo by Ricardo Tomboc

    Six nights a week, we serve meals close to 200 hungry people, some who are homeless and some who have a place to live, but need help with food to pay for everything else.

    “The Salvation Army, San Bernardino will be giving toys for hundreds of children and 600 families holiday food baskets a few days before Christmas,” said Lt. McCully
    Other corps of The Salvation Army also plan Thanksgiving meals. Call one of the phone numbers listed below learn the time and location of meals in your area.

    • San Bernardino, 2626 Pacific Avenue, (909) 888-1336. Thursday, November 24 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
    • Riverside, 3695 First Street, (951) 784-3571. Wednesday, November 23 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
    • Redlands, 838 Alta St., (909) 792-6868. Thursday, November 24 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
    • Moreno Valley, 14075 Frederick St., (951) 653-9131. Thursday, November 24 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
    • Ontario, 1412 S. Euclid Ave., (909) 986-6748. Thursday, November 24 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
    • Victorville, 14585 La Paz Drive, (760) 245-2545. The Victorville Corps has traditionally served two Thanksgiving dinners, one at its headquarters and another in Apple Valley at the James A. Woody Community Center on 13467 Navajo Road.  Both meals are served Thursday, November 24 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
    • Hemet, 340 S. Palm Ave., (951) 791-9495. Thursday, November 24th 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

    If you wish to be a volunteer to help the Salvation Army this Thanksgiving and Christmas season, please call The Salvation Army nearest you or call (909) 888-1336.

    About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps
    The Salvation Army may be able to provide emergency services including food; lodging for homeless or displaced families; clothing and furniture; assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) assists rescue workers and evacuees in such disasters as fires.

    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and also offers evangelical programs for boys, girls and adults. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY. Our local number is (909) 888-1336.

     -end-

    All photos by Ricardo Tomboc, Salvation Army board member

    Salvation Army: Resources Needed to Aid Families in Transition

     

    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and also offers evangelical programs for boys, girls and adults. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY or (909) 888-1336.

    Volunteers help serve 52,504 free, hot, nutritious meals were served to the hungry from The Salvation Army in San Bernardino. Now the corps needs help to fund services.


    San Bernardino, Calif. – The Inland Empire branch of the Salvation Army today issued an urgent appeal to the community for resources to provide support to area families in need. The San Bernardino Citadel Corps, which serves Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto and San Bernardino, is reporting a financial deficit of $45,000 (now $90,000), citing a shift in contributions following the December 2 terrorist attack.
    The public is encouraged to donate money, food, and goods and services to help replenish Salvation Army coffers, and to consider including the Salvation Army in their charitable giving and estate plans. Contributions can be made online at www.SalvationArmyUSA.org or by calling 1-800-SAL-ARMY.
    “The Salvation Army is proud to have been a part of the community outpouring of support to the victims and families affected by the December 2 tragedy,” said Anne Metu, program director for the organization’s Transitional Living Center. “Now, we are asking the community to help us rebuild our resources so that we can continue providing assistance to families with urgent needs for food, shelter and child care.”
    Metu cited an example of a family—a mother and her six children, ages 3 to 13—who relied on the Salvation Army Emergency Shelter and Transitional Living Program when evicted from their home: “Mona” and the children’s father had separated and she did not have sufficient income to house, feed and clothe the family.
    After a short stay in the shelter, she found employment and was accepted into transitional housing, but soon lost her job when she could not find childcare during the children’s Spring Break from school. With support from the staff and residents at the Transitional Living Program, Mona was able to return to work and was soon reunited with the children’s father.
    Mona and her husband now live in affordable housing as a family unit and the children continue to participate in Salvation Army youth programs, mentoring other children who are faced with similar life circumstances.
    Since 1887, the San Bernardino Corps has helped residents of the San Bernardino area overcome life’s challenges. Its current service area is San Bernardino, Highland, Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace and Rialto.
    Donations may always be made online at www.SalvationArmyUSA.org, or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY.
    For help or for more information call Ms. Anne Metu, Program Director at the Transitional Living Center, (909) 888-4880 or anne.metu@usw.salvationarmy.org or visit the Website at: www.salvationarmyusa.org
    About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps
    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and also offers evangelical programs for boys, girls and adults. One of the largest, and most effective, charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination.

    -end-

    Time for Summer Cleaning – Send Unwanted Items to the Salvation Army

     The Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Center of San Bernardino always seeks donations of clothes and other household items, both large and small, to supply its seven Family Stores. Money raised by sale of household items at the Family Stores, and of cars and other vehicles at its warehouse, fund the Adult Rehabilitation Center’s drug and alcohol rehabilitation program. To donate, call 1-800 SATRUCK. Photo by Chris Sloan

    The Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Center of San Bernardino always seeks donations of clothes and other household items, both large and small, to supply its seven Family Stores. Money raised by sale of household items at the Family Stores, and of cars and other vehicles at its warehouse, fund the Adult Rehabilitation Center’s drug and alcohol rehabilitation program. To donate, call 1-800 SATRUCK. Photo by Chris Sloan


     
    Patricia Luna, warehouse supervisor, prices clothing donated to the Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Center. The Adult Rehabilitation Center seeks donations of all household items for its seven Family Stores, proceeds of which fund the drug and alcohol rehabilitation program. Photo by Chris Sloan

    Patricia Luna, warehouse supervisor, prices clothing donated to the Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Center. The Adult Rehabilitation Center seeks donations of all household items for its seven Family Stores, proceeds of which fund the drug and alcohol rehabilitation program. Photo by Chris Sloan


     (SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.) Summer has arrived, which means it’s time for summer clean up ! Get rid of unwanted appliances, furniture, clothes and other items easily by calling 1-800 SATRUCK (1-800-728-7825) to arrange for The Salvation Army to pick them up. Or visit our website at www.satruck.org .
    What’s no longer useful to you may be just what a thrift store bargain-shopper falls in love with, or may be exactly what a family needs but can’t afford to buy in a department store.
    “No matter who buys them, donations to the local Salvation Army Family Stores, purveyors of fine used goods, will use the money to help men to overcome drug or alcohol addiction,” said Lt. Regina Verdugo, administrator.
    “We need donations of every kind,” said Jack Katzman, member of San Bernardino’s Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Center Advisory Board. “We receive no other funds, and these days, donations are at an all-time low.”
    “You can donate cars, trucks, boats, clothing, toys, furniture, appliances and even property,” said Katzman.
    The Salvation Army will send a truck to pick up donations from most addresses. The donations can be small or large, as long as they fit into huge the delivery trucks.
    Donors also can bring small items to any of The Salvation Army’s Family Stores, or larger items, such as cars, to the Adult Rehabilitation Center warehouse, which has a location in San Bernardino at 363 S. Doolittle Road.
    San Bernardino’s Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Center operates five Family Stores, in San Bernardino, Fontana, Redlands, Hesperia and Victorville.
    The Family Stores raise almost all of the program’s revenue and teach the rehabilitation center’s residents new job skills, thus helping them become more productive members of society after they complete the program. The beneficiaries learn the value of working hard, cooperating with others and having goals.
    Men in San Bernardino County or Pomona Valley who are seeking help to overcome drug or alcohol addiction should call the Adult Rehabilitation Center in San Bernardino at (909) 889-9605. The Salvation Army offers a similar program for men in Riverside County; for more information about that program, call (951) 940-5790.
    Women who want help ending drug or alcohol addiction can call Adult Rehabilitation Centers for them by calling the center in Anaheim at (714) 758-0414, or the center in San Diego at (619) 239-4037.
    About the Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Center
    The Adult Rehabilitation Center is a six-month social model program, which combines a comprehensive rehabilitation program and work therapy for men who wish to overcome drug or alcohol addiction. These men attend individual and group counseling, substance abuse education, 12-Step meetings, and learn about stress management, anger management, parenting and overcoming addiction, as well as spiritual counseling. Re-entry and alumni supports services are also provided. Many recreational activities are also provided, which alumni can continue after their treatment as part of a sober lifestyle.
    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. To donate, call 1-800 SATRUCK.
     

    -end-

     
     

    Practicing For Disaster – The Salvation Army SATERN Field Day

    Paul Bennet practices emergency communications at a previous SATERN field day. During the event Ham Radio operators practice to provide the Inland Empire with communications during a disaster.

    Paul Bennet practices emergency communications at a previous SATERN field day. During the event Ham Radio operators practice to provide the Inland Empire with communications during a disaster.


    Yucaipa, Calf. – The Salvation Army Emergency Service Satern Amateur Radio Network Field Day will be June 25-26, beginning at 11 am Saturday and running through 11am. Sunday, at Yucaipa Community Park located at 34900 Oak Glen Road Yucaipa, CA 92399.
    The event is sponsored by the Salvation Army Emergency Service of Riverside and San Bernardino Counties.
    Experienced local amateur radio operators will be at the event to mentor and provide instruction on radio operation in a disaster. Various amateur radio project demonstrations and displays will also be available.
    “Field Day is the most popular on-the-air event held annually in the US and Canada. More than 35,000 radio amateurs gather with their clubs, groups, or simply with friends to operate from remote locations,” said Major Daniel Henderson.
    Field Day is part educational event, part operating event, and part public relations event. The goal is to put together a self-sufficient, working radio stations, quickly and begin making as many contacts as possible in a 24-hour period. The operators simulate emergency conditions, operating portable equipment on emergency power with temporary antennas.
    Often called “ham radio,” the Amateur Radio Service has been around for a century. In that time, it has grown into a worldwide community of licensed operators using the airwaves with every conceivable means of communications technology.
    Ham radio members range in age from youngsters to grandparents. Even rocket scientists and a rock star or two are in the ham ranks. Most, however, are individuals who enjoy learning and being able to transmit voice, data and pictures through the air to unusual places, both near and far, without depending on commercial systems.
    The Amateur Radio frequencies are the last remaining place in the usable radio spectrum where individuals can develop and experiment with wireless communications. Hams not only can make and modify their equipment, but can create whole new ways to do things.
    Amateur radio has been called into action again and again to provide communications in crises when it really matters. Amateur radio people are well known for their communications support in real disaster and post-disaster situations.
    The Salvation Army Emergency Service has been effective in establishing emergency communications nets during floods, hurricanes, fires, earthquakes, and other major disasters.  It’s a way to communicate in an emergency, even with a loss of electricity or cellphone service.
    Whether you are a licensed amateur radio operator or just interested in learning more about amateur radio, come and visit the Salvation Army Satern field operation for ARRL Field Day on June 25 and 26. There is no charge to attend.
    For more information call Contact: Jan Pettit, Field Day Chairman at (951) 487-8118.
     
    About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps
    The Salvation Army provides emergency services including food, lodging for homeless or displaced families, and single women; clothing and furniture; and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) assists rescue workers and evacuees in such disasters as fires.
     
    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and also offers evangelical programs for boys, girls and adults. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY. Our local number is (909) 888-1336.
     

    -end-

     

    Practicing For Disaster – SATERN Field Day

    Paul Bennet practices emergency communications at a previous SATERN field day. During the event Ham Radio operators practice to provide the Inland Empire with communications during a disaster.

    Paul Bennet practices emergency communications at a previous SATERN field day. During the event Ham Radio operators practice to provide the Inland Empire with communications during a disaster.


    Yucaipa, Calf. – The Salvation Army Emergency Service Satern Amateur Radio Network Field Day will be June 25-26, beginning at 11 am Saturday and running through 11am. Sunday, at Yucaipa Community Park located at 34900 Oak Glen Road Yucaipa, CA 92399.
    The event is sponsored by the Salvation Army Emergency Service of Riverside and San Bernardino Counties.
    Experienced local amateur radio operators will be at the event to mentor and provide instruction on radio operation in a disaster. Various amateur radio project demonstrations and displays will also be available.
    “Field Day is the most popular on-the-air event held annually in the US and Canada. More than 35,000 radio amateurs gather with their clubs, groups, or simply with friends to operate from remote locations,” said Major Daniel Henderson.
    Field Day is part educational event, part operating event, and part public relations event. The goal is to put together a self-sufficient, working radio stations. quickly and begin making as many contacts as possible in a 24-hour period. The operators simulate emergency conditions, operating portable equipment on emergency power with temporary antennas.
    Often called “ham radio,” the Amateur Radio Service has been around for a century. In that time, it has grown into a worldwide community of licensed operators using the airwaves with every conceivable means of communications technology.
    Ham radio members range in age from youngsters to grandparents. Even rocket scientists and a rock star or two are in the ham ranks. Most, however, are individuals who enjoy learning and being able to transmit voice, data and pictures through the air to unusual places, both near and far, without depending on commercial systems.
    The Amateur Radio frequencies are the last remaining place in the usable radio spectrum where individuals can develop and experiment with wireless communications. Hams not only can make and modify their equipment, but can create whole new ways to do things.
    Amateur radio has been called into action again and again to provide communications in crises when it really matters. Amateur radio people are well known for their communications support in real disaster and post-disaster situations.
    The Salvation Army Emergency Service has been effective in establishing emergency communications nets during floods, hurricanes, fires, earthquakes, and other major disasters.  It’s a way to communicate in an emergency, even with a loss of electricity or cellphone service.
    Whether you are a licensed amateur radio operator or just interested in learning more about amateur radio, come and visit the Salvation Army Satern field operation for ARRL Field Day on June 25 and 26. There is no charge to attend.
    For more information on how to find a wood floor refinishing new york company call Contact: Jan Pettit, Field Day Chairman at (951) 487-8118.
     
    About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps
    The Salvation Army provides emergency services including food, lodging for homeless or displaced families, and single women; clothing and furniture; and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) assists rescue workers and evacuees in such disasters as fires.
     
    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and also offers evangelical programs for boys, girls and adults. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY. Our local number is (909) 888-1336.
     

    -end-