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    Non-Profit Organization Takes Action to Combat Homeless Crisis in San Bernardino and Support Local Veterans

    Reaching New Heights Foundation Hosts Stand Down Outreach Event for Veterans and Homeless in San Bernardino 

    Non-Profit Organization Takes Action to Combat Homeless Crisis in San Bernardino and Support Local Veterans 

    SAN BERNARDINO, Calif. (August 24, 2022)—Reaching New Heights Foundation (RNHF), a nonprofit veteran organization, is hosting a Veterans Stand Down and Homeless Resource Event on Wednesday, October 12, 2021, at Perris Hill Park in San Bernardino. The one-day event is designed to support Inland Empire veterans and to provide much-needed resources to the area’s homeless population. 

    On average, there are 960 veterans a year who are homeless in San Bernardino. The 2020 San 

    Bernardino Homeless Count Survey shows the homeless count in 2020 increased 19.9% over 2019. RNHF is hoping the Veteran Stand Down event will be a way to take action against the extensive homeless issue that has been referred to as a “human services crisis.” 

    “We believe in making a difference so we’re bringing over sixty different service providers to one place. We are asking that the providers not just hand out information, but provide on-site services,” said RNHF Founder and CEO Sgt. Major (Ret.) Gregory Coker. “Normally it would take a veteran or a homeless individual several months to receive this kind of service we’re providing in one day.” 

    In the military, a stand down is an opportunity to pause and regroup to help those in need. With this Veterans Stand Down event, two underserved and at-risk populations—veterans and the homeless—will be able to regroup with access to an abundance of resources. 

    “Veterans will receive surplus clothing, access to medical and dental service, counseling and more. The homeless will receive free food, clothing, haircuts, medical checkups, and showers, said Coker. “We want to give our homeless and veterans a hand up, not a handout.” 

    RNHF is collaborating with local city, county, state, and federal organizations to host the event. 

    Key supporters include San Bernardino County Veterans Affairs, VA Loma Linda Veteran Health Care System, The Salvation Army, United Way, Goodwill, IEHP, Molina Healthcare, San Manuel Casino and Volunteers for Veterans Foundation. 

    After the event, RNHF is committed to following up on the success of all individuals who register to receive help and will provide 6 -12 months of additional support. 

    EVENT DETAILS: 

    October 12, 2022 

    Perris Hill Park 

    1135 E. Highland Ave. San Bernardino, CA 92408 10:00 a.m.-3:30 p.m. 

    Event Website: standdownvet.com 

     

    About Reaching New Heights Foundation 

    Founded in 2013, Reaching New Heights Foundation, Inc. is an award-winning non-profit organization created by a veteran for veterans. It proudly helps Inland Empire veterans successfully transition from active-duty military service, incarceration, or homelessness to life as civilians and productive members of society. Reaching New Heights assists nearly 300 veterans a month with a variety of services including housing, jobs, educational resources, mentorships and more. For more information visit www.rnhf.org 

     

    Press Contact: Sgt. Major Greg Coker

    320 N. E. St.,
    San Bernardino, CA 92401

    (909) 518-4951 info@rnhf.org

    How The Salvation Army Started Ringing Silver Bells and Red Kettles

    Captain Joseph McFee

    Captain Joseph McFee, serving with the San Francisco Salvation Army Corps in 1891. started the Red Kettle.

    Captain Joseph McFee, serving with the San Francisco Salvation Army Corps in 1891, wanted to serve Christmas dinner to the poor in his neighborhood. But he didn’t have money to do so.

    REDLANDS, CALIF.— “I have been asked many times, how and why did The Salvation Army start ringing those silver bells during the Christmas season to encourage donations,” said Major Isaias Braga, Commander of The Salvation Army of San Bernardino. “Well, this is how it all began…

    Captain Joseph McFee, serving with the San Francisco Salvation Army Corps in 1891, wanted to serve Christmas dinner to the poor in his neighborhood. But he didn’t have money to do so.

    As a sailor in Liverpool, England, Captain McFee saw people on the docks throw money into a large kettle called “Simpson’s Pot” to help the poor. He decided this might work in California too.

    Captain McFee set up a kettle at the Oakland Ferry Landing, which operated a ferry that was, in those days, the only way across San Francisco Bay. He put a sign on the kettle saying, “Keep the Pot Boiling” and raised enough money to serve the Christmas dinner.

    His idea spread quickly, and by 1897 Salvation Army Corps nationwide were collecting money in kettles to serve the needy in their communities. Among the Salvation Army Corps collecting money this way before the turn of the 20th Century was The Salvation Army of San Bernardino, which was formed in 1887.

    Tom Brickley rings the bells

    Tom Brickely invites people to donate to The Salvation Army outside of Walmart in Highland. Tom is long time The Salvation Army advisory board member and former president of Brickely Environmental. Please donate to help the children have a great Christmas.

    Lynn Valbuena, Chair of the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, is the keynote speaker at this year’s Red Kettle Kick-Off event for The Salvation Army’s Annual Red Kettle 2022 Christmas campaign on Thursday, November 17th at 5:30 PM.

     For nearly 50 years, Chairwoman Valbuena has held numerous elected and appointed positions within San Manuel tribal government.

    For nearly 50 years, Chairwoman Valbuena has held numerous elected and appointed positions within San Manuel tribal government.

    Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY. For local information call (909) 792-6868.  Donors may drop off turkeys, hams other food, cash or gift cards at the Salvation Army’s Corps Office at 838 Alta Street, Redlands California 92373

    About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps

    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church and offers holistic programs for individuals of all. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world.

    The Salvation Army has served San Bernardino since 1887, and Redlands since 1885, supporting those in need without discrimination.  They serve the cities of: San Bernardino, Redlands, Highlands, Rialto, Loma Linda, Colton, Yucaipa, Calimesa, Bloomington, Mentone, Grand Terrace, Muscoy, and the mountain communities.

    Salvation Army Appoints New San Bernardino Corps Leaders

    PHOTO CAPTION: Majors Isaias (left) and Adelma Braga.

    PHOTO CAPTION: Majors Isaias (left) and Adelma Braga.

    “We are delighted to have been given this posting and we are already working on making this Corps an even more effective provider of services here.”

    REDLANDS, CALIF.—The Salvation Army has appointed new leaders, Majors Isaias and Adelma Braga, to manage the San Bernardino/Redlands Corps and tasked them with both consolidating and expanding services to the greater San Bernardino community.

    “We are delighted to have been given this posting,” says Major Isaias Braga, “and we are working on making this Corps an even more effective provider of services.” They have already combined the formerly separate San Bernardino and Redlands administrations into a single unit, located at 838 Alta St., Redlands.

    This dynamic husband and wife team are originally from Brazil and have been instrumental in making good things happen everywhere that the Salvation Army has sent them. They met in 1976 at a Bible study. “Isaias was my first date,” says Adelma, “and we got married in 1980.”

    The couple has three grown children: Isaias, Jr., who is 40 and an economist in Colorado; Felipe, 39, who is a Property Project Coordinator for the Salvation Army’s Northwest Seattle Corps; and daughter Aline, 36, also a Salvation Army officer, whose husband served in the U.S. Army as staff sergeant for 13 years (including two tours in Iraq and two in Afghanistan and Korea), now on leave from the Salvation Army in order to care for her ill mother-in-law. Isaias and Aline each have two children and Felipe, one.

    The Bragas moved to the USA in 1992, joined The Salvation Army in 1993 and spent 16 years with the organization, where from initial home meetings, they founded the first-ever Portuguese-speaking ministry, starting at the Torrance Corps, CA and now in operation at Redondo Beach Corps, CA.

    The Salvation Army next invited them to take over a senior residential facility in Redondo Beach in 2005. That operation hosted 50 seniors and served 3,500 meals each week to residents and community members with a Meals on Wheels Program.

    In 2012 the Bragas relocated to Colorado, first in Broomfield and then in Fort Collins for a total of seven years, followed by a two-year assignment to Renton, Washington. They then were appointed to their homeland, Brazil, where the Salvation Army gave Isaias the job of National Officer for Government Relations in Brasília, the Capital of Brazil.

    PHOTO CAPTION: Majors Isaias (left) and Adelma Braga flank Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro.

    PHOTO CAPTION: Majors Isaias (left) and Adelma Braga flank Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro.

    Having served in the Brazilian Army from 1977 to 1987, mustering out as a First Infantry Lieutenant, Isaias knew the Brazilian system and during his Salvation Army posting, established close relationships with the country’s President and other prominent Brazilian leaders.

    Unfortunately, Adelma was diagnosed with breast cancer, so the couple had to return from overseas for her treatment on a short medical leave. Happily, Adelma is now in remission and working alongside Isaias as they confront the challenge of finding a way to combine the Corps’ operations in four different locations into one, while also expanding the capacities of all their social services programs in order to serve an ever-increasing demand for Salvation Army services.

    Major Braga’s team has identified a five-acre site in San Bernardino that could meet the Corps’ needs and is now in negotiations to secure the land, as well as the necessary funding for a building to house the church and all its service units.

    “We will be able to use the proceeds from selling our existing lands and buildings,” says Major Braga, “but we will need additional resources in order to be able to build a facility large enough to accommodate all our needs.”

    The Salvation Army opened in San Bernardino in 1887 and has been helping people in need since then. Its programs have proven effective in dealing with drug and alcohol abuse, homelessness, hunger and coping with life’s many challenges. To find out more about the Salvation Army’s many community services and how you can get assistance or contribute to its mission, visit their website at https://sanbernardino.salvationarmy.org/

     

    About the Salvation Army

    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. To donate go to: www.salvationarmyusa.org

    American Girl Doll “Tea Party” Gets New Troop for the Girl Scouts

    DSC06662 Photo Caption: A parents signs her daughter up for Girl Scouting in San Bernadino. The American Girl Doll Tea Party is made possible thanks to the generous support of the people and organizations of San Bernardino including the San Bernardino City Library Foundation.

    DSC06662 Photo Caption: A parents signs her daughter up for Girl Scouting in San Bernadino. The American Girl Doll Tea Party is made possible thanks to the generous support of the people and organizations of San Bernardino including the San Bernardino City Library Foundation.

    (SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF.) Families—complete with fathers, mothers, grandparents, and lots of daughters—attended the first American Girl Doll Tea Party in three years at Dr. Mildred Dalton Henry Elementary School in San Bernadino. The Girl Scouts were there, and they signed up enough girls to start a new troop.

    “Another great success of the American Girl Tea Party included Girls Scouts of San Gorgonio obtaining enough interest to start a new Girl Scout Troop in the Mt. Vernon area,” says Knea Hawley, Vice President of Development for Girls Scouts of San Gorgonio.

    DSC06659 Photo Caption: Girl Scout leaders were attended the American Girl Doll Tea Party scouting for new members. Left to right: Linda Scroggins, Knea Hawley, Concetta Miller and Debra Donnell. The American Girl Doll Tea Party is made possible thanks to the generous support of the people and organizations of San Bernardino including the San Bernardino City Library Foundation.

    DSC06659 Photo Caption: Girl Scout leaders were attended the American Girl Doll Tea Party scouting for new members. Left to right: Linda Scroggins, Knea Hawley, Concetta Miller and Debra Donnell. The American Girl Doll Tea Party is made possible thanks to the generous support of the people and organizations of San Bernardino including the San Bernardino City Library Foundation.

    “Girl Scouts is a great way to help girls learn new skills and make friends, but the pandemic has made it difficult for some troops to meet,” says Hawley.  “I am thrilled to see the outpouring of support for girls and scouting.  We’re grateful to have Girl Scout alumna Ivana Wright, who led a troop before the pandemic, and will lead this new one.

    “I am really excited to work with a new group of girls and help them gain life skills, develop their interest in community and champion girls who will make the world a better place,” said Ivana Wright, Girl Scout of the Year 2017.

    Foundation President Arlington Rodgers, Jr. says, “The mission of the San Bernardino City Library Foundation is to make sure that our public libraries continue to be places where everyone in the community can gather, learn, grow, and interact. The joining of local girls with The Girl Scouts at a Foundation-sponsored event, is a fine example of how the Library Foundation helps our community do just that.”

    Photo Caption: Girls and Boys of all ethnicities attended the recent American Girl Tea Party. The Girl Scouts enough interest to start a new Troop in the Mt. Vernon area," says Knea Hawley, Vice President of Development for Girls Scouts of San Gorgonio The American Girl Doll Tea Party is made possible thanks to the generous support of the people and organizations of San Bernardino including the San Bernardino City Library Foundation.

    Photo Caption: Girls and Boys of all ethnicities attended the recent American Girl Tea Party. The Girl Scouts enough interest to start a new Troop in the Mt. Vernon area,” says Knea Hawley, Vice President of Development for Girls Scouts of San Gorgonio The American Girl Doll Tea Party is made possible thanks to the generous support of the people and organizations of San Bernardino including the San Bernardino City Library Foundation.

    The doll collection and the multi-generational American Girl Doll Tea Party are both made possible thanks to the generous support of the people and organizations of San Bernardino including the San Bernardino City Library Foundation.

    “The San Bernardino City Library allows children to check out an American Girl Doll kit.  It includes ethnically diverse dolls, a carrying case, accessories, a book about the doll and a journal. Children checking out the dolls are encouraged to write about their playing with the dolls in a journal,” said Angela Encinas, Children’s Librarian.

    For more information on how to join the new San Bernardino Troop or to start a new Girl Scout troop contact Concetta Miller cmiller@gssgc.org.

    For more information on the San Bernardino City Library Foundation go to SBCLF.com

    About the San Bernardino City Library Foundation

    The mission of the San Bernardino City Library Foundation is to make sure that our public libraries continue to be places where everyone in the community can gather, learn, grow, and interact.

    Since 1995, the San Bernardino City Library Foundation has provided the San Bernardino Public Library system with the financial support it needs to provide new books for patrons, offer free tutoring for all academic levels, provide patrons with access to e-books and audiobooks, and provide innovative programs like a Makerspace and the American Girl Doll program. To join the Foundation or donate go to SBCLF.com.

     Board members include Arlington C. Rodgers, Jr., President; Cheryl R. Brown, Vice President, Community Relations; Mary Kay DeCrescenzo, Vice President, Operations; Debra A. Fields, Secretary, Dr. Chris Tickell, Evy Morales and Timothy Prince, Directors.

    About The Girl Scouts of San Gorgonio

    Girl Scouts of San Gorgonio serves more than 10,000 girls in Riverside and San Bernardino counties with the dedicated support of 3,000 adult volunteers.  GSSGC believes that in order to be a leader within your community, you have to truly become a part of that community. Girl Scouts offers girls the unique opportunity to identify and support issues that are important to them, form partnerships with other people, businesses, and organizations and create sustainable projects that change the world around them. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit gssgc.org.

    Photo Caption: Girls and Boys of all ethnicities attended the recent American Girl Tea Party.  The Girl Scouts enough interest to start a new Troop in the Mt. Vernon area,” says Knea Hawley, Vice President of Development for Girls Scouts of San Gorgonio The American Girl Doll Tea Party is made possible thanks to the generous support of the people and organizations of San Bernardino including the San Bernardino City Library Foundation.

    DSC06659 Photo Caption: Girl Scout leaders were attended the American Girl Doll Tea Party  scouting for new members. Left to right: Linda Scroggins, Knea Hawley, Concetta Miller and Debra Donnell. The American Girl Doll Tea Party is made possible thanks to the generous support of the people and organizations of San Bernardino including the San Bernardino City Library Foundation.

    DSC06662 Photo Caption: A parents signs her daughter up for Girl Scouting in San Bernadino

    SBCLF-PR-104.2 Final Tea Party Gets Girl Scouts

    For More Information call

    Carl M. Dameron @ (909) 534-9500

    or email Carl@DameronCommunications.com

     

    For Immediate Release—391 words

    Paying It Forward, Pays Off!

    "I've quit drinking and for the first time in years, I was able to buy school clothes for my children and a sturdy pair of shoes for myself for work. Mike Delgado at The Salvation Army is helping me now to qualify for section 8 housing. I'm excited about work and feel so much better now that a big weight has been taken off of me. All I can say is that you should never give up."

    “I’ve quit drinking and for the first time in years, I was able to buy school clothes for my children and a sturdy pair of shoes for myself for work. Mike Delgado at The Salvation Army is helping me now to qualify for section 8 housing. I’m excited about work and feel so much better now that a big weight has been taken off of me. All I can say is that you should never give up.” (From left) Angel, Hope, Zoe, Andrew, Nicholas and Noah (twins), and Amanda Arista.

     

    “We’re gonna be okay, thanks to the Salvation Army!” says Amanda Arista

    SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF.—A few years ago, a young mother saw her children’s dad getting into trouble with drugs and going downhill. She got him involved with the Salvation Army’s Hospitality House program and today he’s clean and sober, has a good job and his life is in good order.

    Unfortunately, things later took a turn for the worse for that single mother of six, Amanda Arista. In 2019 she lost her job and was evicted from the residence she had been renting, along with her children ages 10 to 16. She didn’t know what to do and it broke her heart to place three of her children with their father and three with her mother. Then Covid hit.

    Her mom got ill and Amanda started caring for her. For a while, her mother got better but then took a turn for the worse and passed away in August 2021. Amanda went on a mental and emotional roller coaster, sometimes up, sometimes down. Her mom had always been the one to help her with paperwork for things like applying for government help. She found herself unable to fill out Social Security assistance forms.

    Amanda Arista said "I prayed for help from God and who should come to my rescue but my children's father, Miguel, who got in touch and told me he hadn't realized how bad things were."

    Amanda Arista said “I prayed for help from God and who should come to my rescue but my children’s father, Miguel, who got in touch and told me he hadn’t realized how bad things were.”

    Amanda started drinking heavily and got into such a dark mood that she was sometimes afraid to leave her room. She was losing the will to live. She prayed for help from God and who should come to her rescue but her children’s father, Miguel, who got in touch and told her he hadn’t realized how bad things were.

    And that’s when everything started to change for the better. The man she had helped to recover from his own downward spiral now turned out to be the one to help her. On a Saturday, Miguel told her about the Salvation Army’s Hospitality House program and that as it helped him, it could now help her.

    The following Monday, Naomi Goforth, the Hospitality House Program Director, and Mike Delgado, the Social Services Director for the Salvation Army’s San Bernardino Corps, contacted her and processed her into the same program that had been so helpful for Miguel.

    Delgado says, “Usually, our referrals come from churches, county agencies or veterans’ programs. Amanda’s case was different, as her children’s father, who she had referred to us a few years ago, was the one who got her into our program. It’s a great example of ‘paying it forward’ paying off for her and her children.”

    “I was really in a dark place,” says Amanda, “depressed and anxious, talking to myself. Miguel saw that I needed help, and he got me connected with the Salvation Army. Today, I’m mentally stable, I have a place to live, I have my kids back with me and in school, and I have a job working for Super 8. The Salvation Army is paying the rent on two motel rooms for us, as the Hospitality House residence is at capacity right now.

    Mike Delgado says, "Usually, our referrals come from churches, county agencies or veterans' programs. Amanda's case was different, as her children's father, who she had referred to us a few years ago, was the one who got her into our program. It's a great example of 'paying it forward' paying off for her and her children."

    Mike Delgado says, “Usually, our referrals come from churches, county agencies or veterans’ programs. Amanda’s case was different, as her children’s father, who she had referred to us a few years ago, was the one who got her into our program. It’s a great example of ‘paying it forward’ paying off for her and her children.”

    “I’ve quit drinking and for the first time in years, I was able to buy school clothes for my children and a sturdy pair of shoes for myself for work. Mike Delgado is helping me now to qualify for section 8 housing. I’m excited about work and feel so much better now that a big weight has been taken off of me. All I can say is that you should never give up.”

    The Salvation Army is able to help people like Miguel, Amanda and their children thanks to the generosity of the people and organizations who contribute money and other resources like food and clothing. To find out more about the Salvation Army’s Hospitality House Program and other Salvation Army services, visit their website at https://sanbernardino.salvationarmy.org/

    About the Salvation Army

    The Salvation Army is able to help people like Miguel, Amanda and their children thanks to the generosity of the people and organizations who contribute money and other resources like food and clothing. To find out more about the Salvation Army’s Hospitality House Program and other Salvation Army services, go to https://sanbernardino.salvationarmy.org/ or call (909) 888-4880.

    Hungry? The Salvation Army’s Summer Meals Program is here to Help


    “Demand has really picked up the past couple of months. We are serving more meals and distributing more food than ever,” says Mike Delgado, Social Service Director for the Salvation Army’s San Bernardino Corps.

    SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF.— The San Bernardino area Salvation Army Summer Meals Program is in full swing and ready to help area residents enjoy good-tasting and healthy hot meals.

    “The Summer Meals Program at our San Bernardino Hospitality House served 5–7,000 meals per month last year, and we expect that because of inflation and a slowing economy, we will be serving more this year,” says San Bernardino Corps Major Isaias Braga.

    Because of the current Covid situation, sit-down meals are served only to Hospitality House residents, located at 925 West Tenth Street, San Bernardino. Nonetheless, to-go hot meals in boxes are being distributed to community members in need at that location. Community meals are served from 4:30 to 5:30 pm six days per week, Sunday through Friday, and closed Saturday.

    In addition to the to-go hot meals offered at the Hospitality House, the Salvation Army also distributes non-perishable food items and fresh meat through a community food distribution program on the first, second and third Thursdays of each month from 9:00 to 11:30 am.

    On the first Thursday, this takes place at the Redlands Corps facility, 838 Alta St., Redlands, 92374; on the second and third Thursdays, at the San Bernardino Corps warehouse facility at the San Bernardino Airport, 295 North Leland Norton Way, San Bernardino, 92408.

    “Demand has really picked up the past couple of months. We are serving more meals and distributing more food than ever,” says Mike Delgado, Social Service Director for the Salvation Army’s San Bernardino Corps. “In San Bernardino, we went from 120 to 168 food boxes and in Redlands from 120 to 144.”

    As one recent meal recipient put it, “We’re eating good meals, thanks to the Salvation Army!”

    Because the Salvation Army’s operations are so efficient, a gift of just $1.28 is enough to provide a nutritious meal for a hungry child, homeless adult, or struggling senior.

    The San Bernardino Corps of The Salvation Army serves Big Bear, Blue Jay, Crestline, Lake Arrowhead, the mountain communities, Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto, Loma Linda, Yucaipa, Redlands, and San Bernardino.

    To find out more about the Salvation Army’s Summer Meals Program and other Salvation Army programs, visit their website at https://sanbernardino.salvationarmy.org/

    About the Salvation Army

    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. To donate go to: www.salvationarmyusa.org

    American Girl Doll “Tea Party” Fun for All

    Photo caption: After a two-year Covid hiatus, families indulged in canapés, tea, cake, free plants, a book signing and new dolls with the American Girl Doll collection thanks to the San Bernardino City Library Foundation. The young ladies are ready to cut into the special cake for the American Girl Doll Tea Party.

    Photo caption: After a two-year Covid hiatus, families indulged in canapés, tea, cake, free plants, a book signing and new dolls with the American Girl Doll collection thanks to the San Bernardino City Library Foundation. The young ladies are ready to cut into the special cake for the American Girl Doll Tea Party.

    (San Bernardino, Calif.)   More than 110, daughters, sons, granddaughters, parents, and grandparents from throughout the Inland Empire enjoyed canapés, tea, and cake at the first American Girl Doll “Tea Party” in two years, thanks to the San Bernardino City Library Foundation.

    The multi-generational American Girl Doll Tea Party took place recently at Dr. Mildred Dalton Henry Elementary School, complete with a book signing from the school’s namesake and author Dr. Mildred Dalton Henry herself.

    In opening his school to host the Tea Party, Dr. Christopher Tickell, Principal said he plans to make this a signature event of his school for the foreseeable future. “ I was so excited to be a part of such an amazing event. To see so many people working so hard together to make something special for our community. I look forward to hosting this tea again and again and again.”

    San Bernadino City Library Director Ed Erjavek, and Library Foundation President Arlington Rodgers, Jr., welcomed the families to the celebration. San Bernardino City Council member Kimberley Calvin, and School Board member Dr. Gwen Dowdy Rodgers  joined the festivities.

    Families—complete with fathers, mothers, and grandparents—came from San Bernardino, Riverside, Rialto, Hesperia, Redlands, and Rancho Cucamonga to attend the American Girl Tea Party in San Bernadino. Four children won American Girl Dolls and books in the event’s free raffle.

    Cheryl Brown former Assemblymember (retired) and San Bernardino City Library Foundation Board member and committee chairperson and President Arlington Rodgers, Jr., served as emcees and led the afternoon with information, food, and fun.

    Canapés and tea were served by youth and adult volunteers including Black Voice newspaper publisher Dr. Paulette Brown-Hinds, Jordan and Peyton Brown, Isabell and Olivia Lee ,San Bernardino City Library Foundation board members Mary Kay DeCrescenzo, Vice President, Operations, Debra A. Fields, Secretary, and Arlington Rodgers, Jr., President. The annual event attracts children and their parents from the Greater San Bernardino Area.

    Lynn Summers presented the University of California’s local Master Gardener/Master Food  Preserver program members who taught the children the oldest secrets on food preservation, making seed paper, pickled vegetables and gave all participants free milkweed plants.

    Milkweed plants are the favorite food of Monarch butterflies. The children were asked to plant them to draw butterflies to their yards and help renew the butterfly population.

    Angela Encinas , Children’s Librarian  described how The San Bernardino City Library allows children to check out an American Girl Doll kit.  It includes ethnically diverse dolls, a carrying case, accessories, a book about the doll and a journal. Children checking out the dolls are encouraged to write about their playing with the dolls in a journal. She included a reading of one of the journal pages and the author was in the audience, imagine the surprise on her face after hearing her words two years after she wrote them.

    “Another great success of the day included The Girls Scouts obtaining enough sign-ups to start a new Girl Scout Troop in the Mt. Vernon area, the first new one in many years,” said Knea Hawley, Girl Scout executive.

    The doll collection and the annual tea are both made possible thanks to the generous support of the people and organizations of San Bernardino that take delight in giving children entertaining educational experiences.

    Foundation President Arlington Rodgers says, “Our deepest gratitude to our generous Foundation Partners who made the afternoon tea possible: Dr. Christopher Tickell, the Irvine Foundation, Dr. Paulette Brown-Hinds, the University of California Cooperative, Extension Master Food Preservers and Master Gardeners of San Bernardino, the Westside Action Group, Mary Kay DeCrescenzo, Debra Fields, Edison International, Amazon, the Inland Empire Community Foundation, the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, the Friends of the Library, Johnnie Ralph, Shelby Obershaw, Dameron Communications and Evy Morales.

    Planning for next year’s American Girl Tea Party begins next week.  If you are interested in joining the planning, please call Stacy at (909) 381-8211.

    About the San Bernardino City Library Foundation

    The mission of the San Bernardino City Library Foundation is to make sure that our public libraries continue to be places where everyone in the community can gather, learn, grow, and interact.

    Since 1995, the San Bernardino City Library Foundation has provided the San Bernardino Public Library system with the financial support it needs to provide new books for patrons, offer free tutoring for all academic levels, provide patrons with access to e-books and audiobooks, and provide innovative programs like a Makerspace and the American Girl Doll program. 

    Board members include Arlington Rodgers, Jr., President; Cheryl R. Brown, Vice President, Community Relations; Mary Kay DeCrescenzo, Vice President, Operations; Debra A. Fields, Secretary, Dr. Chris Tickell, Treasurer Evy Morales and Timothy Prince, Directors.

    Photo caption: Riverside’s Kirsten Snyder, brought her daughter Addison Snyder and mother Norma Nelson to enjoy free afternoon tea, canapés, cake, plants, a book signing and new Dolls with Addison’s American Girl Doll.

    Photo caption: Riverside’s Kirsten Snyder, brought her daughter Addison Snyder and mother Norma Nelson to enjoy free afternoon tea, canapés, cake, plants, a book signing and new Dolls with Addison’s American Girl Doll.

    Photo caption: “Thank you for the party,” said Yvonne Reed. She brought her granddaughter DaVyne McCrumb.

    Photo caption: “Thank you for the party,” said Yvonne Reed. She brought her granddaughter DaVyne McCrumb.

    Photo caption: (From left) San Bernadino City Library Director Ed Erjavek, Assemblymember (retired) and San Bernardino City Library Foundation Board member Cheryl Brown and Library Foundation President Arlington Rodgers, Jr., welcomed families to the American Girl Doll “Tea Party.”

    Photo caption: (From left) San Bernadino City Library Director Ed Erjavek, Assemblymember (retired) and San Bernardino City Library Foundation Board member Cheryl Brown and Library Foundation President Arlington Rodgers, Jr., welcomed families to the American Girl Doll “Tea Party.”

    San Bernardino Residents Esgar, and Paloma Rodriguez brought their daughter Everly to the American Girl Doll Tea Party.

    Photo caption: Angela Encinas, San Bernardino Children's Librarian reading from a page from a child’s journal imagine the girl’s surprise and her surprise that the girl and her mother were in the audience.

    Photo caption: Angela Encinas, San Bernardino Children’s Librarian reading from a page from a child’s journal imagine the girl’s surprise and her surprise that the girl and her mother were in the audience.

    Photo caption: University of California local Master Gardener/Master Preserver program members taught the children how to plant seeds.

    Photo caption: University of California local Master Gardener/Master Preserver program members taught the children how to make seed paper.

    Photo caption: Amelie and Noé both brought their dolls and mom Ruth Soto was happy to bring them. “We are having so much fun. Thank you for having this,” said Ruth.

    Photo caption: Amelie and Noé both brought their dolls and mom Ruth Soto was happy to bring them. “We are having so much fun. Thank you for having this,” said Ruth.

    Photo caption: Blanca Lopez from San Bernardino brought her daughters Kailey and Allison Becerril, who are excited about their new milkweed plant. “We are going to have lots of butterflies at our house,” said Allison.

    Photo caption: Blanca Lopez from San Bernardino brought her daughters Kailey and Allison Becerril, who are excited about their new milkweed plant. “We are going to have lots of butterflies at our house,” said Allison.

    DSC06632 Photo caption: Dr. Mildred Dalton Henry spoke of resilience and held a book signing.

    DSC06611 Photo Caption: Principal Dr. Christopher Tickell, said he plans to make this a signature event of his school for the foreseeable future. “ I was so excited to be a part of such an amazing event. To see so many people working so hard together to make something special for our community. I look forward to hosting this tea again and again and again.”

    DSC06611 Photo Caption: Principal Dr. Christopher Tickell, said he plans to make this a signature event of his school for the foreseeable future. “ I was so excited to be a part of such an amazing event. To see so many people working so hard together to make something special for our community. I look forward to hosting this tea again and again and again.”

    Photo caption: Riverside’s James Chung came with his wife Seonhye Chung

    Photo caption: Riverside’s James Chung came with his wife Seonhye Chung.

    Photo caption: Robert, Cynthia, Ace, and Aviana Love, came from Hesperia. Ace won a book in the raffle. Cynthia found the event online and “my daughter loves her doll, so we had to come, and we had a great time at the American Girl Doll 'Tea Party.'”

    Photo caption: Robert, Cynthia, Ace, and Aviana Love, came from Hesperia. Ace won a book in the raffle. Cynthia found the event online and “my daughter loves her doll, so we had to come, and we had a great time at the American Girl Doll ‘Tea Party.”

    Photo caption: Library Foundation Board Secretary Debra A. Fields presents books to Serinitee-Love Taylor, Samauri-James Thompson, and Trinity-Rose Thompson at the American Girl Doll “Tea Party."

    Photo caption: Library Foundation Board Secretary Debra A. Fields presents books to Serinitee-Love Taylor, Samauri-James Thompson, and Trinity-Rose Thompson at the American Girl Doll “Tea Party.”

    Photo Caption: Lynn Summers presented the University of California’s local Master Gardener/Master Food Preserver program, and served as MC. Here Summers describes the American Girl Dolls. Also introduced was Corrine Tan the 2022 Doll of the Year who is from Vietnam.

    Photo Caption: Lynn Summers presented the University of California’s local Master Gardener/Master Food Preserver program, and served as MC. Here Summers describes the American Girl Dolls. Also introduced was Corrine Tan the 2022 Doll of the Year who is from Vietnam.

     

    Photo caption: San Bernardino City School Board member, Dr. Gwen Rodgers, and San Bernardino 6th Ward City Council member Kimberley Calvin

    Photo caption: San Bernardino City School Board member, Dr. Gwen Rodgers, and San Bernardino 6th Ward City Council member Kimberley Calvin.

    Photo caption: Girls with plants! Angela Encinas, San Bernardino Children's Librarian said, “The library's American Girl Doll collection reflects the ethnic diversity of our community and youngsters can check out dolls that look like them. They can even customize them using the accessories that come with each doll."

    Photo caption: Girls with plants! Angela Encinas, San Bernardino Children’s Librarian said, “The library’s American Girl Doll collection reflects the ethnic diversity of our community and youngsters can check out dolls that look like them. They can even customize them using the accessories that come with each doll.”

    The Unforgettables Foundation in Southern California seek to help with funeral funds sent for Kentucky flood victims

    left to Right:  Dr. Moliterno, Tim Evans and Dr. Schell.  Drs. Randy Schell and David Moliterno of Lexington, Kentucky’s University of Kentucky Medical School rode from the Canadian border near Bellingham, Washington to San Diego on the Mexico line – 2,400 miles to raise funds for burials assisted by The Unforgettables Foundation (www.unforgettables.org).

    Left to Right: Dr. Moliterno, Tim Evans and Dr. Schell. Drs. Randy Schell and David Moliterno of Lexington, Kentucky’s University of Kentucky Medical School rode from the Canadian border near Bellingham, Washington to San Diego on the Mexico line – 2,400 miles to raise funds for burials assisted by The Unforgettables Foundation (www.unforgettables.org).

    The Unforgettables Foundation (“TUF”) has a chapter in a few states across the United States, as well as in the province of Ontario in Canada.  Based in Redlands, California, of the Inland Empire and Inland Southern California region, the 22-year-old 501 (c)(3) non-profit is unique in its mission to aid and support at-risk, grief-stricken, and cash-strapped parents who are struggling with a child’s funeral costs.

    The Unforgettables has existing extension affiliates in Ohio, Nevada, Tennessee, as well as, soon in Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico, the generation group cares about families.

    Last summer, Drs. Randy Schell and David Moliterno of Lexington, Kentucky’s University of Kentucky Medical School rode from the Canadian border near Bellingham, Washington to San Diego on the Mexico line – 2,400 miles to raise funds for burials assisted by The Unforgettables Foundation (www.unforgettables.org).

    It was called Dr. Randy’s Unforgettable Ride 2.0.  About a year after Randy’s Ride through the mountains and coast of Washington, Oregon & California during about 30 days in August and September 2021, Kentucky experienced some terrible natural disaster flooding and some children drowned and died.

    TUF will be doing what it can to help defray the burial costs for the pending funerals in Kentucky.  Volunteers, including Lois Schell, RN and Brooke Pernice, country western/gospel recording artist and chaplain in Kentucky, will be working with the Board of TUF in the headquarter office in California to step up.

    Says TUF CEO and Founder, a former children’s hospital chaplain in Loma Linda, California, Tim Evans, “We care about families who have lost children and try to help cover some of the funeral costs in order to show that the community cares about the concerns of the parents on a spiritual, emotional, social and financial level.  All can donate at www.unforgettables.org”.

    Drs. Randy Schell and David Moliterno who rode together all the over 2,400 miles of last summer/fall’s Dr. Randy’s Unforgettable Ride 2.0 will be doing an international version in 2022 on the Bamboo Road through Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia called Drs. David & Randy’s Unforgettable Global Ride 1.0.

    Some of the funds raised will go to setting up the new Kentucky chapter of TUF and in specific to the special Kentucky for Kids special flood crisis fund.

    Donate at the website at www.unforgettables.org.  All donations go to the mission of assisting cash-strapped, at risk and grief-stricken parents struggling with the child’s funeral costs.

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    Helping Single Women in Need, and Men Or Women With Children, Get Back in Control Of Their Lives

    The Salvation Army Hospitality House Program Manager Naomi Goforth

    “All of us who are part of the Hospitality House team love being able to help single women in need, and men or women with children, get back in control of their lives.”

    (San Bernardino, Calif.) The San Bernardino Salvation Army Hospitality House stands ready to house homeless families and single women who need temporary, stable shelter. Their target population also includes multi-generational families, and single men with children as well.

    “The Salvation Army Hospitality House serves as a safe refuge that provides residents with a supportive, caring environment and all the resources they need to deal with a wide variety of personal and/or family problems. It all starts with emergency shelter that can keep participants safely housed for 30, 60, or 90 days, depending on their circumstances,” says Program Manager Naomi Goforth.

    At intake, each new arrival is assessed by trained Salvation Army intake staff.  Once the scope of a client’s needs has been determined, each family is given a detailed individualized case plan and assigned to a case manager who will maintain close contact during their entire stay.

    Each family’s case plan includes a comprehensive goals and objectives that cover their intake, transition to permanent housing, help finding a steady job, legal advocacy, child welfare aid, and education. Every resident is treated as an individual with individual needs and every case is different and gets a customized case plan.

    “People who come to Hospitality House may have been sleeping in their cars or were recently released from a hospital. At intake, each new resident gets clothing, bed linens, hygiene products, and a chance to take a breath after whatever ordeal they have just gone through,” says Goforth.

    “I didn’t know what I was going to do,” says one recent Hospitality House graduate.

    “I’m a single mom and I lost my job during the pandemic. Thank goodness, at least my 15-year-old car was paid off and when we were no longer able to pay rent, that’s where we slept. I heard about Hospitality House from a friend and the people there have helped me find a new job, secure a place to live, and even got me enrolled in a course that’s going to add to my skill set so I can advance in my new-found career.”

    Goforth says, “Our residents don’t just sit around and spin their wheels. They actively work their case plan. Our case managers are good at finding each individual’s motivation to resolve their homelessness and get back on their feet.”

    “Sometimes, that may include a referral to one of our partner agencies for things like mental health services, substance use, and legal aid. Whatever they need, we can either provide help in-house or get them connected to the right providers,” says Goforth.

    As current resident K.L. notes, “I had a pretty bad rent history and I knew not many landlords would want to take a chance on me, even though I now have a decent job. But the Salvation Army has helped me reestablish a better tenant history and now I have a place lined up to move to when my stay here ends next week.”

    To talk with a Hospitality House representative, call (909) 888-4880 or visit the website athttps://www.salvationarmyusa.org/usn/equip-families/.

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    About the Salvation Army

    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. To donate, call 1-800 SATRUCK.

     

    Salvation Army-PR-1214.2  Hospitality House #1

    Free Meals from The Salvation Army

      The Salvation Army is ready to help youThe Salvation Army is ready to help with free meals and food boxes for your entire family.

    All the food here is excellent and balanced. I feel much better, more energetic, and more healthy. A million thank-yous!”

     

    (San Bernardino, Calif.) The San Bernardino area Salvation Army Summer Meals Program is in full swing and ready to help area residents enjoy good-tasting and healthy hot meals.

    Because the Salvation Army’s operations are so efficient, a gift of just $1.28 is enough to provide a nutritious meal for a hungry child, homeless adult, or struggling senior.

    The Summer Meals Program at our San Bernardino Hospitality House served 5–7,000 meals per month last year, and we expect that because of inflation and a slowing economy, we will be serving more this year,” says San Bernardino Corps Major Isaias Braga.

    As one retired healthcare worker put it, “All the food here is excellent and balanced. I feel much better, more energetic, and more healthy. A million thank-yous!”

    Because of the current Covid situation, sit-down meals are served only to Hospitality House residents, located at 925 West Tenth Street, San Bernardino. Nonetheless, to-go hot meals in boxes are being distributed to community members in need at that location. Community meals are served from 4:30 to 5:30 pm six days per week, Sunday through Friday, and closed Saturday.

    In addition to the to-go hot meals offered at the Hospitality House, the Salvation Army also distributes non-perishable food items and fresh meat through a community food distribution program on the first, second and third Thursdays of each month from 9:00 to 11:30 am.

    On the first Thursday, this takes place at the Redlands Corps facility, 838 Alta St., Redlands, 92374; on the second and third Thursdays, at the San Bernardino Corps warehouse facility at the San Bernardino Airport, 295 North Leland Norton Way, San Bernardino, 92408.

    To find out more about the Salvation Army’s Summer Meals Program and other Salvation Army programs, visit their website at https://sanbernardino.salvationarmy.org/

     

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    About the Salvation Army

    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. To donate go to: www.salvationarmyusa.org