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    Posts Tagged ‘San Bernardino’

    First, Second and Third-Hand Smoke Threatens Lives

    The San Bernardino County Tobacco Control Program serves in the capacity of local lead agency for tobacco prevention, education and control efforts in San Bernardino County. With funding support from the California Department of Public Health – Tobacco Control Program, SBCTCP is administered by the California Health Collaborative to implement a comprehensive tobacco control plan
    Coalition Members left to right back row: Lynda Barbour, Susan Heppner, Evi Hernandez, Roberto Terrones, Clara Omogbai, Jennifer Harmon.  Front Row: Terry Roberts, Cynthia Turk, Maggie Acuna

    (San Bernardino, CA) Where there’s smoke, there’s fire. Where there’s no smoke, there’s a firestorm.
    Most people know that smoking and secondhand smoke are harmful to their health but very few are aware about the dangers of “third-hand smoke” exposure.

    Third-hand smoke is the residue from tobacco smoke that accumulates on surfaces. It sticks to walls, windows and furniture or can settle as toxic dust in homes and cars. It even sticks to clothing and hair. The residue builds up in the environment, becoming more toxic over time, according to TobaccoFreeCA.com.
    In San Bernardino County, the California Health Collaborative (CHC) has been crusading for tobacco-free apartment units since 2015. Through voluntary tobacco-free housing policies, CHC touts the benefits for renters, property managers and owners, said Roberto A. Terrones, Program Coordinator for San Bernardino County’s Tobacco Control Program.

    Terrones said that many in the housing industry expect for tenants of apartment buildings to be against these types of tobacco free policies, but that is not the local nor state-wide sentiment when it comes to these changes. While there has been some blowback, he said, the majority of tenants appreciate the new rules.
    “We survey the tenants before we go smoke free. Some people think these smoking policies aren’t popular but we’ve seen that a lot of people are for it,” Terrones said. “People that were opposed don’t always smoke but they see it as a right being taken away. We’re not telling you that you can’t smoke but you have to smoke somewhere else outside of the property.”

    One-third of Californians live in multi-unit housing, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Units share common walls, floors or a ceiling, which means that millions may be exposed to secondhand smoke even if they do not allow smoking in their home.

    Nine out of 10 people do not smoke in their homes, Terrones said. About seven out of ten people who want tobacco free-housing are people that don’t smoke.

    The importance of having tobacco-free housing is to protect the health of tenants, said Evi Hernandez, CHC Director of Program Services. Many times, Hernandez said, they are protecting people that cannot afford to live in single-family homes and those at highest risk for serious illness caused by tobacco smoke exposure, including children and the elderly.

    “Among other things, any contact with third-hand smoke can cause skin irritation, trigger asthma attacks and lead to respiratory illnesses,” Hernandez said.” You don’t really see it in the form of smoke and if you’re not aware that it’s there, you can’t avoid it.”

    Terrones said the county has been successful with subsidized housing because while many of the tenants’ love where they live, the smoke is killing them, he said. And for financial reasons, they are unable to move. “It’s essentially a trap,” Terrones said. “They can’t just pick up and leave because of their financial situation.”

    Some have agreed to set aside a certain percentage of smoke-free units, but as Terrones said, “If you can smell what your neighbor is cooking, you can smell if they’re smoking.”

    Long considered a health hazard, secondhand smoke seeps through doors, open windows, outlets and ventilation systems. The health benefits may be obvious, but decreasing the hidden financial costs are a bonus as well. Estimates to ready a unit for rent after a smoker has lived there could be in the thousands of dollars, Hernandez said.

    “I’ve gone to these multi-complex houses and their blinds are completely yellow. You can’t get rid of the smell in the carpet. Sometimes the smoke is so pervasive it penetrates the walls and a treatment/paint plan can take weeks,” Terrones said. “It’s (another) benefit of multi-unit apartments to go smoke free.”

    When an apartment complex goes tobacco-free, CHC offers a resource directory for tenants that includes local tobacco cessation resources and information about the California Smokers’ Helpline (1-800-NO-BUTTS).

    For further information, contact the County of San Bernardino Tobacco Control Program at (909) 647-4532 or go to sbctcp.blogspot.com

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    About The San Bernardino County Tobacco Control Program (SBCTCP)
    The SBCTCP serves in the capacity of local lead agency for tobacco prevention, education and control efforts in San Bernardino County. With funding support from the California Department of Public Health – Tobacco Control Program, SBCTCP is administered by the California Health Collaborative to implement a comprehensive tobacco control plan that includes the following objectives:

    1) Retain and engage community members representing diverse/priority populations and non-traditional partner agencies in the San Bernardino County Tobacco Control Coalition;
    2) Partner with apartment managers/owners, apartment management companies, the Housing Authority of the County of San Bernardino, and tobacco control stakeholders to guide efforts that result in the adoption of smoke-free policies at multi-unit housing complexes; and
    3) Coordinate efforts by incorporated cities in San Bernardino County to adopt a policy that eliminates sales and distribution of tobacco and/or electronic nicotine delivery devices (ENDD) products in pharmacies where licensed professionals provide health care services.

    Program plan strategies were developed based on results of a community needs assessment and prioritization process and adhere to priority areas and guidelines set forth by the California Tobacco Control Program.

    A Tradition of Christmas Service Continues at The Salvation Army

     

    Daniel Herrera 12, Sonali Herrera 10, mother, Sujana Herrera volunteer to serve at the recent Thanksgiving dinner. They are from Riverside this is their second-year volunteering with The Salvation Army. The annual Christmas Dinner for hundreds of people is at 2626 Pacific St., in San Bernardino on Saturday, December 24 from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

     
    (San Bernardino, Calif.) The San Bernardino Salvation Army Corp (www.salvationarmyusa.org) hosts its annual Christmas Dinner for hundreds of people at its headquarters, 2626 Pacific St., in San Bernardino, CA 92346. This year, the Christmas dinner will be held on Saturday, December 24 from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

    “We share the joy and love of our God who sent his only begotten son, Jesus Christ, to save us from sin.  He taught use to love our neighbors as ourselves.  We share this Christmas meal and meals every day to show those in need that God truly cares for all of his children,” said Major Daniel Henderson, Citadel Corp director.

    Since 1887, the annual San Bernardino Salvation Army Christmas dinner has served thousands of families, mothers, children and men who do not have the means to provide themselves a Christmas dinner.  Some just come to enjoy fellowship with others.

    People come from Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto, and San Bernardino for this annual Christmas celebratory meal.   The dinner often serves more than 300 people.

    “This year, guests will enjoy a turkey dinner with all the trimmings, containing potatoes, gravy, stuffing, vegetables, pie and other food received from donations,” said Lt. Cathie McCully.

    “Every year, volunteers come together to provide the food preparation and service of Christmas meals to dinner guests,” said Major Daniel Henderson, Commander of The Salvation Army San Bernardino Corp. “Our volunteers and staff really do an outstanding job, to make a difference for those who are less fortunate during the holiday season.”

    Many of the services provided by the Salvation Army, such as this annual Community Christmas dinner, are made possible through in-kind donations and money raised through the Red Kettle Bell Ringer campaign.  “It’s one of ministries your donations serve,” said Major Henderson.

    Each Christmas, Inland Empire Salvation Army Corps in eight corps locations combine to serve about 1,800 people holiday meals.

    The hungry families are joined by hundreds of volunteers who help prepare the food and serve meals to the families.  Along with asking volunteers to help serve food, the Salvation Army is encouraging people to donate turkeys or hams, side dishes and other food by calling (909) 888-1336.

    “The San Bernardino Corps also needs food every day for those at our Hospitality House living shelter,” said Lt. Cathie McCully. Up to 100 family members stay in its transitional and emergency family shelters.
    For more information about the Salvation Army Christmas dinner, donations or volunteering for the Christmas dinner at The Salvation Army near you, call or visit the locations below.

    San Bernardino County

    • San Bernardino, 2626 Pacific Avenue, (909) 888-1336.
    • Ontario, 1412 S. Euclid Ave., (909) 986-6748.
    • Victorville, 14585 La Paz Drive, (760) 245-2545.
    • Redlands, 838 Alta St., (909) 792-6868.

     
    Riverside County

    • Riverside, 3695 First Street, (951) 784-3571
    • Moreno Valley, 14075 Frederick St., (951) 653-9131.
    • Hemet, 340 S. Palm Ave., (951) 791-9495.
    • Murrieta, 4020 Los Alamos Rd., (951) 677-1324

    To donate by phone call 1-800-SAL-ARMY (800-725-2769).  Donate on line at: WesternUSA.SalvationArmy.org

    About The Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps
    The Salvation Army may be able to provide emergency services including food; lodging for homeless or displaced families; clothing and furniture; assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) assists rescue workers and evacuees in such disasters as fires.

    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the universal Christian Church, and also offering holistic programs for people of all ages. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination.

    The San Bernardino Corps of The Salvation Army serves Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto, and San Bernardino. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY. Our local number is (909) 888-1336.

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    Salvation Army: Resources Needed to Aid Families in Transition

     

    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and also offers evangelical programs for boys, girls and adults. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY or (909) 888-1336.

    Volunteers help serve 52,504 free, hot, nutritious meals were served to the hungry from The Salvation Army in San Bernardino. Now the corps needs help to fund services.

    San Bernardino, Calif. – The Inland Empire branch of the Salvation Army today issued an urgent appeal to the community for resources to provide support to area families in need. The San Bernardino Citadel Corps, which serves Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto and San Bernardino, is reporting a financial deficit of $45,000 (now $90,000), citing a shift in contributions following the December 2 terrorist attack.
    The public is encouraged to donate money, food, and goods and services to help replenish Salvation Army coffers, and to consider including the Salvation Army in their charitable giving and estate plans. Contributions can be made online at www.SalvationArmyUSA.org or by calling 1-800-SAL-ARMY.
    “The Salvation Army is proud to have been a part of the community outpouring of support to the victims and families affected by the December 2 tragedy,” said Anne Metu, program director for the organization’s Transitional Living Center. “Now, we are asking the community to help us rebuild our resources so that we can continue providing assistance to families with urgent needs for food, shelter and child care.”
    Metu cited an example of a family—a mother and her six children, ages 3 to 13—who relied on the Salvation Army Emergency Shelter and Transitional Living Program when evicted from their home: “Mona” and the children’s father had separated and she did not have sufficient income to house, feed and clothe the family.
    After a short stay in the shelter, she found employment and was accepted into transitional housing, but soon lost her job when she could not find childcare during the children’s Spring Break from school. With support from the staff and residents at the Transitional Living Program, Mona was able to return to work and was soon reunited with the children’s father.
    Mona and her husband now live in affordable housing as a family unit and the children continue to participate in Salvation Army youth programs, mentoring other children who are faced with similar life circumstances.
    Since 1887, the San Bernardino Corps has helped residents of the San Bernardino area overcome life’s challenges. Its current service area is San Bernardino, Highland, Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace and Rialto.
    Donations may always be made online at www.SalvationArmyUSA.org, or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY.
    For help or for more information call Ms. Anne Metu, Program Director at the Transitional Living Center, (909) 888-4880 or anne.metu@usw.salvationarmy.org or visit the Website at: www.salvationarmyusa.org
    About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps
    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and also offers evangelical programs for boys, girls and adults. One of the largest, and most effective, charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination.

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    Time for Summer Cleaning – Send Unwanted Items to the Salvation Army

     The Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Center of San Bernardino always seeks donations of clothes and other household items, both large and small, to supply its seven Family Stores. Money raised by sale of household items at the Family Stores, and of cars and other vehicles at its warehouse, fund the Adult Rehabilitation Center’s drug and alcohol rehabilitation program. To donate, call 1-800 SATRUCK. Photo by Chris Sloan

    The Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Center of San Bernardino always seeks donations of clothes and other household items, both large and small, to supply its seven Family Stores. Money raised by sale of household items at the Family Stores, and of cars and other vehicles at its warehouse, fund the Adult Rehabilitation Center’s drug and alcohol rehabilitation program. To donate, call 1-800 SATRUCK. Photo by Chris Sloan

     
    Patricia Luna, warehouse supervisor, prices clothing donated to the Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Center. The Adult Rehabilitation Center seeks donations of all household items for its seven Family Stores, proceeds of which fund the drug and alcohol rehabilitation program. Photo by Chris Sloan

    Patricia Luna, warehouse supervisor, prices clothing donated to the Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Center. The Adult Rehabilitation Center seeks donations of all household items for its seven Family Stores, proceeds of which fund the drug and alcohol rehabilitation program. Photo by Chris Sloan

     (SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.) Summer has arrived, which means it’s time for summer clean up ! Get rid of unwanted appliances, furniture, clothes and other items easily by calling 1-800 SATRUCK (1-800-728-7825) to arrange for The Salvation Army to pick them up. Or visit our website at www.satruck.org .
    What’s no longer useful to you may be just what a thrift store bargain-shopper falls in love with, or may be exactly what a family needs but can’t afford to buy in a department store.
    “No matter who buys them, donations to the local Salvation Army Family Stores, purveyors of fine used goods, will use the money to help men to overcome drug or alcohol addiction,” said Lt. Regina Verdugo, administrator.
    “We need donations of every kind,” said Jack Katzman, member of San Bernardino’s Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Center Advisory Board. “We receive no other funds, and these days, donations are at an all-time low.”
    “You can donate cars, trucks, boats, clothing, toys, furniture, appliances and even property,” said Katzman.
    The Salvation Army will send a truck to pick up donations from most addresses. The donations can be small or large, as long as they fit into huge the delivery trucks.
    Donors also can bring small items to any of The Salvation Army’s Family Stores, or larger items, such as cars, to the Adult Rehabilitation Center warehouse, which has a location in San Bernardino at 363 S. Doolittle Road.
    San Bernardino’s Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Center operates five Family Stores, in San Bernardino, Fontana, Redlands, Hesperia and Victorville.
    The Family Stores raise almost all of the program’s revenue and teach the rehabilitation center’s residents new job skills, thus helping them become more productive members of society after they complete the program. The beneficiaries learn the value of working hard, cooperating with others and having goals.
    Men in San Bernardino County or Pomona Valley who are seeking help to overcome drug or alcohol addiction should call the Adult Rehabilitation Center in San Bernardino at (909) 889-9605. The Salvation Army offers a similar program for men in Riverside County; for more information about that program, call (951) 940-5790.
    Women who want help ending drug or alcohol addiction can call Adult Rehabilitation Centers for them by calling the center in Anaheim at (714) 758-0414, or the center in San Diego at (619) 239-4037.
    About the Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Center
    The Adult Rehabilitation Center is a six-month social model program, which combines a comprehensive rehabilitation program and work therapy for men who wish to overcome drug or alcohol addiction. These men attend individual and group counseling, substance abuse education, 12-Step meetings, and learn about stress management, anger management, parenting and overcoming addiction, as well as spiritual counseling. Re-entry and alumni supports services are also provided. Many recreational activities are also provided, which alumni can continue after their treatment as part of a sober lifestyle.
    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. To donate, call 1-800 SATRUCK.
     

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    The Salvation Army Holds Easter Sunrise Service

    Major Dan and Captain Anya Henderson welcome you to Easter Sunrise Service.

    Major Dan and Captain Anya Henderson welcome you to Easter Sunrise Service.

    (SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.) The Salvation Army Corps of San Bernardino invites the public to attend its Easter Sunrise services at its new location at 2626 Pacific Avenue, 92346, at 6:30 a.m.
    “We are excited to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus Christ at our new location in eastern San Bernardino,” said Major Daniel Henderson pastor and director of the local corps.
    There is lots of free parking available on the four-and-a-half-acre campus.
    For more information call (909) 888-1336.
    About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps
    The Salvation Army provides emergency services including food, lodging for homeless or displaced families, and single women; clothing and furniture; and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) assists rescue workers and evacuees in such disasters as fires.
    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and also offers evangelical programs for boys, girls and adults. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY. Our local number is (909) 888-1336.

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    The Salvation Army San Bernardino Expands in San Bernardino

    (San Bernardino, Calif.) The Salvation Army Corps of San Bernardino has moved from its downtown location on Fifth Street to its new location at 2626 Pacific Avenue, San Bernardino, CA 92346. The new location is just down the street from Pacific High School and next door to the San Bernardino City soccer fields.
    The move happened almost a year ago in early May, however the Salvation Army continues to serve meals at the Fifth Street location at 4:45 p.m. every day. “Because of our meals service has not stopped, some people don’t know we moved,” said Major Henderson.
    Last year The Salvation Army served 89,282 meals to the hungry, much of that at the Fifth street location. The Salvation Army supports those in need without discrimination.
    “The plan is to move daily meal service to our Hospitality House, located on 10th street, after necessary remodeling and expansion is completed. The Hospitality House and Transitional Living Center move families and single women from homelessness to permanent housing in as few as 18 months. People leaving our program are equipped to live life successfully,” said Major Henderson
    “The Transitional Living Center is a successful program with 94 percent of families completing the program to exit to permanent housing,” said Anne Metu, MILR, CADC-II director of the Transitional Housing Center and Homeless Shelter.
    “It is important for those in need, and the people that help them, to know our offices have moved to the new location,” said Major Henderson.
    “The Salvation Army serves people in need of help providing food, lodging for homeless or displaced families and single women; clothing and furniture; and transportation when funds are available. Our new 10,000 square foot facilities gives us more room for children’s after school programs, church services, character building programs for youth, and other needed services.”
    Since 1887, the San Bernardino Corps has helped residents of the San Bernardino area overcome life’s challenges. Its current service area is San Bernardino, Highland, Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace and Rialto.
    Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY. For help or for more information call (909) 888-1336.
    About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps
    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and also offers evangelical programs for boys, girls and adults. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination

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    The Boy Scouts Award Whitney M. Young Jr. Service Honor to Waudieur “Woodie" Rucker- Hughes and Carl M. Dameron

     

    Carl M. Dameron Founder and creative director of Dameron Communications Photo by Robert A. Whitehead/CSUSB

    As a former scout I am honored to serve scouting and to receive the prestigious The Whitney M. Young Jr. Service Award.” Photo by Robert A. Whitehead/CSUSB

     

    “I am honored to be one of the recipients of the Boy Scouts of America Whitney M. Young Jr. Award," said Waudieur “Woodie" Rucker- Hughes.

    “I am honored to be one of the recipients of the Boy Scouts of America Whitney M. Young Jr. Award,” said Waudieur “Woodie” Rucker- Hughes.

    (San Bernardino Calif.) The Boy Scouts of America California Inland Empire will honor Waudieur “Woodie” Rucker-Hughes, Child Welfare and Attendance Manager, Riverside Unified School District and Carl M. Dameron, Creative Director, Dameron Communications. They are the 2016 Whitney M. Young Jr. Service Award Honorees.

    The gala is Thursday, March 10, 2016 at 6:00 p.m. at Shandin Hills Golf Club located at 3380 Little Mountain Drive in San Bernardino. A table of 8, a full page ad in the program, and camp sponsorship for 3 youth is $1,000. Individual tickets are $75.

    The Whitney M. Young Jr. Service Award is to recognize outstanding service by an individual for demonstrated involvement in the development and implementation of Scouting opportunities for youth from rural or low-income urban backgrounds-this in fulfillment of Dr. Young’s dream of justice and equality for all.

    The proceeds from The Whitney M. Young Jr. Service Award Dinner will support the Assistance to Others Fund of the California Inland Empire Council, Boy Scouts of America, designed to help provide financial outreach for those youth and families in need of Scout registration fees, camperships, Scouting handbooks, uniform needs and training scholarships.

    Whitney Moore Young, Jr. was an American civil rights leader, born July 31, 1921 and died March 11, 1971.

    He spent most of his career working to end employment discrimination in the United States and turning the National Urban League from a relatively passive civil rights organization into one that aggressively worked for equitable access to socioeconomic opportunity for the historically disenfranchised.

    On March 11, 1971, Whitney Young died of a heart attack after swimming with friends in Lagos, Nigeria. President Nixon sent a plane to Nigeria to collect Young’s body and traveled to Kentucky to deliver the eulogy at Young’s funeral.

    “Whitney understood power, he understood politics, and most of all he understood people. They said Martin was in the streets, Roy and Thurgood were in the courts, and Whitney was in the boardroom. One could not have been successful without the other.”  – Vernon Jordan, CEO National Urban League
    “I am honored to be one of the recipients of the Boy Scouts of America Whitney M. Young Jr. Award. Mr. Young was a true Civil Rights advocate, a shrewd and politically aware advisor to President Lyndon Johnson, the president who history notes had some of the greatest Civil Rights legislation and programs created and passed during his tenure, said Rucker-Hughes.

    She added, “Mr. Young was also the recipient of a Presidential Medal of Freedom and in his capacity as a leader of the Urban League, he was a co-sponsor of the historic March on Washington which I had the privilege of participating in. I thank everyone who thought enough of me to nominate me for this Award.”
    Rucker-Hughes is currently the Child Welfare and Attendance Manager for the Riverside Unified School District’s Pupil Services Department. As the State mandated District Homeless and Foster Liaison she and her staff work to serve the needs of students in order to prevent educational barriers.

    In addition to her busy career, Rucker-Hughes is also the current President of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) Riverside Branch; a member of Chief of Police, Sergio Diaz’s “Citizen’s Advisory Board”; and Amos Temple CME Church’s Chancel Choir. She has served on the Trustee Board of Amos Temple CME Church.

    Rucker-Hughes has meritoriously served the Riverside community at large as a humanitarian and pillar. She most recently was appointed to the California-Hawaii State NAACP Executive Committee, where she serves as its South East Area Director. Woodie also serves as the NAACP Region 1 Secretary, an elected position that she has held since 2010.

    Her most recent honors have included being appointed to the Citizen’s Advisory Board for the State of California Highway Patrol, where she advises the HWP Commissioner on matters affecting the Highway Patrol. In February of 2015 Woodie was presented the 61st Assembly District’s Women of Distinction Award by Assemblyman Jose Medina. She was honored in recognition of her outstanding contributions to the community.

    Dameron is the founder and creative director at Dameron Communications advertising and public relations agency serving California since 1989. He has placed stories with the most prestigious and popular media in the nation including the New York Times, Washington Post and NBC news.

    “I am pleased to serve my community and help where ever I can,” said Dameron. “As a former scout I am honored to serve scouting and to receive the prestigious The Whitney M. Young Jr. Service Award.”
    Since 1989 Dameron has worked for some of the area’s biggest names: California Portland Cement Company, Sprint, The Salvation Army, Capstone Turbine, The South Coast Air Quality Management District, The Art Institute of California, Argosy University, The California Department of Education, Dukes-Dukes and Associates, Meta Housing, the cities of Colton, San Bernardino and Rialto, and San Bernardino and Riverside counties, helping them with what he calls “Advertising and public relations that works.”
    Committed to the Inland Empire Dameron contributes his marketing skills to help non-profits elevate awareness of their service and increase donations.

    A few of the companies Dameron has worked with include: The Boys Scouts, The Salvation Army, Greater Riverside Chamber of Commerce, Inland Empire African American Chamber of Commerce, California State University San Bernardino, Argosy University, The San Bernardino Black Cultural Foundation, Habitat for Humanity, San Bernardino Bicentennial Committee and Time for Change.

    Dameron has received awards and recognition from: The American Advertising Federation, The League of Women’s Voters, the San Bernardino Black Cultural Foundation, Entrepreneur of the year finalist, The Victorville African American Chamber of Commerce, Who’s Who in advertising and public relations
    Many Cultures-One Mission – the mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Law.

    The California Inland Empire Council has been serving youth of the Riverside and San Bernardino Counties for over 92 years. The current council was formed in 1973 through the merger of the Arrowhead Area, Grayback and Riverside Councils.  In 2006, a portion of the Old Baldy Council merged into the California Inland Empire Council.

    The council has served hundreds of thousands of youth over the years. Its Scouts and leaders have provided innumerable hours of service to communities and individuals.

    Council territory includes all of Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, and stretches from Fort Irwin and Death Valley to Temecula and Indio; Ontario and Barstow to the Arizona and Nevada borders. The area we serve covers some of the fastest growing metropolitan areas in the nation, National Parks and Forests, rural farmland, military bases, and open desert.

    For more information on call Tracy Youden at (909) 793-2463 extension 123.

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    LaSalle Medical Associates Three Decades of Making People Healthier

    LaSalle Medical Associates, Celebrates 30 years of medical service with . Left to right: Anna Canton, Human Resource Manager, Kristina Hlebo, Finance Assistant, Carl Meier, executive vice president, Dr. Albert Arteaga CEO, Alexandra Acosta, Director of Finance and Lizette Noriega, Human Resource AssistantKristina Hlebo, Finance Assistant Alexandra Acosta, Director of Finance Lizette Noriega, Human Resource Assistant

    LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc Celebrates 30 years of medical service. Left to right: Anna Canton, Human Resource Manager, Kristina Hlebo, Finance Assistant, Carl Meier, executive vice president, Dr. Albert Arteaga CEO, Alexandra Acosta, Director of Finance and Lizette Noriega, Human Resource Assistant, Kristina Hlebo, Finance Assistant, Alexandra Acosta, Director of Finance and Lizette Noriega, Human Resource Assistant.

    See the entire LaSalle Professional staff at: LaSalle Medical Associates Professional Team

     
    (SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.) In June of 1984, a young doctor and his wife, a nurse, opened a family medical practice called LaSalle Medical Associates in Fontana. Their goal: provide affordable health care, with dignity and respect, to all in the Inland Empire at http://knockyourhealth.com/wbv/.
     
    Three decades later, Dr. Albert and Maria Arteaga have gone far beyond making their goal a reality. They are now recognized as one of the leading health care providers in the Inland Empire, if not all of California.
     
    “We have had some markers of success,” Dr. Arteaga says. “We went from two employees – my wife and I – to a fully staffed clinic. We opened more clinics. Then we started our own IPA (independent practice association) to keep up with new demands to make health care more and more efficient.  We are making people healthier.”
     
    “It has always been our goal to treat as many patients as we could while giving them the best health care possible,” he said.
    Some, who have recognized LaSalle Medical Associates as a leader in health care along with www.motorcyclepundit.com , by giving them awards for their endeavors, include:

    • The federal Center for Disease Control, which recognized Dr. Arteaga as California’s first Childhood Immunization Champion. This award recognized his efforts in educating the parents of LaSalle’s pediatric patients, and the greater Inland Empire community, of the importance of childhood immunizations
    • The California Medical Association, which recognized Dr. Arteaga with its Ethnic Physician’s Leadership Award, recognizing his contributions to improving health care in the Latino community
    • The San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors Resolution Award for outstanding community efforts
    • The San Bernardino County Medical Society’s Merlin Hendrickson, M.D. Award for Outstanding Contribution to the Community. Dr. Arteaga was recognized for his efforts to provide health services to Inland Empire children.
    • Inland Empire Health Plan (IEHP), as Riverside and San Bernardino counties’ best health care provider, and for being one of the top enrollers in all of California in the state’s former Healthy Families program
    • The African American Health Initiative as a model provider in a two-year study of Black health care in San Bernardino County.
    • Hispanic Lifestyle Magazine, which recognized LaSalle Medical Associates as one of the top 15 Latino-owned businesses in the Inland Empire
    “As pediatricians, we strive for 100 percent immunizations of pediatric patients and, while that’s probably a utopian objective, our goal is to get as close as to that 100 percent as we can,’’ says Dr. Albert Arteaga, president and founder of LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc. . “This CDC recognition is the fruit of two to three years of intense labor on part of me and staff.”

    “As pediatricians, we strive for 100 percent immunizations of pediatric patients and, while that’s probably a utopian objective, our goal is to get as close as to that 100 percent as we can,’’ says Dr. Albert Arteaga, president and founder of LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc. . “This CDC recognition is the fruit of two to three years of intense labor on part of me and staff.”

    Despite all this success, it hasn’t always been an easy path for the Arteagas.
     
    “Life doesn’t always play out as you expect,” Dr. Arteaga said. “That is certainly true in my life as a health care provider. Good intentions require good management. Providing good management has been every bit as challenging as my years in medical school were more than three decades ago!”
     
    One of the biggest changes in health care took place just this year. In 2014, Covered California part of the federal Affordable Health Care Act – which Dr. Arteaga has long been a champion of – came into being.
     
    “Although Covered California does not yet mean everyone has insurance, it does mean that many patients who couldn’t afford health care before now can do so,” Dr. Arteaga said. “Health care is no longer an out-of-reach luxury for those who couldn’t afford insurance, but is a basic right for everyone
     
    Dr. Arteaga has always thought that health care is a basic right, and has operated LaSalle Medical Associates as if that were the case.
     
    Dr. Arteaga targeted his marketing to Latinos and low-income people who were underserved.  Providing high quality medical services to underserved populations were crucial to the success of LaSalle Medical Associates.  LaSalle Medical Associates later expanded from Fontana to San Bernardino and Hesperia. These communities have many low-income people in need of quality affordable medical services.
     
    He also is Latino, so he easily related to his Latino patients in ways they appreciated. They told friends and family about La Salle Medical Associates, which caused his popularity in the Inland Empire’s Latino culture to swell.
     
    Dr. Arteaga has always believed that his key to business success was finding a way to get paid for their services, instead of telling patients they had to figure that out on their own before seeing him. For most of LaSalle’s history, that business model meant LaSalle employees educated patients about their health care insurance options.
     
    Most patients LaSalle saw over the years qualified for either Medi-Cal or Healthy Families. The latter, which like Medi-Cal was run by the state of California, offered low to moderate-income parents who didn’t qualify for Medi-Cal a subsidy for the health care of their children from birth to age 19.
     

    Things have changed in the last two years. In 2013, California got a head start on the Affordable Care Act; they created Covered California and merged Healthy Families and Medi-Cal together. 

     
    In 2014, one of the key Covered California’s requirements is everyone must have health insurance or pay a penalty. This means, many patients applied and signed up for Covered California, Medi-Cal or other insurance first, and then choose or are assigned to LaSalle Medical Associates.
     
    Consequently, rather than informing new patients of their insurance options, LaSalle Medical Associates employees now more likely are helping the patients understand how their health insurance system works.
    Dr. Arteaga acknowledges the Covered California has brought changes some people will take a while to get accustomed to. One of these is a concept called managed care.
     
    “The structure of the Covered California means many people, both those who had some other type of insurance and those who were uninsured, are now in managed care for the first time,” he said.
     
    Managed care is called this because it requires a doctor, such as one of the physicians in LaSalle Medical Associates, to coordinate patients’ health care services. These primary care doctors have a general, family or pediatric practice, and will treat patients for many of their symptoms, but will refer the patients to specialists when more expertise is needed.
     
    Managed care has been around since the 1990s, Dr. Arteaga said, but it has become more popular. It’s usually more cost-efficient to have managed care, he explained, people choose to buy managed care for its lower premiums.
     
    Medi-Cal has used managed care for nearly two decades. Meanwhile, LaSalle Medical Associates, since the beginning, has accepted Medi-Cal when many doctors would not, and now has a reputation among those familiar with Medi-Cal for providing quality services, no matter how payment is provided.
     
    Even though there wasn’t “managed care,” as it now known when Dr. Arteaga started his practice, even back then he was in favor of patients developing close relationships with one family doctor.
     
    “Thirty years ago I wanted to see all the patients, and manage their health care. That has not changed, but I have learned that in order to do so, a physician must take a leadership role. Otherwise, many patients will seek or demand services that are redundant or not needed. Our goal is to make people healthier.”

    Maria and Dr. Albert Arteaga. The California Medical Association awarded Abert Arteaga the “Ethnic Physician’s Leadership Award,” recognizing his contributions to medical care in the Latino community.

    Maria and Dr. Albert Arteaga. The California Medical Association awarded Abert Arteaga the “Ethnic Physician’s Leadership Award,” recognizing his contributions to medical care in the Latino community.

    Dr. Arteaga sees the physician as an advocate for the patient, one who will make sure patients get the services they truly need. Sometimes, just as some patients will push for more health care than is necessary, some insurance companies will resist paying for what a doctor recommends, but that is not the intent of managed care.
     
    “I want the patient, the doctor and the insurance company to develop a positive team, Dr. Arteaga said. “There may be opposition, but that should not stop any of us in trying to make quality health care succeed.”
     
    Besides managed care and its great expansion through the Affordable Care Act, another large change in the health care industry over the last three decades has been more careful monitoring of expenses by insurance companies.
     
    Now, it is better for a medical group like LaSalle Medical Associates to band with even more doctors, so they can take advantage of economies of scale, and provide health care more cost-efficiently.
     
    This is why LaSalle Medical Associates formed an Independent Practice Association (IPA) in 1995, and has grown it to the point it now serves more than 600 medical clinics serving more than 170,000 patients each year in nine California counties.
     
    LaSalle oversees administrative functions of all these medical clinics, although they are owned and manage their patients’ health care separately.
     
    Another move to make health care more efficient, in many ways, is one that LaSalle Medical Associates only recently transitioned to. It now is keeping track of patients’ charts with electronic records, ridding itself of the wall full of patients’ medical records that once were a hallmark of many medical clinics.
     
    “Electronic records make it easier to share patients’ records among a team of doctors who treat one patient, which results in better health care” Dr. Arteaga said. “It is also easier to keep patients’ records confidential this way.”
     
    One other significant change over the last 30 years has been that most patients are more involved in their health care now than they were in 1984.
     
    “They ask more questions now. Because of the Internet, and because people talk more about health care with their friends, patients now have more information. Not all of the information out there is correct, so this means a doctor helps the patient sort the good from the bad, and develop a treatment plan that works. This is another reason why the managed care approach is necessary.”
     
    One thing Dr. Arteaga has learned during his three decades of medical practice is that change can be good. In fact, one thing he loves about being the CEO of LaSalle Medical Associates is that he gets to lead other health care professionals through the changes their industry faces.
     
    “I love being collegial, and helping other doctors learn,” he said. “When they resist change, it is going to be more difficult for them. They should not expect to practice medicine as it was done 30 years ago, or even 10 years ago.”
     
    LaSalle’s clinics are located at 17577 Arrow Blvd. in Fontana phone (909) 823-4454, 16455 Main St. in Hesperia phone (760) 947-2161, and 1505 West 17th St. phone (760) 947-2161 and 565 N. Mt. Vernon Ave. phone (909) 884-9091 in San Bernardino.
     
    For more information about LaSalle Medical Associates, call (909) 890-0407 or go on line to LaSalleMedical.com.
     

    About LaSalle Medical Associates

    LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc., operates four clinics employing more than 120 dedicated healthcare professionals, treating children, adults, and seniors in San Bernardino County.  LaSalle’s patients are primarily served by Medi-Cal and they also accept IEHP, Molina, Blue Cross, Blue Shield, Care 1st, and Health Net and Medicare by Easy Choice Health Plan, Molina and Care1st Health Plans.
     
     
    LaSalle’s clinics are located at 17577 Arrow Blvd. in Fontana phone (909) 823-4454, 16455 Main St. in Hesperia phone (760) 947-2161, and 1505 West 17th St. phone (760) 947-2161 and 565 N. Mt. Vernon Ave. phone (909) 884-9091 in San Bernardino.
     
    LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc., is also an Independent Practice Association (IPA) of independently contracted doctors, hospitals and clinics, delivering high quality patience care with more than 170,000 patient visits per year in Fresno, Kings, Los Angeles, Madera, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Joaquin and Tulare Counties.
     
    LaSalle’s IPA members in the Inland Empire include:  LaSalle Medical Associates, Banning Medical Group and San Bernardino Urological Associates.  Hospital affiliations include: Rancho Springs Medical Center, Arrowhead Regional Medical Center, Community Hospital of San Bernardino, St. Bernadine Medical Center, Mountains Community Hospital, Redland Community Hospital, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Corona Regional Medical Center, Riverside County Medical Center, Parkview Community Hospital, Kaiser Moreno Valley, Kaiser Fontana and Kaiser Riverside.

    Redlands Baseball for Youth Registration Opens for 1,400 Children

    RBY Girls’ Softball is consistently one of the best programs in California. Young ladies from 4-18 learn to play ball and have a great time making new friends in RBY’s safe and well-organized program.  Registration opens online October 31, with onsite dates set for Sunday, November 23 and Saturday, December 6 from 10am to 1pm at the Redlands Community Field, corner of Church and San Bernardino Avenue. For more details and more information, visit RBY.org

    RBY Girls’ Softball is consistently one of the best programs in California. Young ladies from 4-18 learn to play ball and have a great time making new friends in RBY’s safe and well-organized program. Registration opens online October 31, with onsite dates set for Sunday, November 23 and Saturday, December 6 from 10am to 1pm at the Redlands Community Field, corner of Church and San Bernardino Avenue. For more details and more information, visit RBY.org

    ): Players from age 4-18 can experience all the fun and excitement of playing ball in RBY’s safe and well-organized program.  Registration opens online October 31, with onsite dates set for Sunday, November 23 and Saturday, December 6 from 10am to 1pm at the Redlands Community Field, corner of Church and San Bernardino Avenue. For more details and more information, visit RBY.org

    Players from age 4-18 can experience all the fun and excitement of playing ball in RBY’s safe and well-organized program. Registration opens online October 31, with onsite dates set for Sunday, November 23 and Saturday, December 6 from 10am to 1pm at the Redlands Community Field, corner of Church and San Bernardino Avenue. For more details and more information, visit RBY.org

    (Redlands, CA) Just as the World Series is wrapping up another thrilling Major League season, the Redlands Baseball (and Softball) for Youth (RBY) Spring 2015 Season is taking shape and the kids will be creating their own excitement on the Community Fields before you know it.
     
    “Since 1963 RBY have been providing a safe place for the youth of Redlands and surrounding communities to learn and play ball, develop teamwork and build self-confidence while making new friends,” Dan Carranza, president of Redlands Baseball for Youth.
     
    The Redlands Baseball for Youth is a non-profit organization, governed and run solely by more than 300 volunteers. According to Carranza, RBY expects to provide quality baseball and softball program to more than 1,400 children during the 2015 spring season.
     
    “Beginning at age 4, and progressing all the way through 18 years old, kids will enjoy all the fun and excitement of learning and playing ball in a safe and well-organized setting,” said Carranza.
     
    RBY has historically been limited to students within the Redlands Unified School District (Redlands, Mentone and Highland) but now things are changing.
     
    “After many requests from neighboring communities to participate in RBY’s well-respected program, this year all young people from all the surrounding communities including Loma Linda, Colton, Grand Terrace, etc.… can enjoy of all the fun, excitement and camaraderie of playing ball,” said Carranza.
     
    “RBY is sanctioned by PONY Baseball and Softball, whose “Protect Our Nation’s Youth” message is put into practice by providing experiences in youth baseball and softball that will help young people grow into healthier and happier adults,” said Carranza.
     
    Registration fees include a quality uniform jersey and cap, field preparation and maintenance, utilities, umpires and scorekeepers, insurance and other expenses – for a complete breakdown, visit RBY.org.
     
    The Redlands Baseball for Youth online registration begins Friday, October 31 and can be easily accessed through RBY.org.
     
    Early Bird registration fees, with the online discount, are $60 for Shetland 4-year-olds; $110 for Shetland ages 5-6; $120 for Pinto 7, Mustang, 7U/8U – 10U softball (ages 7-12); Bronco, Pony, softball 12U-14U $130 (ages 13-18).
     
    On-site registration will take place at the Redlands Community Field (1535 Church Street, Church and San Bernardino Avenue), near the snack bar, on Sunday, November 23; Saturday, December 6 and 13, from 10am to 1pm.
     
    Hard copy applications will be available at the registration event or can be accessed from RBY.org. Please be sure to bring a copy of each child’s birth certificate.
     
    RBY provides opportunities for special needs children with our Xtreme Team.
     
    Multiple child discounts are available. Families meeting certain requirements may apply for a limited number of scholarships or a payment plan. Information and requirements for all the aforementioned is available at RBY.org Scholarship and payment plans applicants must apply in person.
     
    Families registering online, and before December 14, 2014, can save $20 per child on their registration.
     
    RBY registration fees have been lower than other similar programs in the Inland Empire – this is made possible by revenues generated through the snack bar.
     
    “Unfortunately, a grandfathered arrangement with the County Health Department requiring significant modifications to the cooking hood, plumbing and structure is expiring. Due to the extensive costs related to these alterations, registration fees are increasing a nominal amount, making registering early and taking advantage of the discount more important than ever,” said Carranza.
     
    “We need additional support to help use serve our youth. Businesses and baseball-loving individuals interested in supporting this extremely worthwhile program and learning about the benefits provided to sponsors are encouraged to visit RBY.org for more information,” said Carranza.
     
    The Spring 2015 Season will officially start with Opening Day Celebration on February 28. Along with several games and possibly a vendor fair, a brief presentation to parents and dignitaries will conclude with the Official First Pitch being thrown out with all teams taking the field at once.
     
    Once the season starts, teams will play approximately 16 games. The tee-ballers always play on Saturday mornings starting at 9am, while everyone else plays Monday – Saturday. Weekday games start at 5pm with the last game starting no later than 7:30.
     
    All parents interested in managing, coaching, volunteering or serving on the board must complete a background check. Information regarding the application and background processes will be available at onsite registrations and at RBY.org.
     
    “The culture of Redlands Baseball (and Softball) for Youth is to create a fun learning environment while maintaining a healthy spirit of competition,” said Carranza.
     
    For more information about RBY as a player, manager, coach, volunteer, board member or sponsor, please visit RBY.org.
     

    -end-

    LaSalle Medical Associates Three Decades of Making People Healthier 

    LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc Celebrates 30 years of medical service. Left to right: Anna Canton, Human Resource Manager, Kristina Hlebo, Finance Assistant, Carl Meier, executive vice president, Dr. Albert Arteaga CEO, Alexandra Acosta, Director of Finance and Lizette Noriega, Human Resource AssistantKristina Hlebo, Finance Assistant Alexandra Acosta, Director of Finance Lizette Noriega, Human Resource Assistant

    LaSalle Medical Associates cure for Plantar Fasciitis , Inc Celebrates 30 years of medical service with the corporate management team. Left to right: Anna Canton, Human Resource Manager; Kristina Hlebo, Finance Assistant,;Carl Meier, executive vice president; Dr. Albert Arteaga CEO; Alexandra Acosta, Director of Finance and Lizette Noriega, Human Resource Assistant. Alexandra Acosta, Director of Finance and Lizette Noriega, Human Resource Assistant

    (SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.) In June of 1984, a young doctor and his wife, a nurse, opened a family medical practice called LaSalle Medical Associates in Fontana. Their goal: provide affordable health care, with dignity and respect, to all in the Inland Empire.
     
    Three decades later, Dr. Albert and Maria Arteaga have gone far beyond making their goal a reality. They are now recognized as one of the leading health care providers in the Inland Empire, if not all of California.
     
    “We have had some markers of success,” Dr. Arteaga says. “We went from two employees – my wife and I – to a fully staffed clinic. We opened more clinics. Then we started our own IPA (independent practice association) to keep up with new demands to make health care more and more efficient.”
     
    “It has always been our goal to treat as many patients as we could while giving them the best health care possible,” he said.
     
    Some, who have recognized LaSalle Medical Associates as a leader in health care, by giving them awards for their endeavors, include:

    • The federal Center for Disease Control, which recognized Dr. Arteaga as California’s first Childhood Immunization Champion. This award recognized his efforts in educating the parents of LaSalle’s pediatric patients, and the greater Inland Empire community, of the importance of childhood immunizations
    • The California Medical Association, which recognized Dr. Arteaga with its Ethnic Physician’s Leadership Award, recognizing his contributions to improving health care in the Latino community
    • The San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors Resolution Award for outstanding community efforts
    • The San Bernardino County Medical Society’s Merlin Hendrickson, M.D. Award for Outstanding Contribution to the Community. Dr. Arteaga was recognized for his efforts to provide health services to Inland Empire children.
    Maria and Dr. Albert Arteaga. The California Medical Association awarded Abert Arteaga the “Ethnic Physician’s Leadership Award,” recognizing his contributions to medical care in the Latino community.

    Maria and Dr. Albert Arteaga. The California Medical Association awarded Abert Arteaga the “Ethnic Physician’s Leadership Award,” recognizing his contributions to medical care in the Latino community.

    • Inland Empire Health Plan (IEHP), as Riverside and San Bernardino counties’ best health care provider, and for being one of the top enrollers in all of California in the state’s former Healthy Families program
    • The African American Health Initiative as a model provider in a two-year study of Black health care in San Bernardino County.
    • Hispanic Lifestyle Magazine, which recognized LaSalle Medical Associates as one of the top 15 Latino-owned businesses in the Inland Empire

     
     
    Despite all this success, it hasn’t always been an easy path for the Arteagas.
     
    “Life doesn’t always play out as you expect,” Dr. Arteaga said. “That is certainly true in my life as a health care provider. Good intentions require good management. Providing good management has been every bit as challenging as my years in medical school were more than three decades ago!”
     
    One of the biggest changes in health care took place just this year. In 2014, Covered California part of the federal Affordable Health Care Act – which Dr. Arteaga has long been a champion of – came into being.
     
    “Although Covered California does not yet mean everyone has insurance, it does mean that many patients who couldn’t afford health care before now can do so,” Dr. Arteaga said. “Health care is no longer an out-of-reach luxury for those who couldn’t afford insurance, but is a basic right for everyone
     
    Dr. Arteaga has always thought that health care is a basic right, and has operated LaSalle Medical Associates as if that were the case.
     
    Dr. Arteaga targeted his marketing to Latinos and low-income people who were underserved.  Providing high quality medical services to underserved populations were crucial to the success of LaSalle Medical Associates.  They later expanded from Fontana to San Bernardino and Hesperia. These communities have many low-income people in need of quality affordable medical services.
     
    He also is Latino, so he easily related to his Latino patients in ways they appreciated. They told friends and family about LaSalle Medical Associates, which caused his popularity in the Inland Empire’s Latino culture to swell.

    RN Maria and Dr. Albert Arteaga partners in healthcare and family Ce;berate 30 years of Making People Healthier  in California.

    RN Maria and Dr. Albert Arteaga partners in healthcare and family Ce;berate 30 years of Making People Healthier in California.

    Dr. Arteaga has always believed that his key to business success was finding a way to get paid for their services, instead of telling patients they had to figure that out on their own before seeing him. For most of LaSalle’s history, that business model meant LaSalle employees educated patients about their health care insurance options.
     
    Most patients LaSalle saw over the years qualified for either Medi-Cal or Healthy Families. The latter, which like Medi-Cal was run by the state of California, offered low to moderate-income parents who didn’t qualify for Medi-Cal a subsidy for the health care of their children from birth to age 19.

    Many uninsured families with children under 19 can get help through the Healthy Families program; help is also available to some children and adults through Medi-Cal. For those who don’t qualify for these programs, the Affordable Health Care Act of 2010 provides additional options. Photo by: Albert Ateaga

    Things have changed in the last two years. In 2013, California got a head start on the Affordable Care Act; they created Covered California and merged Healthy Families and Medi-Cal together. 

    In 2014, one of the key Covered California’s requirements is everyone must have health insurance or pay a penalty. This means, many patients applied and signed up for Covered California, Medi-Cal or other insurance first, and then choose or are assigned to LaSalle Medical Associates.
     
    Consequently, rather than informing new patients of their insurance options, LaSalle Medical Associates employees now more likely are helping the patients understand how their health insurance system works.
     
     
    Dr. Arteaga acknowledges the Covered California has brought changes some people will take a while to get accustomed to. One of these is a concept called managed care.
     
    “The structure of the Covered California means many people, both those who had some other type of insurance and those who were uninsured, are now in managed care for the first time,” he said.
    LaSalles-Medical-Asscoaites
    Managed care is called this because it requires a doctor, such as one of the physicians in LaSalle Medical Associates, to coordinate patients’ health care services. These primary care doctors have a general, family or pediatric practice, and will treat patients for many of their symptoms, but will refer the patients to specialists when more expertise is needed.
     
    Managed care has been around since the 1990s, Dr. Arteaga said, but it has become more popular. It’s usually more cost-efficient to have managed care, he explained, people choose to buy managed care for its lower premiums.
     
    Medi-Cal has used managed care for nearly two decades. Meanwhile, LaSalle Medical Associates, since the beginning, has accepted Medi-Cal when many doctors would not, and now has a reputation among those familiar with Medi-Cal for providing quality services, no matter how payment is provided.
     
    Even though there wasn’t “managed care,” as it now known when Dr. Arteaga started his practice, even back then he was in favor of patients developing close relationships with one family doctor.
     
    “Thirty years ago I wanted to see all the patients, and manage their health care. That has not changed, but I have learned that in order to do so, a physician must take a leadership role. Otherwise, many patients will seek or demand services that are redundant or not needed.”
     
     
    Dr. Arteaga sees the physician as an advocate for the patient, one who will make sure patients get the services they truly need. Sometimes, just as some patients will push for more health care than is necessary, some insurance companies will resist paying for what a doctor recommends, but that is not the intent of managed care.
     
    “I want the patient, the doctor and the insurance company to develop a positive team, Dr. Arteaga said. “There may be opposition, but that should not stop any of us in trying to make quality health care succeed.”
     
    Besides managed care and its great expansion through the Affordable Care Act, another large change in the health care industry over the last three decades has been more careful monitoring of expenses by insurance companies.
     
    Now, it is better for a medical group like LaSalle Medical Associates to band with even more doctors, so they can take advantage of economies of scale, and provide health care more cost-efficiently.
     
    This is why LaSalle Medical Associates formed an Independent Practice Association (IPA) in 1995, and has grown it to the point it now serves more than 600 medical clinics serving more than 170,000 patients each year in nine California counties.
     
    LaSalle oversees administrative functions of all these medical clinics, although they are owned and manage their patients’ health care separately.
     
    Another move to make health care more efficient, in many ways, is one that LaSalle Medical Associates only recently transitioned to. It now is keeping track of patients’ charts with electronic medical records, ridding itself of the wall full of patients’ medical records that once were a hallmark of many medical clinics.
     
    “Electronic medical records make it easier to share patients’ records among a team of doctors who treat one patient, which results in better health care” Dr. Arteaga said. “It is also easier to keep patients’ records confidential this way.”
     
    One other significant change over the last 30 years has been that most patients are more involved in their health care now than they were in 1984.
     
    “They ask more questions now. Because of the Internet, and because people talk more about health care with their friends, patients now have more information. Not all of the information out there is correct, so this means a doctor helps the patient sort the good from the bad, and develop a treatment plan that works. This is another reason why the managed care approach is necessary.”

    “As pediatricians, we strive for 100 percent immunizations of pediatric patients and, while that’s probably a utopian objective, our goal is to get as close as to that 100 percent as we can,’’ says Dr. Albert Arteaga, president and founder of LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc. . “This CDC recognition is the fruit of two to three years of intense labor on part of me and staff.”

    “As pediatricians, we strive for 100 percent immunizations of pediatric patients and, while that’s probably a utopian objective, our goal is to get as close as to that 100 percent as we can,’’ says Dr. Albert Arteaga, president and founder of LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc. . “This CDC recognition is the fruit of two to three years of intense labor on part of me and staff.”

    One thing Dr. Arteaga has learned during his three decades of medical practice is that change can be good. In fact, one thing he loves about being the CEO of LaSalle Medical Associates is that he gets to lead other health care professionals through the changes their industry faces.
     
    “I love being collegial, and helping other doctors learn,” he said. “When they resist change, it is going to be more difficult for them. They should not expect to practice medicine as it was done 30 years ago, or even 10 years ago.”

    On the first day, owner Dr. Albert Arteaga and his wife Maria then employed as his nurse and still his chief assistant saw two patients at their clinic in Fontana. Today, LaSalle Medical Associates has grown to four clinics and 120 employees, and an Independent Practice Association (IPA) serving more than 1,900 doctors.

    In the end is true LaSalle Medical Associates has spent Three Decades Making People Healthier.

    For more information about LaSalle Medical Associates, call (909) 890-0407 or go on line to LaSalleMedical.com.

     
    About LaSalle Medical Associates
    LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc., operates four clinics employing more than 120 dedicated healthcare professionals, treating children, adults, and seniors in San Bernardino County.  LaSalle’s patients are primarily served by Medi-Cal and they also accept IEHP, Molina, Blue Cross, Blue Shield, Care 1st, and Health Net and Medicare by Easy Choice Health Plan, Molina and Care1st Health Plans.   LaSalle’s clinics are located at 17577 Arrow Blvd. in Fontana, 16455 Main St. in Hesperia and1505 West 17th St. and 565 N. Mt. Vernon Ave. in San Bernardino.
     
    LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc., is also an Independent Practice Association (IPA) of independently contracted doctors, hospitals and clinics, delivering high quality patience care with more than 170,000 patient visits per year in Fresno, Kings, Los Angeles, Madera, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Joaquin and Tulare Counties.
     
    LaSalle’s IPA members in the Inland Empire include:  LaSalle Medical Associates, Banning Medical Group and San Bernardino Urological Associates.  Hospital affiliations include: Rancho Springs Medical Center, Arrowhead Regional Medical Center, Community Hospital of San Bernardino, St. Bernadine Medical Center, Mountains Community Hospital, Redland Community Hospital, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Corona Regional Medical Center, Riverside County Medical Center, Parkview Community Hospital, Kaiser Moreno Valley, Kaiser Fontana and Kaiser Riverside.
     
     
     
    -end-