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    Top 10 Workouts for Seniors with Hypertension

     

    Safe Workouts for Seniors in Managing Hypertension

    As we age, staying active becomes crucial for our overall health. For seniors dealing with hypertension in their advanced years, exercising safely and effectively is vital. Physical activity can help eliminate and manage high blood pressure, improve heart health, and boost overall well-being. Here are the top 10 safe and effective workouts recommended for seniors with hypertension. 

     10 Safe Workouts for Seniors:

    1. Walking: Walking is a great exercise that’s easy on your joints. It’s a simple way to get active. Try to walk briskly for about 30 minutes on most days. Being consistent is essential. But if 30 minutes seems like too much, start with shorter walks. Then, slowly increase the duration. This way, your body gets used to it, and it feels easier over time.
    1. Swimming: Water exercises are remarkable for older adults with high blood pressure. Swimming laps or joining water aerobics gives your whole body a great workout without causing any strain on your joints. The way the water supports your body also eases the pressure on your muscles, making it easier and safer to move around. This gentle and effective exercise in the water is a fantastic choice for seniors with hypertension.
    1. Cycling: Whether pedaling on a stationary bike inside or cruising outdoors, cycling is an excellent way for seniors with hypertension to pump their hearts. It’s gentle on the joints and won’t strain or hurt them. Plus, the best part is that they’re in charge! They can decide how fast or slow they want to go. When they begin, they should take it in a friendly and easy way, and as they get more comfortable, they can add more time and speed to their rides. This way, they can enjoy the ride and feel good about getting more robust with each pedal.
    1. Yoga: Yoga is a fantastic exercise involving gentle movements that stretch and strengthen your body. It also focuses on breathing in a way that helps you relax and reduce stress. Certain yoga poses, like the mountain pose, where you stand tall and strong, the seated forward bend stretching your back, and gentle twists that help your body feel more flexible can benefit seniors with high blood pressure. These poses are simple and can be adjusted to suit your comfort level. Doing yoga regularly helps you feel calmer and more relaxed while also helping with managing your blood pressure.
    1. Tai Chi: Tai Chi, an ancient Chinese practice passed down through generations, focuses on slow, graceful movements and deep breathing. The gentle flow of Tai Chi movements is like a soothing dance, promoting better balance, flexibility, and relaxation for seniors. This exercise isn’t just about physical activities; it’s also about finding peace within yourself. Plus, Tai Chi can reduce high blood pressure and strengthen your heart. So, it’s good for your muscles and joints, kindness, and overall health.
    1. Resistance Band Exercises: Resistance bands are like stretchy ropes that help you get stronger without making your body work too hard. Older adults can do many exercises using these bands to strengthen different muscles. You can improve your arm muscles (like lifting a grocery bag), boost your legs (like climbing stairs), and even sit down while strengthening your back muscles. These bands are gentle but mighty!
    1. Pilates: Pilates is a kind of exercise that pays a lot of attention to making your mid-region strong, helping you to bend easily, and keeping your body in a good position. It’s a workout that doesn’t stress your body and can be changed to fit what you can do. Doing Pilates can make you better at balancing and staying steady, which is essential for older people with high blood pressure.
    1. Chair Exercises: For seniors who like to or need to exercise while sitting down, chair workouts are a fantastic choice. These exercises cover a wide range, from simple leg lifts to gentle arm circles, all of which can be done comfortably from a seated position. They’re fantastic for improving strength and flexibility without needing to stand up or put pressure on your joints. They’re tailored to keep you comfortable while making a big difference in how strong and flexible you feel.
    1. Strength Training: Light weights or everyday items found in the home, such as water bottles or cans, can be helpful for strength training. These makeshift weights are perfect for exercises focusing on significant muscles like the arms, legs, and core. However, ensuring your weights are not too heavy or uncomfortable is crucial, especially for seniors with hypertension. Choosing safe and easy-to-handle weights is essential to prevent strain or injury while working out.
    1. Mindfulness and Meditation: Mindfulness and meditation can be super helpful for seniors dealing with high blood pressure. These stress-busting methods can play a significant role in keeping blood pressure under control. Relaxing your mind and body can make a real difference in managing hypertension and staying healthy. So, even though they’re not the typical workouts, these calming practices can significantly help seniors.
    Albert Arteaga, M.D., President of LaSalle Medical Associates.

    Albert Arteaga, M.D., President of LaSalle Medical Associates.

    Before starting any new exercise routine, seniors with hypertension should consult their healthcare provider. Additionally, here are some essential tips to ensure a safe and enjoyable workout experience:

    • Stay hydrated throughout your exercise sessions.
    • Warm up before exercising and cool down afterward to prevent injury.
    • Listen to your body, and don’t push yourself too hard.
    • Monitor your blood pressure regularly, especially before and after workouts.
    • Wear comfortable clothing and supportive footwear.

    Seniors with hypertension | LaSalle Medical Associates

    At LaSalle Medical Associates, we understand the critical role of staying active in managing hypertension among seniors. Pay attention to the power of regular exercise in controlling blood pressure and enhancing overall health. Discover enjoyable activities tailored to your fitness level –the key to making a difference in hypertension management and improving your quality of life.

    Remember, starting your journey towards an active lifestyle is never too late. Explore various exercises to find what suits you best. Prioritize your well-being by listening to your body and consulting our healthcare professionals before starting any new workout routine. Your health and safety matter most as you progress towards a healthier, more vibrant life. Contact us for your well-being now!

    About LaSalle Medical Associates

    LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc. is one of the largest independent and Latino-owned healthcare companies in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. The corporate office is in Redlands.

    LaSalle is also an Independent Practice Association (IPA) of independently contracted doctors, hospitals, and clinics, delivering high-quality patient care to more than 350,000 patients in Fresno, Kings, Los Angeles, Madera, Riverside, San Bernardino and Tulare counties.

    A First for Black Media: Black Voice News Leverages Web 3 and Blockchain Technology to Combat Racism in California

    Combating Racism as a Public Health Crisis platform leverages web recorder screen capture technology to centralize California declarations as a resource and accountability tool

    RIVERSIDE, Calif. – In response to the murder of George Floyd, many government agencies and leaders across California declared racism a “public health crisis.”

    While the declarations are a starting point, Mapping Black California, a project of Black Voice News and the first Black newspaper to build and report on a Web3-based project, wants to see these promises put to work.

    “These resolutions are an important first step to advancing racial equity and justice and must be followed by allocation of resources and strategic action,” Mapping Black California Project Manager, Alex Reed, contends.

    The team found their answer in phases with the first being to track any public records and public statements made by elected officials regarding the declarations. The second phase, supported by a fellowship from Stanford University’s Starling Lab for Data Integrity, provided funding to integrate Web3 authentication technology to track, verify, and report on the progress of the commitments outlined in those declarations. The culmination – a fully integrated, content-aggregated platform developed by ESRI to track and centralize declarations in California.

    “It’s not just about keeping up with new technologies, it’s also about ensuring Black communities aren’t being influenced by misinformation or disinformation campaigns,” explained Black Voice News publisher and Mapping Black California founder Dr. Paulette Brown-Hinds.

    Dr. Paulette Brown-Hinds

    Dr. Paulette Brown-Hinds

    Using the platform’s analysis of more than 40 declarations made by local and state jurisdictions across the state, Black Voice News health equity reporter Breanna Reeves wrote a four-part series analyzing how four different regions across California – specifically the city of Oakland, the city of Santa Cruz, and Riverside, and San Bernardino Counties – carried out public health crisis declarations made in 2020, examining them against criteria from the American Public Health Association.

    The aim is to hold local governments accountable to the promises outlined in their respective declarations by encapsulating their resolutions in an authenticated archive that cannot be deleted or modified.

    “Such technology and tools are not only essential for holding those in power accountable for their promises,” Reeves states, “but are also great tools for journalists like myself to use to verify documents I receive for reporting, or webpages I link to. Unlike a screenshot or a link to a Tweet, using web recorder technology ensures that such information cannot be tampered with and has been authenticated.”

    By preserving over 350 web pages from government sites and public platforms, Combating Racism displays data to track these commitments and help investigators hold leaders and organizations accountable for pledges made to take action against systemic inequality.

    “Even in the first few months of building the project, several of these pages on the live web had disappeared before they could be preserved.”

    “As a journalist, it’s dismaying to see so many news organizations close and with them, their archives,” noted Ann Grimes, director of journalism fellowships at Starling Lab. “The problem extends to social media – where tweets often disappear or are deleted. Embeds from social media can be taken down at any time, as they are hosted by the website or company that originally published them.”

    “Creating a centralized digital ledger registered on a blockchain to preserve the declarations and corresponding materials related to them is a comprehensive resource for concerned community members to determine a particular jurisdiction’s declaration status, assess their progress, and identify a particular jurisdiction’s equity contact (if assigned),” Grimes explained.

    “Providing California residents with easily accessible data and additional resources empowers them not just to ask, “Now What?”, but more importantly, “What have you done? What’s next?”

    According to Mapping Black California Project Director, Candice Mays, “As the tools used to inflict racism upon our communities continue to evolve, we must not just evolve with them, but ahead of them and our Combating Racism platform is an exercise in that evolution.”

    To explore the platform and read the Black Voice News series, visit: combatingracism.com

    To learn more about Black Voice News’ data journalism unit, Mapping Black California, visit:mappingblackca.com

     

    For media inquiries, please contact:

    Candice Mays

    Project Director

    Mapping Black California

    Phone: (951) 682-6070

    Email: candice@voicemediaventures.com

    Little Sunshine Foundation Helps Students Pay for AP Test Fees and Supplies

    Little Sunshine Foundation Youth Ambassadors at a community outreach event on July 27, 2019. From left to right: Emma Hernandez, Marissa Lepe, Monique Vobecky, Emma Garcia, Kylee Vergo, Ema Perez.

    Little Sunshine Foundation Youth Ambassadors at a community outreach event on July 27, 2019. From left to right: Emma Hernandez, Marissa Lepe, Monique Vobecky, Emma Garcia, Kylee Vergo, Ema Perez.

     

     

    The Little Sunshine Foundation’s Annual Casino Night Fundraiser is at the Glendora Woman’s Club on June 22, 2024, at 5 p.m.

     

    GLENDORA, CALIF. —  The Little Sunshine Foundation is a nonprofit run entirely by volunteers. The Foundation provides low-income youth with the resources they need to improve their quality of life through literacy and sports programs. They also train young adults to reinvest in their community. The Foundation believes that every child deserves a little sunshine in their life.

    The Sunshine Royale Casino Night fundraiser takes place on June 22, 2024, at 5 p.m. at the Glendora Woman’s Club in Glendora.

    “We need your help preparing today’s youth to be the leaders of tomorrow and create a positive spirit of community service,” said Bianca Vobecky, Director of the Foundation.

    Last year, the Foundation provided 500 backpacks filled with school supplies, sports equipment, new or gently used books and reading tools to improve reading proficiency, and $3,000 in Advanced Placement (AP) grants for select high schools to help parents pay the $98 AP test fee.

    Bianca explained that if a student wants to take five AP class qualifying tests, it will cost them nearly $500. In some cases, parents may have to choose between buying food for their family or paying for AP test fees. The grants help to reduce the financial burden and allow more students the opportunity to pursue higher education.

    Fourteen-year-old Monique Vobecky started the Little Sunshine Foundation in 2018. She has a lifelong passion for academics and sports and created the Foundation because she believes “that every child deserves a little sunshine in their life.”

    Monique is now a junior at Harvard University majoring in pre-med and plans to become a neurosurgeon. Thanks to Zoom and FaceTime Monique is still actively involved in the Foundation. “You don’t have to be rich or old to make a difference,” said Bianca, Monique’s mom and the Foundation’s director.

     

    Youth Ambassadors and Celebrities at Little Sunshine Foundation’s “An Afternoon of Jazz” fundraiser, Sept. 22, 1019. Front row from left to right: Emma Garcia, Emma Perez, Evelyn Luang, Emma Hernandez. Back row from left to right: Jay Vobecky, Giovanni Perez, Jennifer Long, Emile Lam, three-time Gold Medalist Leah O’Brien Amico, Monique Vobecky, Actor James Pickens Jr., Amanda Zurla, Gabrielle Braganza, Emily Millward, Kylee Vergo.

    Youth Ambassadors and Celebrities at Little Sunshine Foundation’s “An Afternoon of Jazz” fundraiser, Sept. 22, 1019. Front row from left to right: Emma Garcia, Emma Perez, Evelyn Luang, Emma Hernandez. Back row from left to right: Jay Vobecky, Giovanni Perez, Jennifer Long, Emile Lam, three-time Gold Medalist Leah O’Brien Amico, Monique Vobecky, Actor James Pickens Jr., Amanda Zurla, Gabrielle Braganza, Emily Millward, Kylee Vergo.

     

    The Little Sunshine Foundation received the “Nonprofit of the Year” award in 2019 from the Glendora Chamber of Commerce. They continue to set an example for how local charities can improve their communities. Every year the Foundation’s programs provide financial assistance to approximately 2,000 students in Los Angeles County and the Inland Empire.

    The fundraiser features casino-style excitement with favorites like blackjack, roulette, poker, craps, Texas Hold ’em, and live entertainment, a buffet dinner, and a dessert bar. For those that don’t play casino games, there’ll be Bingo where every number called is a chance to win a prize and support the Little Sunshine Foundation.

    “This event is not just about the games; it’s a testament to the power of community and the impact we can make when we come together,” said Bianca.

    “The Foundation is getting a lot of requests from schools and organizations that need our help. We do our due diligence and support the students who need our help. The Sunshine Royale event gives us the funds to continue our literacy, sports, and ambassador programs and take on these additional requests for support,” she continued.

    Tickets are $100 per person and sponsorship opportunities are still available. Visit https://sunshineroyale.org to purchase tickets, make a tax-deductible donation, or learn more about sponsorship.

    Youth Ambassadors, celebrities, and board members at Little Sunshine Foundation’s “An Afternoon of Jazz” fundraiser, Sept. 22, 1019. Front row from left to right: Emily Lam, Evelyn Luang, Emma Hernandez, Gabrielle Braganza, Emily Millward, Jennifer Long, Emma Perez, Amanda Zurla. Back row from left to right: Saxophonist Mark Allen Felton, Kylee Vergo, Yaned Busch, Marie Emile, Annette Palazuelos, three-time Gold Medalist Leah O’Brien Amico, Monique Vobecky, Christine Keith, Dominque Pere, Bianca Vobecky, Jerry Jefferson, Narisa Hernandez.

    Youth Ambassadors, celebrities, and board members at Little Sunshine Foundation’s “An Afternoon of Jazz” fundraiser, Sept. 22, 1019. Front row from left to right: Emily Lam, Evelyn Luang, Emma Hernandez, Gabrielle Braganza, Emily Millward, Jennifer Long, Emma Perez, Amanda Zurla. Back row from left to right: Saxophonist Mark Allen Felton, Kylee Vergo, Yaned Busch, Marie Emile, Annette Palazuelos, three-time Gold Medalist Leah O’Brien Amico, Monique Vobecky, Christine Keith, Dominque Pere, Bianca Vobecky, Jerry Jefferson, Narisa Hernandez.

     

    About the Little Sunshine Foundation

    The Little Sunshine Foundation is a non-profit California corporation run entirely by volunteers. The organization’s mission is to provide underprivileged youth in the community the necessary resources to improve their quality of life through literacy and sports programs while also providing an avenue to train young adults on how to give back to their community. Monique Vobecky started the foundation in 2018 when she was just 14 years old because she believes “that every child deserves a little sunshine.”

    The Foundation has three main programs: Literacy, Sports, and Youth Empowerment

    To learn more about the Little Sunshine Foundation, visit https://www.littlesunshine.org.

    The Social Lites Annual Beautillion is Set for March 30

     “The Beautillion Knights program guides young men to ensure that our youth are college-bound and equipped to succeed in life and to realize their full potential as young men, career professionals, entrepreneurs, and productive outstanding citizens,” said Social Lites spokesperson Marlene Davis.

    SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF. —  The Social Lites, Inc. will award scholarships to deserving Black high school senior young men at its Beautillion Knights event on March 30 at Cal State San Bernardino. The Inland Empire nonprofit has provided scholarships for 54 years to young men attending college or technical school.

    The 2024 Beautillion Knights are Ali Dphrepaulezz of Etiwanda High School; Daniel Rivera of Cajon High School; Destyn Maurice of Flabob Airport Preparatory Academy in Moreno Valley; Frank Cox III of Summit High School; Solomon Moore of Citrus Valley High School, Syncere Brackett of Centennial High School in Eastvale, Darvion McGee, The PAL Charter Academy in San Bernardino.

    “College-bound 11th and 12th-grade students who are enrolled in the Beautillion Knights program participate in a five-month extracurricular program. During that time, they gain practical knowledge and experience that grounds them with lifelong foundations that benefit their academic and career success,” said Social Lites spokesperson Marlene Davis.

    Subjects include leadership development, life skills, and health education. Mentor-tutors work with young men to develop their talents and skills, exposing them to real-world experiences that give them insights into how to solve problems and prepare themselves for success as career professionals, entrepreneurs, and productive citizens.

    “The program guides young men to ensure that our youth are college-bound and equipped to succeed in life and to realize their full potential as young men, career professionals, entrepreneurs, and productive outstanding citizens,” said Davis.

    “The Social Lites organize weekly training sessions for their Knights and Court, which feature guest speakers who provide education on various important topics such as public speaking, dressing for success, resume writing, college applications, and business skills. The program also encourages Knights to participate in extracurricular academic activities, attend cultural events, engage in community service projects, and refine their social skills,” said Davis.

    “We have given out approximately $4.5 million in scholarships to more than 500 college-bound local young men. We have seen young men transformed into responsible adults through our program over the years. We encourage you to meet with us at our weekly meetings held every Sunday in downtown San Bernardino,” said Davis.

    “We encourage you to join us on March 30th for our 57th Annual Beautillion at Cal State University San Bernardino’s Student Union North. Social hour starts at 5:30 p.m., with scholarship award presentations to our Knights starting at 7:00.”

    Please contact Marlene Davis for more information at (909) 709-5502.

    Sleep Your Way to Good Health

    When youngsters get enough sleep, they are less impulsive, stressed, depressed, anxious, and aggressive, and can keep their cognitive functions working to their full capacity, like these award-winning young scholars.  Shaila and Shiane Dameron are happy healthy LaSalle patients.

    When youngsters get enough sleep, they are less impulsive, stressed, depressed, anxious, and aggressive, and can keep their cognitive functions working to their full capacity, like these award-winning young scholars. Shaila and Shiane Dameron are happy healthy LaSalle patients.

    Children and teens, especially, need adequate sleep for proper growth and development.” — Dr. Albert Arteaga

    REDLANDS, Calif. — Sleep is crucial for maintaining good health and well-being throughout your life, according to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. “The quality of your waking hours largely depends on what happens while you’re asleep.”

    “For proper growth and development, children and teens require 10 to 12 hours of sleep per night. Therefore, parents are encouraged to do their best to ensure that their children get enough rest,” said pediatrician Dr. Albert Arteaga, Chair of LaSalle Medical Associates, one of the Inland Empire’s largest private healthcare organizations.

    Signed into law by Governor Gavin Newsom in 2019, California now requires all high schools to start no earlier than 8:30 a.m. and an 8 a.m. or later start for middle schools this school year.

    Having schools start their day later in the morning is based on sleep studies that have shown developmental and educational problems arise due to inadequate sleep.  This an attempt to help teens get more sleep,” said Dr. Arteaga.

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) studies show that pre-teens who slept less than nine hours per day had differences in brain structure and more problems with mood and thinking than those who got adequate sleep. Improving sleep leads to better mental health and behavior from pre-adolescence on.

    NIH researchers “found that children in the insufficient sleep group at the start of the study had more mental health and behavioral challenges than those who got sufficient sleep. These included impulsivity, stress, depression, anxiety, aggressive behavior, and thinking problems.

    “The children with insufficient sleep also had impaired cognitive functions such as decision-making, conflict-solving, working memory, and learning. Differences between the groups persisted at the two-year follow-up.”

    After awakening, the body releases hormones that increase alertness. With developing pre-teens and teens, hormones act while sleeping in pulses that signal the body to release testosterone, estrogen, and progesterone. Those essential developmental hormonal pulses get bigger with the onset of puberty.

    Adults as well as youngsters are subject to many of the same problems in the absence of adequate sleep. These problems include hunger control, responsiveness to insulin, a decline in physical activity, and what is known as metabolic syndrome—a cluster of conditions that increase one’s risk “…of heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes,” according to the Mayo Clinic.

    The Mayo Clinic and Dr. Arteaga suggest six ways to improve one’s sleep. First, stick to a regular schedule, going to bed and waking up at the same time each day. “For adults, seven hours is the minimum and eight is recommended,” said Dr. Arteaga.

    Second, avoid eating large meals close to bedtime. Avoid midnight snacks and late-night alcohol. Nicotine is another no-no.

    Third, the bedroom should be comfortably cool, dark, and quiet. “It is difficult to fall asleep after being exposed to blue-light-emitting sources like computers, smartphones, and other devices,” said Dr. Arteaga.

    Fourth, “Napping during the daytime needs to be limited, as too many or too long naps will interfere with nighttime sleep,” said Dr. Arteaga.

    Fifth, don’t be a couch potato. “It is recommended to engage in some form of physical activity every day. However, it is not advisable to exercise right before bedtime as it can be counterproductive,” said Dr. Arteaga.

    And finally, learn to cope with stress and anxiety. “Rehashing daytime troubles is guaranteed to keep you from the restful sleep you need to cope with them the next day. You can use a notebook or planner to list things you need to pay attention to the next day and that lets your mind disengage from them at bedtime,” said Dr. Arteaga.

    He added, “If you or your children are having sleep problems anyway, it’s a good idea to call your doctor and ask for a referral to a sleep specialist. They can suggest additional practitioners or prescribe medications to help.”

    For more information go online to LaSalleMedical.com.

    About LaSalle Medical Associates

    LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc. is one of the largest independent and Latino-owned healthcare companies in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. The corporate office is in Redlands.

    LaSalle is also an Independent Practice Association (IPA) of independently contracted doctors, hospitals, and clinics, delivering high-quality patient care to over 350,000 patients in Fresno, Kings, Los Angeles, Madera, Riverside, San Bernardino and Tulare counties.

    Respondia “Dia” S. Poole will receive an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters at CSUSB

    Poole has spent her career in public service, serving in all three branches of California’s government and with the County of San Bernardino. She has combined that work with volunteer service on the CSUSB Alumni Association Board and on the CSU Alumni Council, where she has twice led as president and chaired the council’s government relations committee. She was named Cal State San Bernardino’s Alumni Advocate of the Year in 2008.

    Poole credits her CSUSB bachelor’s degree, earned as a nontraditional student, for opening opportunities for meaningful state-level public service. Her acceptance into the prestigious California Capital Fellows program in Sacramento launched her career in California state government. She was a highly regarded senior policy consultant to two of the State Assembly’s presiding leaders. She received a gubernatorial appointment to deputy director of public affairs for the Department of Fair Employment and Housing, the largest state civil rights agency in the nation.

    Poole’s state service culminated as a senior legislative advocate for the Judicial Council’s Office of Governmental Affairs. Her efforts were particularly significant for the Inland Empire, where the Superior Courts of San Bernardino and Riverside counties are the most under-resourced in the state.

    Poole’s volunteer service is equally impressive. She is known throughout the CSU system as a well-respected alumna whose unwavering volunteer leadership for more than 20 years has helped to strengthen the CSU degree, increase state and federal investments in students and academic programs, promote alumni engagement, and improve graduation rates.

    Her record of extraordinary volunteer leadership for the betterment of her alma mater and its students is extensive. Underrepresented students often lack accomplished professional role models, which makes her involvement as an Alumna Professor for a Day, a panelist for the President’s Scholars Leadership Symposium, and her workshops across disciplines to encourage students to apply for the competitive California Capital Fellows program, especially impactful.

    Dia also serves on the CSUSB Master of Public Administration advisory board, where she encourages public sector employees to enter the program. She also champions curricular developments that advance university, local government, and community-based partnerships.

    As a member of the CSUSB Philanthropic Foundation Board’s Advocacy Committee, Poole joins the campus delegation annually in Sacramento and often in Washington, D.C. Her philanthropic support to the university is demonstrated by her legacy, or estate, gift to the university.

    “My life was forever changed by CSUSB and the opportunities it opened up to me,” said Poole. “It is why I have continued to volunteer here on this campus and with the CSU at large. It is such a tremendous honor to receive this recognition. I know that a CSU degree can transform the lives of all Californians who enroll. And if you are a nontraditional student? Don’t let that stop you. CSUSB administrators, faculty, staff, and students value the professional and life experience you bring with you.”

    “Conferring an honorary doctorate upon Dia, a double graduate of our university, in recognition of her profound impact and dedicated service to the people of California and the betterment of her alma mater would be a great honor for CSUSB,” said university President Tomás D. Morales.

    Poole is a two-time CSUSB graduate, with a B.A. in business administration and information management (1990) and an M.A. in communications studies (2023).

    Black Culture Foundation Presents Eight Black Rose Awards and Two Scholarships

    Photo caption: Black Rose Award winners. Left to right first row; Fontana Mayor Acquanetta Warren, Sam’s Club Assistant Manager Michael Beauregard, California State University San Bernardino President Tomás Morales, San Bernardino City Unified School District Assistant Superintendent of Human Resources Dr. Marcus Funchess, American Career College Director of Education Tina Darling, City of Moreno Valley Park Commissioner James C. Baker II, Black Rose Awards Entertainment Chairperson Rev. Bronica Martindale, Black Culture Foundation Past President Ezekiel Adeleke, and Atkinson, Andelson, Loya, Ruud & Romo Partner Jack B. Clarke Jr. Back Row: Black Culture Foundation President Carl Dameron, GPL-Grandparents Love Founder Aristotle McDaniel, and Black Rose Awards Founder and Black Culture Foundation Secretary Jim King.

    Photo caption: Black Rose Award winners. Left to right first row; Fontana Mayor Acquanetta Warren, Sam’s Club Assistant Manager Michael Beauregard, California State University San Bernardino President Tomás Morales, San Bernardino City Unified School District Assistant Superintendent of Human Resources Dr. Marcus Funchess, American Career College Director of Education Tina Darling, City of Moreno Valley Park Commissioner James C. Baker II, Black Rose Awards Entertainment Chairperson Rev. Bronica Martindale, Black Culture Foundation Past President Ezekiel Adeleke, and Atkinson, Andelson, Loya, Ruud & Romo Partner Jack B. Clarke Jr. Back Row: Black Culture Foundation President Carl Dameron, GPL-Grandparents Love Founder Aristotle McDaniel, and Black Rose Awards Founder and Black Culture Foundation Secretary Jim King.

     “It’s time for young and old, novice and experienced to join us to honor our legacy of excellence and to build our leaders for the future,” said President Carl M Dameron, imploring people to become members at sbbcfoundation.org/membership.

    Riverside, CA—The Black Culture Foundation, Inc. honored eight local heroes and awarded two scholarships at its annual Black Rose Awards Gala.

    The recipients of the Dr. Juanita Scott Humanitarian of the Year Award was given to two individuals: Dr. Marcus Funchess, who serves as the assistant superintendent of human resources for the San Bernardino City Unified School District, and Jack B. Clarke Jr., a community leader and partner at the law firm of Atkinson, Andelson, Loya, Ruud & Romo.

    “On behalf of CSUSB’s 20,000 students and 125,000 alumni, we are honored to receive the Founders Award from the Black Culture Foundation,” stated California State University San Bernardino (CSUSB) President Dr. Tomás D. Morales. “We are proud of our partnership with the Black Culture Foundation and the African American community in the Inland Empire in advocating for educational opportunities to the residents of the Inland Empire.”

    Black Rose Award winners include City of Moreno Valley Park Commissioner James C. Baker II, Sam’s Club Assistant Manager Michael Beauregard, Atkinson, Andelson, Loya, Ruud & Romo Partner Jack B. Clarke Jr., American Career College Director of Education and New Hope Missionary Baptist Church Nursing and Health Ministry Chair Tina Darling, San Bernardino City Unified School District Assistant Superintendent of Human Resources Dr. Marcus Funchess, GPL-Grandparents Love Founder Aristotle McDaniel, California State University San Bernardino President Tomás Morales, and Fontana Mayor Acquanetta Warren.

    Maya Johnson and Daniel Rivera Jr. received Dr. Margaret Hill Black Rose Young Adults Inspiration Awards including scholarships of $1,250 each.

    The masters of ceremonies for the evening were Cal State University San Bernardino theatre arts professor Kathryn Ervin and former Judicial Council of California legislative advocate Dia S. Poole.

    The masters of ceremonies for the evening were Dia Poole and Kathryn Ervin. Fonadation Presdent carl M. Dameron is the man in the middel. Photo byVan Howard

    The masters of ceremonies for the evening were Dia Poole and Kathryn Ervin. Fonadation Presdent Carl M. Dameron is the man in the middel. Photo by Van Howard

    Entertainment for the evening came from Unspeakable Praise youth praise dance group and the Original Mary Jane Girls leader lead singer Makeda Francisco.  San Bernardino Valley College (SBVC) student JhuMaani Chess sang a stirring rendition of the United States National Anthem and SBVC student Cherish Jackson moved the audience with her rendition of The Black National Anthem.

    The Black Rose Awards are a complement to Black History Month. The awards are sponsored by the Black Culture Foundation, a nonprofit founded in 1968, to foster a greater understanding of Black culture and heighten community awareness of the accomplishments of Black people, past and present, and to plan, coordinate, and direct an annual Black History Month parade and related cultural activities.

    Foundation President Carl M. Dameron said, “The nomination committee chose outstanding Inland Empire leaders to receive Black Rose Awards this year.  We are honored to recognize and publicly thank them for their longtime and ongoing service to the people of the Inland Empire.”

    A list of all previous Black Rose Award winners from 1990 is on the Foundation website at sbbcfoundation.org

    Entertainment for the evening came from the Original Mary Jane Girls leader lead singer Makeda Francisco.

    Entertainment for the evening came from the Original Mary Jane Girls leader lead singer Makeda Francisco. Photo by Van Howard

    Event sponsors included The Southern California Gas Company, the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, Dameron Communications, Charles Bibbs, Southern California Edison, U.S. Representative Pete Aguilar (D-33), California State Assemblymember Eloise Reyes (D-50), The Social Lites, the law firm of Atkinson, Andelson, Loya, Ruud & Romo, and California State University, San Bernardino.

    Certificates of achievement were presented to the Black Rose Awards winners from Representative Pete Aguilar, Representative Ken Calvert, California State Senator Rosilicie Ochoa Bogh (R-23), State Senator Richard Roth (D-31), State Senator Kelly Seyarto (R-32), Assemblymember Sabrina Cervantes (D-58), Assemblymember Dr. Corey A. Jackson (D-60), Assemblymember James C. Ramos (D-45), Assemblymember Eloise Reyes, Assemblymember Greg Wallis (R-47), County of San Bernadino Second District Supervisor Jesse Armendarez, County of San Bernadino Fifth District Supervisor Joe Baca, Jr., and the Cities of Corona, Fontana, Highland, Rialto Riverside, and San Bernardino.

    The evening closed with the swearing of Carl M. Dameron as president of the Black Culture Foundation.  His theme for 2024 is “Its Time.”  Dameron proclaimed that “it’s time to bring back the San Bernardino Black History Parade. It’s time to bring back the Black Senior King and Queen. It’s time for an Inland Empire-wide Black events calendar, all online, in one place, free for all to share events and access.”

    Dameron concluded with “It’s time for young and old, novice and experienced to join us to honor our legacy of excellence and to build our leaders for the future.” He implored people to become members at sbbcfoundation.org/membership.

    Black Rose Award Winner Video Links. Click to see videos from the Black Rose Award winners  https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/19OjK4hFYE1_nHv7Z-9c6cNvvTfU92WLt?usp=sharing

    About the Black Rose Awards

    The Black Rose Awards are a complement to Black History Month. The awards are sponsored by the Black Culture Foundation, Inc. a nonprofit founded in 1968 by a small group of people who were concerned that, “…nationwide, our school systems have not yet incorporated Black history studies into regular school curriculums. Thus, all students miss the opportunity to learn more about a vital part of this country’s history.”

    The Black Culture Foundation’s purpose “…is to foster an interest and a greater understanding of Black culture, to heighten community awareness of the accomplishments of Black people, past and present, and to plan, coordinate and direct an annual Black History Month parade and related cultural activities…[and] bridge the gaps across cultural lines by bringing the local community together to celebrate this event in the spirit of unity and brotherhood.”

    The Black Rose Awards are the Foundation’s showcase cultural event.

    Go Nuts for Good Health

    Nuts and seeds in moderation are good for your health.

    Nuts and seeds in moderation are good for your health.

     

    “Adding both nuts and seeds to your diet provides a tasty way to give your body the nutrients it craves.” — Dr. Albert Arteaga

    REDLANDS, Calif., Feb. 14, 2024 — Going nuts can be good for your health, providing you with plenty of healthy protein, fiber, and nutrients that your body craves. Howard LeWine, MD, Chief Medical Editor for Harvard Health Publishing, points out that these tasty little treats contain plenty of healthy nutrients.

    LeWine notes that “peanuts and pecans contain lots of B vitamins; almonds are rich in calcium and vitamin E; walnuts have lots of folates, vitamin E, and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, an omega-3 fatty acid). And all nuts have magnesium.”

    Kathy McManus, director of the Department of Nutrition at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital, says, “In just a handful of nuts, which is about an ounce or a quarter of a cup, you get a lot of bang for the buck. They contain anywhere from 3 to 7 grams of protein per ounce, 1 to 3 grams of fiber, and 160 to 200 calories.”

    “Adding both nuts and seeds to your diet provides a tasty way to give your body the nutrients it craves,” said Albert Arteaga, MD, President of LaSalle Medical Associates, one of the Inland Empire’s largest privately owned healthcare organizations.

    LaSalle Medical Associates CEO Dr. Albert Arteaga

    LaSalle Medical Associates CEO Dr. Albert Arteaga, M.D.

    “Many nuts are the seeds of certain fruits, and it turns out that seeds like flaxseeds, chia seeds, sesame seeds, and pumpkin seeds are also very healthy.” Dr. Arteaga adds one cautionary note: “Don’t overdo it. A handful or two a day is fine, but more than that adds calories that aren’t good for your waistline.”

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) hosts extensive databases packed with nutritional information about nuts and seeds. Among the nutrients that they provide are magnesium to control blood pressure and bone health; potassium for heart and kidney health; zinc—essential for normal growth and development; iron to support the hemoglobin that carries oxygen to your lungs and other body cells; and vitamin C for the immune system, and to help protect against lead exposure.

    A healthy diet such as the Mediterranean Diet recommends avoiding saturated fats and taking in unsaturated fats. The USDA Food Composition Database tells us that walnuts supply 16 grams of unsaturated fat versus only 2 grams of saturated fat. For almonds, the ratio is 12.5 to 1, cashews 10 to 2, raw peanuts 11 to 2, chia seeds 7 to 0, and sunflower seeds 12 to 1.5.

    “Adding nuts and seeds to your daily diet is both delicious and healthful,” says Dr. Arteaga. “Just be sure that, like all good things, enjoy them in moderation.”

    For more information go online to LaSalleMedical.com.

    About LaSalle Medical Associates

    LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc. is one of the largest independent and Latino-owned healthcare companies in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. The corporate office is in Redlands.

     

    LaSalle is also an Independent Practice Association (IPA) of independently contracted doctors, hospitals, and clinics, delivering high-quality patient care to over 350,000 patients in Fresno, Kings, Los Angeles, Madera, Riverside, San Bernardino and Tulare counties.

    Keep the Lead OUT of Your Sweethearts Valentine’s Day Treats

    Helen Robinson and LaSalle patient Carl M. Dameron plan for Valentine’s festivities. Carl plans to buy a box of chocolates for his sweetheart, but wonders which one is healthy? Photo by Carl M. Dameron.

    Helen Robinson and LaSalle patient Carl M. Dameron plan for Valentine’s festivities. Carl plans to buy a box of chocolates for his sweetheart, but wonders which one is healthy. Photo by Carl M. Dameron.

    “Choose the right sweets for your sweetheart on Valentine’s Day.” — Dr. Albert Arteaga, Chair of LaSalle Medical Associates.

    REDLANDS, Calif., Feb. 10, 2024 — Not all sweets are created equal, and knowing the good, the bad, and the ugly can affect your sweetheart’s health, for better or worse. Few people are aware that the cocoa used to make chocolates and other sweets that include chocolate may include potentially toxic levels of lead and cadmium.

    Consumer Reports (CR) published two studies investigating the presence of heavy metals in chocolates. Of the brands they tested, a 2023 study found “a third of chocolate products are high in heavy metals.” CR tested 48 different products, including cocoa powder, chocolate chips, chocolate bars, mixes for hot chocolate, brownies, and cakes.

    Brands included Hershey’s, Ghirardelli, and Nestlé; retailer house brands from Costco, Target, Trader Joe’s, Walmart, and Whole Foods; and specialty brands Droste and Navitas.

    Dark chocolates have higher percentages of cocoa than milk chocolates, but “…every product we tested had detectable amounts of lead and cadmium,” according to James E. Rogers, Ph.D., CR’s director and acting head of product safety testing.

    Paradoxically, dark chocolate confections that have 70% or higher concentrations of cocoa are considered healthier than treats with lower concentrations because of their powerful antioxidant effect, which contributes to a lower risk of heart disease and enhanced brain function, according to Healthline. But higher cocoa content also means more heavy metals!

    Different chocolatiers manufacture their products using cocoa from different countries. The soil that provides nutrients to the cocoa plants is also the source of unhealthy concentrations of the heavy metals that end up in the cocoa beans.

    Milk chocolates do not contain worrying amounts of these metals. But milk chocolates don’t contain healthier levels of antioxidants. So, what is a Valentine’s Day gift giver to do? Consumer Reports studies are available to subscribers, but if you are not a subscriber, you will need to go online to third-party reports.

    Here are two online resources that are not behind a paywall: Food Revolution Network, a nonprofit health-oriented website (https://foodrevolution.org/blog/heavy-metals-in-chocolate/); and Forbes magazine (https://www.forbes.com/sites/brucelee/2022/12/16/23-of-28-dark-chocolate-bars-tested-have-high-lead-cadmium-levels/?sh=309bb8421640). You can also enter “heavy metals in chocolates” in your web browser for a complete list of resources.

    “Do your sweetheart a favor,” says Dr. Arteaga, “and if you give chocolates, choose brands without toxic levels of heavy metals. Choose the right sweets for your sweetheart on Valentine’s Day. Perhaps consider giving flowers or a fruit basket.”

    For more information go online to LaSalleMedical.com.

    —end—

    BRIEF: 278 words

    Keep the Lead OUT of Your Sweethearts Valentine’s Day Treats

    “Choose the right sweets for your sweetheart on Valentine’s Day.” — Dr. Albert Arteaga, Chair of LaSalle Medical Associates.

    REDLANDS, Calif., Feb. 10, 2024 — Not all sweets are created equal, and knowing the good, the bad, and the ugly can affect your sweetheart’s health, for better or worse. Consumer Reports (CR) studies tested 48 different products, for the presence of lead and cadmium in 2023.

    Brands included Hershey’s, Ghirardelli, and Nestlé; retailer house brands from Costco, Target, Trader Joe’s, Walmart, and Whole Foods; and specialty brands Droste and Navitas. Consumer Reports found that “…every product we tested had detectable amounts of lead and cadmium,” according to James E. Rogers, Ph.D., CR’s director and acting head of product safety testing.

    Paradoxically, dark chocolate confections that have 70% or higher concentrations of cocoa are considered healthier than treats with lower concentrations because of their powerful antioxidant effect, which contributes to a lower risk of heart disease and enhanced brain function, according to Healthline. But higher cocoa content also means more heavy metals!

    So, what is a Valentine’s Day gift giver to do? Consumer Reports studies are available to subscribers, but if you are not a subscriber, you will need to go online to third-party reports. Forbes magazine does a good job of reporting the findings:  (https://www.forbes.com/sites/brucelee/2022/12/16/23-of-28-dark-chocolate-bars-tested-have-high-lead-cadmium-levels/?sh=309bb8421640).

    You can also enter “heavy metals in chocolates” in your web browser for a complete list of resources.

    “Do your sweetheart a favor,” says Dr. Arteaga, “and if you give chocolates, choose brands without toxic levels of heavy metals. Choose the right sweets for your sweetheart on Valentine’s Day. Perhaps consider giving flowers or a fruit basket.”

    For more information go online to LaSalleMedical.com.

    —end—

    Black Culture Foundation Announces Winners for Its 2024 Dr. Juanita Scott Humanitarian of the Year Award

    Dr. Marcus Funchess, Assistant Superintendent of Human Resources of the San Bernardino City Unified School District is The Dr. Juanita Scott Humanitarian of the Year Co-Award winner.

    Dr. Marcus Funchess, Assistant Superintendent of Human Resources of the San Bernardino City Unified School District is The Dr. Juanita Scott Humanitarian of the Year Co-Award winner.

     

    Jack B. Clark, Jr., partner at the law firm of Atkinson, Andelson, Loya, Ruud & Romo. he is The Dr. Juanita Scott Humanitarian of the Year Co-Award winner.

    Jack B. Clark, Jr., a partner at the law firm of Atkinson, Andelson, Loya, Ruud & Romo, is The Dr. Juanita Scott Humanitarian of the Year Co-Award winner.

    The awards will be presented at the Black Rose Awards Gala on Friday, February 23 at 5:30 p.m. at the Riverside Convention Center.

    SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF. Feb. 7, 2024 — The San Bernardino Black Culture Foundation announces that Jack B. Clarke, Jr., partner at the law firm of Atkinson, Andelson, Loya, Ruud & Romo, and Dr. Marcus Funchess, Assistant Superintendent of Human Resources of the San Bernardino City Unified School District, have won the 2024 Dr. Juanita Scott Humanitarian of the Year Award.

    Foundation President-elect Carl Dameron said, “We have chosen two outstanding Inland Empire people for the Humanitarian Award this year so that they can be recognized and publicly thanked for their long-time and ongoing service to the people of the Inland Empire.”

    Clarke handles litigation concerning education law, special education disputes, public agency litigation, and other substantial matters. He has successfully defended school districts and other education clients in student disciplinary matters, civil rights and Constitutional claims, and special education due process hearings.

    Clarke was the first African American to chair the board of the Greater Riverside Chambers of Commerce, and he served as chair of the Mayor’s Use-of-Force Review Panel in 1999 following the high-profile police shooting death of Tyisha Miller in Riverside, California.

    His community service contributions have been recognized by the Riverside County Bar Association, California Law Business magazine, the NAACP, the American Diabetes Association, and now the Black Culture Foundation.

    Funchess has served the Inland Empire (IE) as an elementary school teacher from 1998 to 2007, a vice principal from 2007 to 2010 and then principal from 2010 to July 2016 at the Thompson and Henry Elementary Schools, and assistant superintendent of human resources at the San Bernardino City Unified School District (SBCUSD) since August 2020. Funchess also served as Human Resources Director from 2016 to 2020.

    He received his Doctorate in Leadership for Educational Justice from the University of Redlands in 2014. Funchess collaboratively developed the Aspiring Administrator program to grow and develop SBCUSD leaders from within the District. He also helped develop the Golden Bell Award-winning Grow Our Own initiative to educate and hire the next generation of educators from within the community.

    The initiative encourages current SBCUSD students interested in careers in education to pursue their dreams with support from the District, even after leaving high school, and return to SBCUSD to share their knowledge and experience.

    The Black Rose Awards are Friday, February 23, at 5:30 p.m. Tickets are going FAST, get your tickets TODAY: https://sbbcfoundation.org/events/2024-black-rose-awards/

    The Black Rose Awards are on Friday, February 23, at 5:30 p.m. Tickets are available at: sbbcfoundation.org

    “Additional Black Rose Award winners include Acquanetta Warren, Mayor of Fontana; James C. Baker II, Park Commissioner for the City of Moreno Valley; Michael Beauregard, Assistant Manager at Sam’s Club; Tina Darling, Director of Education at American Career College, Ontario, and chair of the Nursing and Health Ministry at New Hope Missionary Baptist Church; and Aristotle McDaniel, founder of GPL-Grandparents Love,” said Foundation President, Ezekiel Adeleke.

    The 31st Annual San Bernardino Culture Foundation Black Rose Awards ceremony takes place on Friday, Feb. 23, starting at 5:30 p.m. at the Riverside Convention Center.

    For tickets to the gala, visit the Black Culture Foundation’s website at:  https://sbbcfoundation.org/events/2024-black-rose-awards/.

    To become a Black Rose Awards sponsor, go to https://blackculturefoundation.square.site/.

    To become a volunteer or board member, send an email to blackrose@sbbcfoundation.org.

    About the Black Rose Awards

    The Black Rose Awards are a complement to Black History Month. The awards are sponsored by the Black Culture Foundation, a nonprofit founded in 1968 by a small group of people who were concerned that, “…nationwide, our school systems have not yet incorporated Black history studies into regular school curriculums. Thus, all students miss the opportunity to learn more about a vital part of this country’s history.”

    The Black Culture Foundation’s purpose “…is to foster an interest and a greater understanding of Black culture, to heighten community awareness of the accomplishments of Black people, past and present, and to plan, coordinate and direct an annual Black History Month parade and related cultural activities…[and] bridge the gaps across cultural lines by bringing the local community together to celebrate this event in the spirit of unity and brotherhood.” The Black Rose Awards are the Foundation’s major cultural event.