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    Posts Tagged ‘San Bernardino’

    Hispanic Lifestyle Tags LaSalle Medical Associates

    Dr. Albert Arteaga, and wife Maria, receiving an award from the San Bernardino County Medical Society for outstanding contributions to the community. photo by Carl Dameron

    (Ontario, CA)  Hispanic Lifestyle recently named LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc. as a leading Latino Owned Business that has survived and thrived during the economic downturn.

    “Hispanic Lifestyle is pleased to recognize LaSalle Medical Associates as a business that not only survived the economic downturn but thrived,” said Richard Sandoval, president of Hispanic Lifestyle.

    “We are seeing the results of seven years of hard work coming to fruition,’’ says LaSalle founder and President Dr. Albert Arteaga, on his honor from Hispanic Lifestyle. “To me, as a Hispanic, this is like the Good Housekeeping seal of approval. On an emotional level, it’s like winning the battle of Cinco de Mayo, Bunker Hill and the World Cup at the last minute.”

    Since 2007, LaSalle has expanded its Independent Practice Association (IPA) of independently contracted doctors, hospitals and clinics, delivering high quality patient care to more than 170,000 residents of Fresno, Kings, Los Angeles, Madera, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Joaquin, Stanislaus and Tulare Counties.
    LaSalle’s IPA members in the Inland Empire include: LaSalle Medical Associates, Arrowhead Orthopedics, Arther Medical Group, Rancho Medical Group, Rancho Paseo Medical Group, Alessandro Medical Group, Banning Medical Group, and San Bernardino Urological Associates. Hospital affiliations include: Rancho Springs Medical Center, Arrowhead Regional Medical Center, Community Hospital of San Bernardino, St. Bernadine Medical Center, Mountains Community Hospital, Redlands Community Hospital, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Corona Regional Medical Center, Riverside County Medical Center, and Parkview Community Hospital.

    LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc., owns four clinics employing more than 120 dedicated healthcare professionals, treating about 40,000 children, adults, and seniors in San Bernardino County.

    LaSalle’s patients are primarily served by Medi-Cal and the insurance companies participating in Covered California, which is a program offering a state subsidy to middle class families for the health care coverage required by the Affordable Care Act. LaSalle also accepts private insurance policies offered by IEHP, Molina, Blue Cross, Blue Shield, compare motor trade insurance Care 1st, and Health Net and Medicare by Easy Choice Health Plan, Molina and Care1st Health Plans.

    Find a LaSalle clinic in Fontana at 17577 Arrow Blvd., in Hesperia at16455 Main St. and in San Bernardino at 1505 West 17th St. or 565 N. Mt. Vernon Ave.

    Dr. Albert Arteaga and wife Maria will be recognized for their achievements as part of
    Hispanic Lifestyle’s Business Expo and Conference luncheon on Wednesday, August 6, 2014 at the Ontario Airport Hotel in Ontario, California at 11:30 am.  The conference runs from 8:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.

    The all day conference and expo features presentations by Latino/Latinas Executives of Influence, a panel discussion on business matchmaking. The conference will be captured for distribution for Southern California PBS television stations and the Hispanic Network website.

    “The awardees were compiled from audience nominations and business profiles that have been featured on Hispanic Lifestyle,” said Richard Sandoval, producer of Hispanic Lifestyle.

    For more information call (951) 940-9099, email events@HispanicLifestyle.com or go online at http://www.hispaniclifestyle.com

    For more information on LaSalle Medical Associates call (909) 890-0407.

    About LaSalle Medical Associates
    LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc., operates four clinics employing more than 120 dedicated healthcare professionals, treating children, adults, and seniors in San Bernardino County.  LaSalle’s patients are primarily served by Medi-Cal and the insurance companies participating in Covered California, and they also accept Blue Cross, Blue Shield, Care 1st, Health Net.  LaSalle’s clinics are at 17577 Arrow Blvd. in Fontana, 16455 Main St. in Hesperia and 1505 West 17th St. and 565 N. Mt. Vernon Ave. in San Bernardino.

    LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc., is also an Independent Practice Association (IPA) of independently contracted doctors, hospitals and clinics, delivering high quality patience care with more than 170,000 patient visits per year in Fresno, Kings, Los Angeles, Madera, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Joaquin and Tulare Counties.

    LaSalle’s IPA members in the Inland Empire include:  LaSalle Medical Associates, Arrowhead Orthopedics, Arther Medical Group, Rancho Medical Group,
    Rancho Paseo Medical Group, Alessandro Medical Group Banning Medical Group, and San Bernardino Urological Associates.  Hospital affiliations include: Rancho Springs Medical Center, Arrowhead Regional Medical Center, Community Hospital of San Bernardino, St. Bernadine Medical Center, Mountains Community Hospital, Redland Community Hospital, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Corona Regional Medical Center, Riverside County Medical Center, Parkview Community Hospital.

    Great Newsletter Design and Writing Sells More …

    Dameron Communications creates newsletters for colleges, universities, doctors, medical clinics, Non-Profits, government and more.

    Dameron Communications creates newsletters for cities, counties, colleges, universities, shopping centers, developers, retailers, computer stores, doctors, medical clinics, Non-Profits, attorneys, schools ad more…

     
    (SAN BERNARDINO, CA.) “Dameron Communicators, that’s what we call the newsletter designs,” says Carl Dameron, founder and creative director of the public relations/advertising firm Dameron Communications. “These newsletters boost awareness and business for all clients who come on board.”
    “We won’t just design, write and produce printed editions,” adds Dameron, “we’ll also create a social network strategy, and post them on all the major  industry websites, create an electronic version for distribution via email and to post on client Web sites.”
    “Our clients will get the broadest possible exposure for their services, offerings and successes. Plus, what goes in the newsletters will also be sent to all media outlets in their service area.  For Inland Empire clients that’s potential exposure to 4.2 million potential customers,” said Dameron.
    “We now how to pull the good stories out of good businesses,” Dameron says, “we know how to tell it, and tell it to more people than ever before.”
    Newsletters are designed, written or produced  in full color, and are available in two-page, to 64-page formats up to 500,000 units.
    Since 1989 Dameron Communications has creatively met the needs of our diverse client base in California. It is an award-winning agency that creates integrated advertising and public relations solutions to increase clients’ sales and profits, win elections, inform the public or gain acceptance of potentially controversial issues.
    Dameron Communications creates advertising for television, radio, newspaper, magazine, and billboards, web sites, mobile web applications, email and more. Public relations services include press releases, press conferences, media relations, television programs, web sites, opinion editorials, promotions, event creation and management, government relations and community relations.
    Dameron has earned media coverage for clients from: ABC, CBS, NBC, CNBC, CBS MarketWatch; Fox News, CNN, Nightly Business Report; The Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, Dow Jones News Wire, Bloomberg, Reuters, Associated Press, The Press Enterprise, The Sun, The Daily Bulletin, The Orange County Register, The Daily News, The Daily Press and many more.
    For more information call Carl Dameron at (909) 534-9500.

     -end-

    Homeless Shelter Director Focus On Hospitality

     Homeless Shelter Director Focus On Hospitality

    Anne Metu says she is thankful to the Salvation Army for giving her a platform and encouraging her to pursue her passion for helping people. However, Metu points out that she receives assistance from many areas to make lives better for the San Bernardino underserved through in-kind donations.  Metu celebrates her third anniversary as the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps’ Hospitality House Shelter Director in June.

     
    As the director,  Metu oversees The Salvation Army and its community partners’ efforts to provide vital services for the Inland Empire’s homeless children and families. In 2014, the shelter at 925 W. Tenth Street, San Bernardino, provides three programs to those in need.
     
    “I keep the community aware of what the Salvation Army is doing,” Metu said. “We cannot help solve the problem of homelessness without community support.”
     
    Homeless families received 12,464 nights of shelter last year. Many supportive services are provided with each night of shelter including: meals, hygiene products, laundry, hot showers, tutoring and case management,” said  Metu.
     
    “The people served at The Salvation Army shelter come from all walks of life. The challenges of homelessness touch all ethnic groups and ages. We serve many single parents, families with children, and adult women without children,” said Metu.
     
    The main program offered at Hospitality House is the transitional living program. This allows families and single women for stays up 18 to 24 months while obtaining the life skills necessary for permanent, independent living. With grants from the federal program Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the Salvation Army has been able to offer this program since October 2011.
     
    Clients in the transitional living program pay up to 30 percent of their income in rent (this is adjusted based on family size) and save 20 percent to pay for the expenses of securing permanent housing, such as an apartment or a room in someone else’s home.
     
    The 925 W. Tenth Street building also houses the Salvation Army’s original homeless shelter program, an emergency shelter for single women and families. The Salvation Army has been offering this program since the shelter opened in 2010, and did so at other locations for decades before then.
     
    Families can stay up to 90 days in the shelter, provided the adults in the family are actively seeking employment. They must save 75 percent of their income so they have the means to transition to permanent housing as quickly as possible.
     
    “People, for a variety of reasons, come to the shelter with very little,” Metu said. “Many of them need more help than can be provided in 90 days, as such if they qualify, they move to our transitional living program.”
     
    Both shelter programs help the clients with other issues, including developing job skills, resolve legal issues, learn to manage a home budget, and be involved in their child’s education.
     
    Children in both programs have access to tutoring services provided by The San Bernardino County Unified School District. The transitional living program gives the families more time to resolve issues, such as if they need further education or other training to become employable.
     
    In April 2011, the shelter had up to 68 people living there. Of these, about 48 were enrolled in the transitional living program, with the rest enrolled in the emergency shelter program.
     
    The shelter also provides meals to many low-income Inland Empire residents who may not be homeless, but struggle to put food on their own tables. The Salvation Army has provides meals about 200 people on any given day in its long tradition of caring for San Bernardino area residents’ most basic needs.
     
    Providing all of these services is a staff of nine full-time and four part-time employees, which Ms. Metu oversees.
     
    Because the transitional program is financed primarily through HUD grants, there are requirements for reporting how this money is spent. This grant also has to be renewed each year, through a somewhat competitive application process.
     
    The Salvation Army also keeps the San Bernardino area appraised of all its services, primarily through the organization’s Advisory Board, but also through presentations Ms. Metu gives to other organizations in the community. She tells prospective clients what the Salvation Army has to offer.
     
    “I am usually out in the community educating people about what we do. I also pull in clients who I think fit the services we provide.”
     
    The Salvation Army is a member of the San Bernardino County Homeless Partnership Network, a coalition established by the County of San Bernardino to coordinate and improve services provided to the homeless. The coalition works with government agencies, the community and faith-based programs to help Hospitality House clients, homeless people in other shelters, and those who live on the streets.
     
    Ms. Metu came to the United States from Nigeria, settling in Houston, Texas in 1997.  She came already familiar with helping others and began her American career with the Council on Alcohol and Drugs Houston, where she worked for six years. While there, Ms. Metu decided to become a chemical dependency counselor.  She later moved to the Family Drug Treatment Court in Houston as a coordinator.
     
    “Working in Houston, I noticed a lot of families dealing with both substance abuse and homelessness,” said Metu. “Usually only one person in the family comes forward to receive help. My desire grew, wanting to help the entire family heal, not just that one person. I wanted to do whatever it takes to help them live a normal life and function in society.”
     
    Metu wanted to combine Christian counseling with her passion to battle drugs and substance abuse. She did this in Texas prior to moving to be with her family in San Bernardino in 2010, where she first became involved with the Salvation Army as a volunteer.
     
    “I heard that the Salvation Army was looking for someone to become the director of their Hospitality House,” said Metu. “The opportunity seemed perfect for me, being able to utilize my background of helping others through drug counseling, grant management and administration. I decided to apply for the job, and I got it.”
     
    Metu says she is thankful to the Salvation Army for giving her a platform and encouraging her to pursue her passion for helping people. However, Metu points out that she receives assistance from many areas to make lives better for the San Bernardino underserved through in-kind donations.
     
    “So many people have come together, providing the support we need to do what we can for others,” said Metu.
     
    She is especially grateful for the help of Ms. Brenda Dowdy, homeless education services coordinator for the San Bernardino County Superintendent of Schools.
     
    “The children receive tutoring from the San Bernardino County Unified School District,” Metu explained. “But Brenda Dowdy provides much more than that. I don’t know what we would do without her services.”
     
    Ms. Dowdy coordinates the tutors’ schedules, provides the homeless students with school supplies, and makes sure these children are able to take part in field trips and other fun outings. She also organizes monthly Resource workshops, in which organizations that can provide services to the families (such as jobs, job training, health care or even free cell phones) come to the shelter to tell the clients about what’s available to them.
     
     
    “If we have a problem with a child – for instance, or if a child doesn’t have shoes to wear to school – she will take care of that as well,” Metu said.
     
    Other organizations that help meet the needs of the Hospitality House clients include Inland Counties Legal Services, Project Home Again, the Second Harvest Food Bank, Community Action Partnership, Arrowhead United Way, the San Bernardino Women’s Club, Stater Bros Charities, San Manuel Band of Indian Missions, The Soroptimists of San Bernardino, Victory Community Outreach and medical students outreach teams from Loma Linda University.
     
    “This is really a community effort,” says Metu. “I feel privileged to be part of such a wonderful team that is dedicated to helping improve the lives of those who are less fortunate and going through a difficult time.”
     
    For more information call the San Bernardino Hospitality House at (909) 888-4880.   Donations can always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY or (909) 888-1336.
     
    About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps
    The Salvation Army may be able to provide emergency services including food; lodging for homeless or displaced families; clothing and furniture; assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) assists rescue workers and evacuees in such disasters as fires.
     
    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and also offers evangelical programs for boys, girls and adults. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY or (909) 888-1336.
     
    -end-
     
    Photo Caption:  Anne Metu says she is thankful to the Salvation Army for giving her a platform and encouraging her to pursue her passion for helping people. However, Metu points out that she receives assistance from many areas to make lives better for the San Bernardino underserved through in-kind donations.  Metu celebrates her third anniversary as the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps’ Hospitality House Shelter Director in June.
     
    Dameron Communications

    CarlD@DameronCommunications.com

    DameronCommunications.com

    (909) 534-9500

    San Bernardino’s Last Redevelopment Project Opens To Good Reviews

    (Left to Right) Anthony Sandoval, Western Senior Housing President; Heather Rouhana, Representative from Congressmember Gary Miller; Aaron Mandel, Western Senior Housing Vice President and Graham Espley-Jones, Western Community Housing President

    Dignitaries presented the new Magnolia at 9th Street Senior Apartments with certificates of Achievements. (Left to Right) Anthony Sandoval, Western Senior Housing President; Heather Rouhana, Representative from Congressmember Gary Miller; Aaron Mandel, Western Senior Housing Vice President and Graham Espley-Jones, Western Community Housing President

     
    (San Bernardino, CA)  The City of San Bernardino, Western Community Housing, Inc. and Meta Housing, Corp. recently held the grand opening for Magnolia at 9th a 119-unit affordable, luxury, senior housing community now open for seniors.
     
    “This is a great example of what private public partnerships can accomplish,” said San Bernardino Mayor Carey Davis. “It will be a great place for seniors. They will have a wonderful opportunity to improve their lifestyle.”
     
    The Magnolia at 9th Senior Apartments is located in San Bernardino at 181 9th Street near the corner of 9th and Lugo Street. It has been open since January, providing seniors age 62 and older with an upscale but affordable living option.  The apartments include 100 one-bedroom units, and 19 two bedrooms.
     
    The project started out as a partnership between the San Bernardino Redevelopment Agency, Meta Housing, and Western Community Housing. With $7.1 million in redevelopment funding that would allow it to transform a formerly blighted 40-year-old apartment complex into an attractive, safe and modern living place, Meta Housing and Western Community Housing began planning this project in 2009.
     
    Prior to Magnolia at 9th Street, the city had used redevelopment funds to bring about renewal to many other blighted houses and apartments in many other neighborhoods.
     
    In February of 2012 as The Magnolia at 9th was assembling additional funding, state legislation eliminated redevelopment agencies. The City of San Bernardino had to convince the State of California that because Magnolia at 9th was already in progress, the redevelopment funds committed to this project should stay in San Bernardino.
     
    First Ward Council Member Virginia Marquez is a supporter of and advocate for Magnolia at 9th since its beginning.
     
    Support from the project came from San Bernardino City officials including Councilmember Marquez and Mayr Davis. (Left to Right) Mayor Carey Davis, San Bernardino City Mayor; Virgina Marqez, 15th Ward City Counsel Member of San Bernardino and Graham Espley-Jones, Western Community Housing President.

    Support from the project came from San Bernardino City officials including Councilmember Marquez and Mayor Davis. (Left to Right) Mayor Carey Davis, San Bernardino City Mayor; Virginia Marquez, 15th Ward City Counsel Member of San Bernardino and Graham Espley-Jones, Western Community Housing President.

    “Partnerships such as the one the city had with Meta Housing are critical for keeping our city an attractive place to live,” Council Member Marquez said. “This project was very near and dear to me, because it was the last one before the redevelopment agency folded up. It was very touch-and-go for a while, but we persevered and now have this wonderful place for our seniors to live.”
     
    As a leader in the senior housing industry, Western Seniors Housing, Inc., which manages Magnolia at 9th, is committed to raising the level of quality senior housing in the industry through thoughtful management programs geared toward maintaining a high level of satisfaction for the owners, operators and residents of senior apartment communities.
     
    “We are thrilled to be able to offer beautiful, quality, affordable housing designed for seniors age 62+, with many amenities,” said Anthony Sandoval, President of Western Seniors Housing, about the comforts and tranquil living conditions that the community has to offer.
    The Magnolia at 9th Senior Apartments boasts a brand new 2,500 square foot community room where residents may enjoy relaxation and companionship amongst themselves or their guests.
     
    Judi Penman, President and Chief Executive Officer at San Bernardino Chamber of Commerce leads the Ribbon Cutting.

    Judi Penman, President and Chief Executive Officer at San Bernardino Chamber of Commerce leads Mayor Davis, Councilmember Marquez and Aaron Mandel from developer Meta Housing Corp and community members in the Magnolia at 9th Street Senior Housing Official Ribbon Cutting.

    “The completion of this project also helps the City of San Bernardino deliver more quality affordable senior housing units. San Bernardino is approximately 1,000 units short and these 119 units help meet that state requirement,” said former Mayor Patrick Morris.
     
    The $21 million project also comes with exceptional programs for seniors and a sustainable design using “green building” principles designed to exceed existing energy efficiency by more than one-third. The City of San Bernardino is a partner in the project contributing $7.1 million in redevelopment housing funds.
    (Left to Right) Virgina Marqez, 15th Ward City Counsel Member of San Bernardino and Anthony Sandoval, Western Senior Housing President discuss the apartments beauty in the court yard.

    (Left to Right) Virgina Marquez, 15th Ward City Counsel Member of San Bernardino and Anthony Sandoval, Western Senior Housing President discuss the apartments beauty in the court yard.

     
    “We also partner with an organization like EngAGE, to provide programs for seniors that help them maintain a healthier and happier lifestyle. Providing seniors with opportunities to stay connected and active is essential,” said Meta Housing Corp. Vice President Aaron Mandel.
     
    For example, in the computer center, seniors who have never used a computer before learn how to keep in-touch and interact with their children and grandkids.
     
    “We are thrilled to be able to deliver this beautiful senior housing project to San Bernardino,” said Mandel. “About 38 seniors have moved is and are enjoying their apartments.  Rents range from $494 to $807 a month depending on income and availability.”
     
    “Overall, above and beyond the technology, amenities and structure itself, seniors will find a great place they can come to call home and their families can rest assured that their parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles are enjoying their senior years in comfort and good company,” said Mandel.
     
    “We are very excited to bring another great senior apartment community to San Bernardino and the region,” said Mandel. “We look forward to delivering more quality, affordable multi-family housing projects in partnerships with the county and cities in the next few years.”
     
    (Left to Right) Judi Penman, President and Chief Executive Officer at San Bernardino Chamber of Commerce and Rikke Van Johnson, 6th Ward City Counsel Member of San Bernardino.

    (Left to Right) Judi Penman, President and Chief Executive Officer at San Bernardino Chamber of Commerce and Rikke Van Johnson, 6th Ward City Counsel Member of San Bernardino.

    The developer for this project is Meta Housing Corporation and Western Community Housing Corporation. The general contractor is Optimus Construction and the architect is Ken Stockton. Western Seniors Housing provides property management and EngAge delivers senior programs.
     
    For more information or to reserve a spot call the Magnolia at 9th Street Senior Apartments at (909) 388.1203.
     

    -end-

     
     

    Carl Dameron interviewed on KVCR 91.9

    Carl  M. Dameron Founder and Creative Director of Dameron Communications.

    Carl M. Dameron Founder and Creative Director of Dameron Communications interviewed on KVCR.

    Dameron Communications
    Published On : 2/19/2014
    By : Ken Vincent
    From : KVCR
    Categories : Local, Business
    KVCR commemorates African-American history month by hearing about the history of trying to get nonprofit government and other small groups with small budgets to realize the importance of public relations. KVCR’s Ken Vincent talks with San Bernardino PR pro, Carl M. Dameron.
    Listen to Podcast
    http://kvcr.org/News/Stories/2014/February/0219_Dameron_Communications

    Builder Tim Garcia Supervises Building of Quality Habitat For Humanity Homes

    At the Hesperia House ribbon cutting in October of this year Habitat for Humanity ReStore Manager Jon Biggs with Hesperia City Council Member Russell "Russ" Blewett and Tim Garcia Habitat for Humanity construction manager

    At the Hesperia House ribbon cutting in October of this year Habitat for Humanity ReStore Manager Jon Biggs with Hesperia City Council Member Russell “Russ” Blewett and Tim Garcia Habitat for Humanity construction manager

     

     (Redlands, CA)  Once upon a time, if a family wanted to build a home, everyone in the community would welcome its new neighbors by pitching in and helping. The home would quickly rise up from the ground, and the grateful new residents of this community would show their gratitude by becoming productive citizens who, in turn, helped other neighbors.

     
    Today, an organization called Habitat for Humanity provides that same kind of help; by organizing community volunteers to help deserving low-income families who as an example make up to $50,950 a year for a family of four build their first home.
     
    It isn’t quite as simple though as it was “once upon a time.” For one thing, in the 21st Century, there are a myriad of law governing how people build houses, and there are permits that must be obtained from several local government agencies. It also takes a great deal of skill and knowledge to put together the type of home in which a modern family would feel comfortable.
     
    To make all of that happen a professional construction manager is essential. At Habitat for Humanity, San Bernardino Area, this construction manager is licensed general contractor Tim Garcia.
     
    “Tim is a professional contractor who is dedicated to his work,” said Dennis Baxter, executive director of the Habitat for Humanity of San Bernardino. “And he is a man who does many good things for his community.”
     
    Garcia has had a relationship with Habitat for Humanity of San Bernardino almost since it began.  This connection started at the First Presbyterian Church of San Bernardino, where Garcia and Habitat for Humanity of San Bernardino chapter founder, San Bernardino Mayor Patrick Morris, both attend.
     
    Mayor Morris started the local Habitat chapter in 1992 after working with one of the international organization’s most famous volunteers, former United States President Jimmy Carter.  At the beginning, the Mayor’s church got on board by sending teams of volunteers to Habitat for Humanity’s building projects.
     
    Two years later, Garcia signed up for one of those teams, and thoroughly enjoyed this service. Not only did he volunteer many times after that, he also served as a member of the Board of Directors from 1999-2001 and as resident from 2001–2002.
     
    He enjoyed his contributions to Habitat for Humanity hence since 2004; Garcia has been a part-time employee of Habitat for Humanity, serving as its construction manager.
     
    “That meant they started paying me for the things I was already doing,” Garcia said. “It is my job to train and supervise all the volunteers, which I had been doing as a volunteer.”
     

    Tim Garcia Habitat for Humanity construction manager

    Tim Garcia Habitat for Humanity construction manager

    Garcia also has a full-time job managing his own business, Inland Construction, which provides remodeling and building services to the general public. He has been a licensed general contractor since 2003, and worked in construction for a decade before.
     
    Habitat for Humanity has thousands of chapters throughout the world, including 15 in southern California. The San Bernardino chapter, established in 1992 by current San Bernardino Mayor Patrick Morris, serves most of San Bernardino County. Its territory extends from Fontana to Yucaipa, and north to the desert and Victor Valley areas.
     
    Garcia is a long time resident of San Bernardino and the son of community leaders and philanthropists Ernie and Dottie Garcia.
     
    All Habitat for Humanity organizations acquire either vacant land or dilapidated homes. From these, Habitat creates quality homes, and provides financial assistance to carefully selected families who will receive these homes when they are complete.  The families contribution includes 500 hours of sweat equity in the Habitat for Humanity projects, pay zero interest and pay monthly mortgages of about $500 to $700 a month.
     
    The adults in these families work with Habitat for Humanity staff and community volunteers to construct the homes, although the projects are managed and supervised by licensed general contractors.  Since it has volunteer labor, and often uses donated supplies, it constructs homes for less cost than typical construction.
     
    The San Bernardino chapter serves San Bernardino County communities between Fontana and Yucaipa, as well as the Mountain Communities of Running Springs, Lake Arrowhead, and Crestline, and the Upper Desert towns of Hesperia, Apple Valley and Victorville.
     
    Habitat for Humanity has plans to build seven homes in San Bernardino and Grand Terrace for families that as an example make up to $50,950 for a family of four.
     
    To donate, volunteer or for more information, go online to www.habitatsb.org, or call Habitat for Humanity at (909) 478-1176.
     
    About Habitat for Humanity San Bernardino Area, Inc.
    Habitat for Humanity San Bernardino Area is the local affiliate of Habitat for Humanity International, a faith-based nonprofit organization that works in partnership with families to strengthen communities and transform lives by building new homes, rehabilitating existing homes, and making affordable home ownership a reality for community members in need.
     
    Habitat for Humanity San Bernardino Area serves San Bernardino County communities between Fontana and Yucaipa, as well as the Mountain Communities of Running Springs, Lake Arrowhead, and Crestline, and the Upper Desert towns of Hesperia, Apple Valley and Victorville.
     
    The Habitat for Humanity ReStore is a deep discounted home improvement store that sells building materials, appliances, home accessories, and furniture.  The ReStore accepts donated goods, which are sold to the general public at a fraction of the retail price.  All proceeds are used to fund the administration and rehabilitation or construction of Habitat for Humanity homes.
     
    To find out more about Habitat for Humanity, call 909-478-1176 or visit www.HabitatSB.org.  We also ask you to LIKE us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/SBReStore.
     

    -end-

    Help The Salvation Army Bring The Joy Of Christmas To A Child

    The faculty and staff at the Loma Linda School of Allied Health Professions were happy to be able to help with the Giving Tree program.  Together they donated more than 100 toys filling the wishes of children in Rialto, Highland, Grand Terrace, Colton, and San Bernardino.  To the left of the presents is Debbie Becker and me Kathy Poss.  To the right is Shirley Sing (kneeling) and Dana McCree.  (photo by Loma Linda School of Allied Health)

    Last year the faculty and staff at the Loma Linda School of Allied Health Professions were happy to be able to help with the Giving Tree program. Together they donated more than 100 toys filling the wishes of children in Rialto, Highland, Grand Terrace, Colton, and San Bernardino. To the left of the presents is Debbie Becker and me Kathy Poss. To the right is Shirley Sing (kneeling) and Dana McCree. (photo by Loma Linda School of Allied Health)

     

    The Salvation Army has helped the needy in San Bernardino since 1887

     
    (SAN BERNARDINO, Calf.) It might seem like a very small gesture in the grand scheme of things, but when the local Salvation Army Corps (www.salvationarmyusa.org), local residents and several businesses join forces to make the holiday season memorable for needy children, it makes a huge difference in so many lives.
     
    The Giving Tree, as a portion of this holiday program is known, revolves around actual Christmas trees, which are set up in local malls the day after Thanksgiving. Giving Tree volunteers match shoppers with the hundreds of children who are relying on The Salvation Army this year to bring them a Merry Christmas.
     
    One of these trees is at Inland Center Mall in San Bernardino. It will help the San Bernardino Citadel Corps provide toys to perhaps hundreds of children in San Bernardino, Highland, Grand Terrace, Colton and Bloomington.
     
    “You can support our Giving Tree by visiting our table in the Inland Center Mall from November 29th to December 24th,” said Major Daniel Henderson, Corps officer for the San Bernardino Salvation Army. “Just pick up a Giving Tree tag and buy a gift corresponding to the tag!
     
    Last year, José Gonzalez was a first time volunteer with The Salvation Army, and chose to help the Giving Tree Program at the Inland Center Mall. “It feels good to be volunteering and collecting toys for kids this Christmas,” said Gonzalez. Gonzalez is also a graduate from The Salvation Army’s six month rehabilitation program, and will soon graduate from its Path To Prosperity transitional living program.
     
    This 18 month program is one of a kind, and assists its participants in obtaining the skills they need to become self-supporting and financially independent after overcoming substance abuse. “The Salvation Army has helped me get my life together,” said Gonzalez.
     
    Shoppers wishing to participate in the Giving Tree will find cards attached to the Giving Tree. These cards include the names and wish lists of needy children whose families cannot afford to buy gifts. Shoppers simply pluck a tag off the Giving Tree and head for the appropriate store to purchase their gift donations. Shoppers keep the card as an ornament to hang on their own Christmas tree, reminding them of their good deed.
     
    Larry Rangal, of Highland, donated two toys to the Giving Tree Program last year. Charity has been an ongoing tradition for Rangal since marrying his wife more than 20 years ago.
     
    “This is one of our little quirks. Now that our kids are grown-up and out of the house, we thought we’d provide toys for other children,” said Rangal. “It makes you feel good too.”
     
    Jill Grace, of Highland, was shopping with 3-year-old Allie Chavez when she noticed the Giving Tree and decided to donate two large bags with about 10 toys. “These children are not asking for much,” said Grace. “What child asks for Monopoly, especially nowadays.”
     
    Grace became involved with The Salvation Army more than a decade ago, during the September 11th tragedy. “I have always been a giving person, and I thought to myself ‘how can I help’,” said Grace. By volunteering with The Salvation Army, Grace was able to provide that help. “Me and my husband helped The Salvation Army serve meals to the workers at Ground Zero,” said Grace.
     
    “This is a great way to start a tradition with your own family, by selecting a gift for a needy child together. The gifts are based on their individual wishes and for some children, it may be the only gift they receive all year,” said Capt. Daniel Henderson of the San Bernardino Corps of The Salvation Army.
     
    “Soccer balls, dolls and clothes are just a few items on each child’s wish list,” said Capt. Henderson. “Shoppers who participate in the program are encouraged to shop for more than what is needed on the list. I can’t think of a better way for business owners and managers to help the community and spread the spirit of Christmas.”
     
    The Salvation Army is looking for other business owners and managers who would like to have a tree at their place of business for employees and/or customers.
     
    To host a Giving Tree in San Bernardino, Colton, Grand Terrace, Rialto, Bloomington or Highland, call (909) 888-1336.
     
    The Riverside Salvation Army has an Angel Program to collect toys for needy kids this Christmas. Toys are collected at The Riverside Salvation Army office located at 3695 1st St., Riverside, CA 92501. To make a donation please call (951) 784-4490, Ext. 100.
     
    The Redlands Salvation Army has Angel Tree tags with the names and wish lists of needy children. Pick-up a tag at The Redlands Salvation Army located at 838 Alta St., Redlands, CA 92374. For more information call, (909) 792-6868.
     
    The Moreno Valley Salvation Army collects toy donations through its Angel Tree program. The Angel Tree is located at the Moreno Valley Mall, 22500 Town Circle Suite 1206, Moreno Valley, CA 92553. Toys are collected until December 22nd, Monday through Friday from 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m., and all day on Saturday. For more information call (951) 653-9131.
     
    The Victor Valley Salvation Army collects toy donations at its office located at 14585 La Paz Drive, Victorville, CA 92395. To make a donation please call (760) 245-2545.
     
    The Ontario Salvation Army collects toys at its office located at 1412 South Euclid Ave., Ontario, CA 91762. To make a donation please call (909) 986-6748.
     
    About The Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps
    The Salvation Army may be able to provide emergency services including food; lodging for homeless or displaced families; clothing and furniture; assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) assists rescue workers and evacuees in such disasters as fires.
     
    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the universal Christian Church, and also offering holistic programs for people of all ages. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. The San Bernardino Corps of The Salvation Army serves Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto, and San Bernardino. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY. Our local number is (909) 888-1336.
     

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    Keep The Bells Ringing This Holiday Season

    Salvation Army Board member Carl Dameron rings the bells with his family.  Left to right: Malaika, Carl and Shaila.  Photo by Ricard Tomboc

    Salvation Army Board member Carl Dameron rings the bells with his family. Left to right: Malaika, Carl and Shaila. Salvation Army board members ring the bells every year to support the Salvation Army’s mission.  Photo by Ricard Tomboc

    (SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.) The “miracle” of Christmas is repeated over and over again through the joy of caring and sharing. The San Bernardino Salvation Army (www.salvationarmyusa.org) is seeking volunteers to ring bells in Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto, and San Bernardino.
     
    The nationally recognized shiny red kettle is an integral part of the Christmas scene, with millions of dollars donated each year to aid needy families, seniors, and the homeless, in keeping with the spirit of the season.
     
    “This is a wonderful way to help disadvantaged people in our community, simply by volunteering as bell ringers,” said Major Stephen Ball, commander of The Salvation Army of San Bernardino. “We’re looking for individuals, families and groups to spend a day at one of our more than 30 locations in the San Bernardino area.”
     
    The Salvation Army began ringing its bells this year on Friday, Nov. 16th and continues from 10 a.m. through 6 p.m., Monday through Saturday until Christmas Eve.
     
    Anyone who would like to donate a few hours of his or her time can volunteer.  However, a parent or guardian must accompany individuals under the age of 16. Most volunteers ring two hours at a time, but groups are asked to provide ringers who can work in shifts for an entire day.
     
    “The more people who volunteer, the fewer people the agency must hire,” said Major Ball “For each volunteer bell ringer we have, it means more money raised in direct support of our services to those families in need.”
     
    This year, the Sierra del Mar Divisional Headquarters of the Salvation Army has already helped its San Bernardino chapter with a “bell-ringing marathon.” Major Butch Soriano, the divisional finance secretary, came to the Colton Wal-Mart on Tuesday, Dec. 3. From 9 a.m. that day until 6 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 7, he rang the bell for 105 hours straight, raising a total of $2,696.42 for the San Bernardino Corps.
     
    Salvation Army Major Butch Soriano just set a new world record for the longest continuous hand bell-ringing by an individual but fell $7,000 short of his $10,000 goal.

    Salvation Army Major Butch Soriano just set a new world record for the longest continuous hand bell-ringing by an individual but fell $7,000 short of his $10,000 goal.

    The Salvation Army was holding a competition amongst its officers and members to see who could ring the bell the longest. Major Soriano ended his service in a three-way tie for first place, along with another Salvation Army officer in Minnesota and a member in Texas.
     
    Major Soriano not only braved the cooler temperatures and on the final day, rain to serve his division. He also began his service by driving more than 100 miles from his office in San Diego to the San Bernardino Corps headquarters.
     
    The divisional officer said he did it to bring attention to a Salvation Army location that’s doing great things that may not be as highly noticed as what corps in larger cities do.
     
    “There tends to be a lot of focus on the metropolitan areas like San Diego and Los Angeles,” Major Soriano said. “But I know San Bernardino does a lot of great things, so I wanted to bring the public awareness of them.”
     
    Where does the money raised by Major Soriano and the hundreds of others ringing bells in San Bernardino go? For Christmas, the Salvation Army creates holiday food baskets for more than 600 local families. On Christmas Day, The Salvation Army of San Bernardino hosts a Christmas Dinner that historically provides a beautiful meal to 300 people. Donations raised by bell ringers help make this possible.
     
    “The San Bernardino Corps also needs food every day for those at its Hospitality House transitional shelter,” said Major Ball.  Up to 75 family members stay in its transitional and emergency family shelters.
     
    The Salvation Army also needs food daily for up to 200 people who receive a free dinner served six nights a week. Approximately 40,000 meals are served annually from the Army’s kitchen located at 746 W. 5th Street in San Bernardino.
     
    Feeding the hungry is just one of the ways money donated to The Salvation Army helps. The Salvation Army also helps provide emergency services including food; lodging for homeless or displaced families; clothing and furniture; assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) assists rescue workers and evacuees in such disasters as fires.
     
    To volunteer as a bell ringer in Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto, and San Bernardino, call The Salvation Army at (909) 888-1336.
     
    In addition, one may donate to The Salvation Army online, through the website www.salvationarmyusa.org. Donors may specify to which branch of The Salvation Army the money should be sent.
     
    How the Bell Ringer campaign began:
    Captain Joseph McFee, serving with the San Francisco Salvation Army Corps in 1891, wanted to serve Christmas dinner to the poor in his neighborhood. But he didn’t have money to do so.
     
    As a sailor in Liverpool, England, Captain Mcfee saw people on the docks throw money into a large kettle called “Simpson’s Pot” to help the poor. He decided this might work in California too.
     
    Captain Mcfee set up a kettle at the Oakland Ferry Landing, which operated a ferry that was, in those days, the only way across San Francisco Bay. He put a sign on the kettle saying, “Keep the Pot Boiling” and raised enough money to serve the Christmas dinner.
     
    His idea spread quickly, and by 1897 Salvation Army Corps nationwide were collecting money in kettles to serve the needy in their communities. Among the Salvation Army Corps collecting money this way before the turn of the Twentieth Century was The Salvation Army of San Bernardino, which formed in 1887.
     
    About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps
    The Salvation Army may be able to provide emergency services including food; lodging for homeless or displaced families; clothing and furniture; assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) assists rescue workers and evacuees in such disasters as fires.
     
    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and also offers holistic programs for individuals of all. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. The San Bernardino Corps of The Salvation Army serves Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto, and San Bernardino. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY. Our local number is (909) 888-1336.
    For more info, check www.abovegroundfun.com.
     

    LaSalle Adds Fresno To Medicare Coverage In Central Valley

    LaSalles-Medical-Asscoaites

    (Fresno, CA)  LaSalle Medical Associates Inc. grows in the Central Valley announcing a new contract with Care 1st to serve as its Medicare healthcare provider in Fresno County.
     
    LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc. is an Independent Practice Association (IPA) of independently contracted doctors, hospitals and clinics, delivering high quality patient care to approximately 150,000 people in Fresno, Kings, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, Madera, Tulare, Los Angeles, Riverside, and San Bernardino Counties.
     
    “Care 1st has tapped in to LaSalle’s long standing service presence in the Central Valley to help them serve Medicare patients.  LaSalle is already delivering a full range of medical insurance products including and Medicare in a number of other counties in California,” said Carl Maier, executive vice president of LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc.
     
    LaSalle Medical Associates is one of the largest independent minority owned healthcare companies in California. LaSalle also accepts Anthem Blue Cross, Molina, Care 1st, Health Net and Inland Empire Health Plan (IEHP) in 9 California counties.
     
    “Many people think of LaSalle as a medical provider for children’s services.  They are very surprised to know we deliver services to children, adults, seniors and people with disabilities.  Many of the people we serve today already have Medicare or will get Medicare shortly because of their disabilities,” said Maier.
     
    “LaSalle currently serves Medi-Cal and Medicare patients in the Central Valley, we are in active negotiations to bring more products to counties we serve,” said Maier
     
    “I am honored to have more Doctors to help serve the thousands of patients who have placed their trust in our network of primary physicians and healthcare professionals in California,” said Dr. Albert Arteaga founder and Chief Executive officer of LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc.
     
    LaSalle plans to continue to grow and serve low-income people and welcomes the new Affordable Health Care Act some times called Obama Care.
     
    “As a large provider of service to government sponsored health care programs we understand what the state’s implementation of the Affordable Health Care Act and expansion of Medi-Cal means here in California.  A lot of uninsured people with a high demand for service are going to be coming to doctors, clinics and hospitals in 2014,” said Dr. Arteaga.
     
    “Our mission continues and LaSalle is preparing to welcome 1 million new low-income patients in the nine counties we serve.  We are recruiting more health care professionals to increase our ability to provide more health care to more patients.  Why?  Everyone deserves high quality health care delivered with dignity and respect regardless of ethnicity or income,” said Dr. Arteaga.
     
    For more information about LaSalle Medical Associates, call (909) 890-0407 or go on line to LaSalleMedical.com.
     

    -end-

    New Salvation Army Leaders Join the Local Core

     

    Major Dan and Captain Anya Henderson

    The Salvation Army Corps of San Bernardino recently welcomed new corps officers, Major Daniel and Captain Anya Henderson.

    (San Bernardino, CA)  The Salvation Army Corps of San Bernardino recently welcomed new corps officers, Major Daniel and Captain Anya Henderson. The couple previously served the Salvation Army in Estonia, a nation that once was part of the Soviet Union.
     
    “We believe that the best days of the communities that we serve are just ahead of us, and that working together, we will usher in the bright future that we have longed to see!  Don’t miss out on this opportunity to stand together for the good of our community.  I will be looking forward to meeting you,” said Major Dan Henderson.
    Anya was born in St. Petersburg, Russia. At that time, her city was known as Leningrad, and country was known as the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR).
     
    In the early 1990s the Soviet Union dissolved.  Leningrad, which had been named for the first Soviet leader, Vladimir Lenin, took its original name of St. Petersburg and most of the Soviet nation, the Russian Socialist Republic, reverted to its original name, Russia. There are also more than a dozen smaller nations that gained their freedom from what was the Soviet Union.  The Hendersons have served with The Salvation Army in several of these former Soviet Republics.
     
    The Soviet Union had banned most churches from the country, but the Russian government was more receptive. In 1992, it allowed the Salvation Army to return to the Russian Federation.
    Anya Henderson was one of the first soldiers to serve in the new Russian Salvation Army.  She served as a youth worker, administrative aid, corps program assistant and translator (Russian to English).
     
    Anya graduated from the St. Petersburg University Herzen State College of Education with a bachelor’s degree in Early Childhood Education (English Language Emphasis) in 1999.  By then she had met and become engaged to Daniel Henderson.
     
    Daniel Henderson is a southern Californian. He graduated in 1989 from Madison High School in San Diego, as a National Merit Scholar, and earned Regent’s Scholarship to the University of California, San Diego. In 1993, Daniel graduated from the University with a bachelor’s of science in biochemistry and cell biology.
     
    From 1993-1994, Daniel Henderson served in the former Soviet republic of Georgia as the Salvation Army’s humanitarian aid coordinator for Western Georgia.  During that time, he oversaw the distribution of over 4,000 metric tons of USDA food aid to over 100,000 people, during the instability at the end of the Georgian civil war.
     
    Daniel then returned to southern California, and in 1996 completed the two-year Salvation Army Officer’s Training at the College For Officers Training in Rancho Palos Verdes. Upon graduation and commissioning as an Officer, Daniel was appointed to lead the Petrodvorets Corps in the outskirts of St. Petersburg.  He served in that Corps on missionary service for one year, then returned to the USA to take up appointment at the Cathedral City Corps.  He then served for one year at the Santee Corps, before being moved to the College For Officer Training as a Training Officer.
     
    In 2001 Anya completed the course of Salvation Army Officer’s Training at the College For Officers Training in Rancho Palos Verdes, CA.  While she completed her two-year training, she and Daniel were married in March of 2000.
     
    The couple then served together in Cheyenne, Wyoming from 2001-2002 and Narva, Estonia from 2002-2009.
     
    Captain Anya served as the Corps Officer of the Tallinn Kopli Corps from 2009 until coming to San Bernardino. During their time in Tallin, which is the capital of Estonia, Major Daniel served as the Regional Commander for all Salvation Army units in Estonia.
     
    Anya is an accomplished writer and speaker in both Russian and English, and routinely translates speech and written material into both languages.  Daniel has spoken and given lectures in Scotland, Norway, Finland, Estonia, Russia, and the United States.
     
    The couple has six 6 children, ranging in age from 16 years to 16 months.
     
    For more information on the Salvation Army or services they provide please call (909) 888-1336.
     
    About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps
    The Salvation Army may be able to provide emergency services including food; lodging for homeless or displaced families; clothing and furniture; assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) assists rescue workers and evacuees in such disasters as fires.
     
    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and also offers evangelical programs for boys, girls and adults. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. The San Bernardino Corps of The Salvation Army serves Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto, and San Bernardino. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY.  Our local number is (909) 888-1336.
     

    -end-