×
  • Categories
  • Click For Articles

    Posts Tagged ‘Carl Dameron’

    “Unifying Communities One Family at a Time.”

    (Photo caption) FIATM Founder and CEO, Kuba Brown, Secretary, Wayne Brown, Donna B. Layne, and COO, David Jordan Layne, cut the cake at their recent Galleria at Tyler’s Grand Opening in Riverside.  The founder credited their parents with instilling in them a dedication to support and inspire family and community.

    The nonprofit Family Is All That Matters celebrate their Grand Opening Aug. 21, 2018 at the Galleria at Tyler Mall. Board members, County Officials, mentors and mentees in the program, partners, and many others were present for the celebration. The nonprofit provides academic tutoring support, mentoring and an athletic outlet for children 5 to 18 years old. They focus on integrating academics, athletics and individual empowerment.

     

    (Riverside, Calif.) – Nothing can stop the nonprofit group FIATM from achieving its goal of “Unifying Communities – One Family at a Time.”

    FIATM, which stands for “Family is all that Matters,” has already survived a crisis that would have forced many charitable organizations to close their doors.

    A late-night fire destroyed the group’s Moreno Valley headquarters on Jan. 1, 2021.

    FIATM just put in a computer lab and adjusted its programs to be Covid compliant when the New Year’s fire destroyed their facility and shut down 13 other neighboring businesses.

    Despite that setback, FIATM founder and Chief Executive Officer, Kuba Brown, its Chief Operation Officer, David J. Layne, along with the rest of the group’s board members, staff, volunteers and their community partners, never stopped helping needy families with food, utilities and rental assistance.

     

    FIATM COO, David Jordan Layne, Riverside County Second District Supervisor, Karen Spiegel, and FIATM Founder and CEO, Kuba Brown, held its Grand Opening at The Galleria at Tyler recently.

     FIATM COO, David Jordan Layne, Riverside County Second District Supervisor, Karen Spiegel, and FIATM Founder and CEO, Kuba Brown, held its Grand Opening at The Galleria at Tyler recently.

    The group continued offering educational and tutoring programs for students from 5 to 18 year olds, and its organizers and youth sports coaches continued working with at promise youths and their families throughout Southern California.

    In fact, the challenge may have made the Inland Empire organization stronger than ever.

    FIATM recently held an Grand Opening and open house at its spacious new headquarters inside Tyler in Riverside.

    The 3,400-square-foot office has enough room for a computer lab, reading lab, homework station where youths can check out Chromebooks, a screening area for thought-provoking family movies, and displays focusing on science, technology, engineering, the arts and math.

    The nonprofit group currently serves about 850 youths, ages five to 18. About 600 are from Moreno Valley, and the others come from San Bernardino, Orange and Los Angeles counties.

    FIATM also has helped feed and assist veterans at the U.S. Vets transitional housing at March Air Reserve Base in Moreno Valley with its partner So Call Family Support Services.

    FIATM was created in 2005 “to aid at-risk-youth, teen mothers, and families in making positive choices to ensure a better quality of life.”

    Anyone who gets a chance to talk with Layne and Kuba Brown, the group’s CEO, quickly learns that the statement reflects a lifelong commitment and passion to help struggling youths, their families, and the communities where they live.

    “Everything starts with families. Everything starts with youths,” said Layne, who is also FIATM’s chief operating officer. “We refuse to be compromised or diverted from our mission of taking care of families.”

    Kuba Brown nodded in agreement.

    “We work to create safe places for at-promise kids. You never know what someone is going through at home or what help their families may need until you can sit down, listen and talk with them,” Kuba Brown said.

    The new Galleria at Tyler headquarters is a place youths will be able to come in and speak their minds, he said.

    It will be open Monday through Friday, but Layne and Brown said it’s not a walk-in office. Youths and their parents will need to schedule their visits.

    “FIATM reflects the passion that we have regarding service,” Brown said. “We want to create a place with unrivaled service, a place where we can do our very best, because in our hearts, we’re servants.”

    The F.I.A.T.M. Group Inc., is an IRS designated 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization.

    For more information about FIATM and the work the group is doing, visit their website www.FIATMGroupInc.org or call (951) 570-5053.

    -end-

     

    FIATM Grand Opening at the Galleria at Tyler in front of the second story entrance right in front of the old Nordstrom’s department store.  Left to right, front row, David Thurman, Executive Board Member, Monica Hunter, Executive Vice Chair, President of Advisory Board, Yundra Thomas .  Back Row: Donnell P. Layne, CIO and Executive Board Member, Carl M. Dameron, president of Dameron Communications FIATM’s public relations agency, Wayne Brown, Executive Board Member Kuba Brown, CEO, and David, Jordan Layne, COO.

    FIATM Grand Opening at the Galleria at Tyler in front of the second story entrance right in front of the old Nordstrom’s department store.  Left to right, front row, David Thurman, Executive Board Member, Monica Hunter, Executive Vice Chair, President of Advisory Board, Yundra Thomas .  Back Row: Donnell P. Layne, CIO and Executive Board Member, Carl M. Dameron, president of Dameron Communications FIATM’s public relations agency, Wayne Brown, Executive Board Member Kuba Brown, CEO, and David, Jordan Layne, COO.

     

    About FIATM – Family Is All That Matters

    FIATM programs are implemented to provide Academic Tutoring support, Mentoring and an athletic outlet for students five through 18 years old. FIATM currently focuses on the integration of Academics, Athletics, and Individual Empowerment.

     

    The T.E.A.C.H. PROGRAM

    TEACH is the main emphasis if The F.I.A.T.M. GROUP INC. From the ages of five through 18, this program assists in the Tutoring, Mentoring and Nurturing of youth and further sets forth the re-enforcement of Family and Family Values. An after-school tutoring and mentoring program established to serve all youth in our programs as a deterrent to truancy, drug and substance abuse, gang involvement, crime and disruptive behaviors that are prevalent in the community when students are left unsupervised.

     

    Next Level Athletics Alliance (NLAA)

    This is a complete youth sports program offering participation in a variety of competitive youth sports all of which may have Olympic ties.

    The NEXT LEVEL ATHLETICS ALLIANCE program offers our youth the opportunity to develop positive life skills and memories leading towards a promising future.

    These programs in itself will also assist in the edifying and promotion of Family Values that will enrich the community for years to come.

     

     Student Athlete Awareness Program (S.A.A.P)

    The structure creates an educational community where student/athletes and faculty share academic goals and join in a common intellectual quest. Teaching and learning, search for knowledge and understanding and the critical examination of ideas, values, and actions are the central activities of the program. The S.A.A.P. Structure is the catalyst where individualism of each person is honored and where courtesy and honesty are practiced.

     

    S.K.A.T.T.

    Through S.K.A.T.T. CHRONICLES we will provide a platform for our Youth to learn, train and perfect the craft of Media Arts and Journalism.

     

    S.K.A.T.T. CHRONICLES.  S.K.A.T.T. TALES the Animation Cartoon and potential movie will be launched in a collaborative effort with The Lift Entertainment Group.  President & COO of S.K.A.T.T. TALES and Executive Limited Partner of The Lift Entertainment. LaShae Brown.

     

    MTS – (MENTORING TO SUCCESS)

    MENTORING TO SUCCESS is a program series created to enhance the Tutoring & Mentoring Programs.  Our programs are structured to provide tutoring, counseling, cultural awareness, and personal development.

     

    Within the personal development component, we teach self-respect, respect for others, Leadership, Self Esteem and unlock creative and artistic abilities that may otherwise be underutilized in our youth.

     

    We are planning to further enhance the awareness of our youth to the different types of Colleges and Universities and Trade Schools throughout the nation for Academic and Athletic Direction.

     

    -end-

    Renaissance Downtowns USA and ICO Group – Team Meets with San Bernardino Leaders

    San Bernardino downtown building owners Howard Freeman, of realicore, CPA, Broker, and Jack Katzman, of ABO Real Estate ask questions about the vision is for a mixed-use development which would include commercial, retail, restaurant, entertainment, and mixed-income housing opportunities centered around the creation of construction jobs, permanent jobs and careers, as well as entrepreneurial opportunities for all San Bernardino residents.

    The RDICO team lead by (second from the left) Jian Torkan, Principal of ICO Real Estate Group, and Donald Monti, Renaissance Downtowns USA’s President and CEO talk to the team about the vision is for a mixed-use development. Seated on the far left is David Martinez, Publisher of the of the Inland Empire Business Journal and executive director of the Inland Empire International Business Association of Southern California.

     

     RDICO’s vision for the City of San Bernardino’s downtown is “to transform development patterns for the entire region by demonstrating how a disinvested community can be reinvented in a manner that includes all San Bernardino residents and business alike,” said Don Monti, CEO of Renaissance Downtowns USA.

     

    (San Bernardino, Calif.) The RDICO team lead by Jian Torkan, Principal of ICO Real Estate Group, and Donald Monti, Renaissance Downtowns USA’s President and CEO,  recently met with downtown San Bernardino business and property owners, county and city officials, and members of the San Bernardino Area Chamber of Commerce, Inland Empire Regional Chamber of Commerce, and held several meetings with community members and organizations during their week-long project-related meetings in San Bernardino.

    “The entire series of meetings were a complete success,” said RDICO’s Project Manager Ernesto Hidalgo. “We will continue this collaborative community engagement process because it really does work.”

    The RDICO partnership of Renaissance Downtowns USA and ICO Real Estate Group was selected by the City of San Bernardino as Master Developer for Downtown San Bernardino.

    “The vision is for a mixed-use development which would include commercial, retail, restaurant, entertainment, and mixed-income housing opportunities centered around the creation of construction jobs, permanent jobs and careers, as well as entrepreneurial opportunities for all San Bernardino residents,” said Monti.

    San Bernardino downtown building owners Howard Freeman, of realicore, CPA, Broker, and Jack Katzman, CEO of ABO Real Estate, ask questions about the vision is for a mixed-use development at the Double Tree Hotel in San Bernardino.  San Bernadino Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Judy Penman watches in the background.

    “This is just the beginning of many vision interactions between the RDICO Team, PlaceWorks (the City of San Bernardino’s designated planning firm), City Staff and the community at-large to ensure that this long-awaited project becomes a reality,” said Torkan.

    “Given its unique characteristics, San Bernardino has the potential to transform development patterns for the entire region by demonstrating how a disinvested community can be reinvented in a manner that includes all the City’s residents and business alike,” said Monti.

    Carl M. Dameron, creative director of Dameron Communications, Don Monti, RDICO partner and Gerhard Mayer of GGLO, survey the now-closed Carousel Mall, Woolworth Building, and surrounding area, to enable the RDICO Team to better understand the necessary parameters for moving forward. The tour was led by San Bernardino City Manager Rob Field, and Community and Economic Development Director Michael Huntley.

    San Bernardino City Manager Rob Field, and Community and Economic Development Director Michael Huntley, led a tour of the now-closed Carousel Mall, Woolworth Building, and surrounding area, to enable the RDICO Team to better understand the necessary parameters for moving forward.

    “In order for this momentum to escalate, the RDICO Team must continue their mission to further community support from the people of San Bernardino for this vision to finally become a reality,” said Monti.

    RDICO adheres to the Triple-Bottom-Line principles of socially, environmentally, and economically responsible development.

    San Bernardino Area Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Judy Penman brought together key downtown Business owners to interact the RDICO team during their week-long project-related meetings in San Bernardino.

    “The time is now. If not now, when?” said Monti.

    For more information and updates on the project, go to SanBernardinoDowntown.com.

     

    -30-

    Looking for a Speaker on Advertising and Public Relations?

    advertising and public relations

    Carl Dameron, creative director of Dameron Communications. “Sharing your stories is fun. Let me share the secrets of successful public relations and advertising.

    (San Bernardino, Calif.)  Businesses, government and civic groups that want to liven up their meetings with an interesting and informative advertising and public relations speaker should choose Carl Dameron, creative director of Dameron Communications.

    Dameron has run his own public relations firm for more than 30 years, and during that time he has shared his expertise on what makes a good story with everyone from local political candidates to national logistics firms.

    “The same elements that make interesting news releases also make good speeches, Dameron said. “In my presentations, I mix humor with a clear, direct message while delivering information you can put to work right away!”

    Dameron will explain how important it is to get in front of a story to drive national and regional advertising, public relations and news coverage.

    “People who hear me speak should leave with a better understanding of how to improve their own advertising and public relations efforts,” Dameron said. “Sharing your stories should be fun. Let me share the secrets behind successful public relations and advertising.

    Getting the attention of the news media is not easy.

    Editors, reporters and media managers are constantly bombarded with e-mails from PR people. Most are spiked right away, but releases from Dameron Communications always get a second look.

    How? Carl Dameron understands news and knows how to work with busy news professionals.

    advertising and public relations

    Dameron Communications has served Southern California clients since 1989

    Dameron is available to speak on several advertising and public relations topics including:

    • Advertising – How to create advertising that works — from flyers to TV commercials and everything in between
    • Public Relations – How to get media coverage and increase the positive perception of your organization
    • Government Relations – How to get elected officials to listen and how to leverage their influence
    • Community Relations – How get the community to understand and support your goals and objectives

    Dameron Communications clients include LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc., The City and County of San Bernardino, County of Riverside, RD-ICO, Moreno Valley Unified School District, Rialto Unified School District, Sprint, California Portland Cement Company, the AQMD, Dukes-Dukes and Associates, Inc., Toyota of San Bernardino, The Salvation Army and many more…

    Call (909) 534-9500 or email Carl@DameronCommunications.com to book your presentation.

    -end-

    5 Tips for Being the Face of Your Company

    Carl M. Dameron
    Carl M. Dameron Founder and creative director of Dameron Communications Photo by Robert A. Whitehead/CSUSB

    (San Bernardino, Calif.) Any company’s success is still often dictated by its portrayal in the traditional media.

    “For a company to really take off, it needs to be accessible to members of the press. So, instead of just sending out a press release every week, a company should be ready to reach out for interviews and provide quotes and soundbites to the media,” said Carl M. Dameron founder of Dameron Commercials.

    Establishing a face of the company is also a critical step in becoming media friendly. Whether it’s the CEO or an upper-level manager, the person representing the company should know the ins and outs of the industry and much more.

    Here are the five tips that everyone needs to follow when appearing on-camera. Most of it is good advice if we have lined up a print media interview for you as well, or even a phone interview.

    Dress Properly

    It might sound shallow, but people generally judge others based on how they look. So, decide how you want your company to be perceived by the audience and dress accordingly.

    For men, a suit and tie is the safest route to go. For women, it’s best to avoid vibrant clothing, excessive make up, and bulky jewelry as to not distract the viewers’ attention.

    Don’t come in with hair that’s too disheveled and covering your face – to be the face of a company, you need to proudly show off your face.

    In general, a clean, professional look should always work in most on-camera interview situations.

    Do Your Homework

    Once you get an opportunity to appear on camera (or on radio or print), you should portray yourself as an expert in not just your company, but in the industry as well.

    We will check to see if you can get the questions ahead of time, or at the least, find out what topics will be covered within the interview.  We will submit recommended questions when you have a broadcast interview, but it is up to the interviewer what questions are asked. The more prepared you are, the less likely it is that the words “Uh,” “Um,” and “You know” will make up your diction.

    Ignore the Bright Lights and Production Crew

    If you’re on TV there will probably be bright lights shining on you throughout the interview and there might even be a production team moving around in your line of vision. However, the cameras don’t pick up all the chaos going on behind the scenes.

    If you’re taking part in a one-on-one interview, your eyes and focus should be on the person conducting the interview. Averting your attention away from the interviewer for even a few seconds makes it seem like you’re disinterested, zoning out and lost.

    Avoid Industry Jargon

    When speaking about your business or industry, it’s best to use terms that everyone can understand, and take the time to explain industry terms in simple language. That way, people who are first learning about your company or industry will have an easier time of knowing what the heck you’re talking about.

    Be A Professional

    If you’re ever confronted by the interviewer with a question you’re uncomfortable answering, stay collected and take some time to craft a response. Simply saying “no comment” in a calm tone is much better than getting into a potential shouting match with the person in control of the interview. Plus, you don’t want to be on the wrong end of what could become a viral video in this day and age of YouTube.  

    -end-

    70:70 Ride A Cycling Trip Through San Bernardino

    70:70Ride - San Bernardino

    Ray Anderson, along with San Bernardino Mayor Carey Davis and Major Dan Henderson of The Salvation Army Corps will cycle their bikes through San Bernardino in the 70:70K Ride on Saturday, October 14. The goal is to raise $70,000 to purchase and rehab up to four houses for The Salvation Army’s “Path to Prosperity” program. Photos by: Larinda Jungjohann

    70:70Ride a bicycle trip through the streets of San Bernardino to raise money for The Salvation Army’s Path to Prosperity transitional living program

    (San Bernardino, Calif.) When talking about San Bernardino, its reputation often precedes it. Words like poverty and crime roll off the tongue too easily. Then came the worst massacre in the United States since 9/11 and the City of San Bernardino was once again in the news. And the news was not good.

    Ray Anderson, a business coach by trade and Salvation Army advisory board member, knew the negative images of his city were indelibly etched in the minds of people around the world. Adding terrorism to the list didn’t help. He wanted to see San Bernardino celebrated, not mourned or worse, ignored.

    On the eve of his 70th birthday, the wheels started turning.

    “We want to turn a negative image into something positive and uplifting,” Anderson said. “I’m committed to a personal effort to demonstrate that one person acting in faith can change the course of a family, a neighborhood and a community.

    “Specifically, I want to do something to unite people behind the transformation of San Bernardino and show off the good sides of the town. I just turned 70, so how about I bike 70 kilometers through the city?”
    Anderson, along with San Bernardino Mayor Carey Davis and Major Dan Henderson of The Salvation Army Corps will cycle their bikes through San Bernardino in the 70:70K Ride on Saturday, October 14.

    The goal is to raise $70,000 to purchase and rehab up to four houses for The Salvation Army’s “Path to Prosperity” program.  Through the program men have a safe, sober home to rent live in the while they compete their education, a job training and maintain a job while rebuilding their “spirit, family and life.”.
    The Path to Prosperity is open to any man who has successfully completed a substance abuse treatment program and can prove he has lived clean and sober for the last six months.

    70:70 - San Bernardino

    Ray Anderson, along with San Bernardino Mayor Carey Davis and Major Dan Henderson of The Salvation Army Corps will cycle their bikes through San Bernardino in the 70:70K Ride on Saturday, October 14. The goal is to raise $70,000 to purchase and rehab up to four houses for The Salvation Army’s “Path to Prosperity” program. Photos by: Larinda Jungjohann

    “The Path to Prosperity program is a final step to transform men with little hope into contributing members of the community,” Anderson said.

    The Path to Prosperity is currently limited to 30 men for the 18-month program.  The need is so great that there is a waiting list of those hoping to join when space is available.  The addition of four new homes will enable Path to Prosperity program to serve as many as 25 men on the waiting list.

    Anderson said the Path to Prosperity program has more than a decade of successfully returning 91 percent of clients, more than 323 graduates, back on the community, sober and self-sufficient.  He hopes to get as many people involved as he can to support the program, both through donations and the ride itself.
    A goal of 250 cyclists, led by San Bernardino Mayor Carey Davis, will navigate through the city and pass by some of the spots that make San Bernardino unique.

    The ride cruises along Historic Route 66, passes by the Little League West Regional Diamond, Cal State San Bernardino, San Manuel Casino, the International Airport, the 66ers San Manuel Stadium and ends at San Bernardino City Hall.

    A Vietnam veteran, Anderson said he remembers what it was like to come home to a less-than-welcoming environment. But work was plentiful. Now, the opposite is greeting our veterans, Anderson said.
    “Regardless of age, each of us can encourage and inspire others to pick up the gauntlet of change that will enable a new generation to reach for the stars with a simple act of focused giving,” Anderson said. “Specifically, I wanted to do something to unite people behind the transformation of San Bernardino.”

    70:70Ride - San Bernardino

    Ray Anderson will cycle along Historic Route 66, pass by the Little League West Regional Diamond, Cal State San Bernardino, San Manuel Casino, the International Airport, the 66ers San Manuel Stadium and ends at San Bernardino City Hall. Photos by: Larinda Jungjohann

    “The goal is to help men in trouble rebuild their lives through education or job training and return to society.  Instead of costing us $45,000 a year, recovered men can now contribute $30,000 or more to our local economy every year,” said Anderson.

    People can participate in a number of ways. Everyone is invited to ride along, even if only for short segments. Riders can ask friends and family to support their effort with an on-line donation at various levels.

    “You can contribute directly to the campaign at The Salvation Army link: 7070Ride.weebly.com,” said Anderson.

    The cost to join the 70:70 Ride is $70 per rider.

    “Realistically, I may never know the impact my chosen path made on the people, the city or those in the world around me,” Anderson said. “What I do know is unconditional love shown to me by family, friends and good-hearted people I’ve never met, compel me to return that love to a world desperately seeking it.”
    For more information, on the 70:70 Ride call Cesar Gomez at (909) 230-292. Or Register to ride at 70:70Ride.weebly.com   For information on the Path to Prosperity Program call the San Bernardino Corps headquarters at (909) 888-1336.

    Men seeking help to overcome drug or alcohol addiction should call their local Adult Rehabilitation Centers at (909) 889-9605 in San Bernardino County or (951) 940-5790 in Riverside County.

    About The Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps
    The Salvation Army may be able to provide emergency services including food; lodging for homeless or displaced families; clothing and furniture; assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Radio Network assists rescue workers and evacuees in such disasters as fires.

    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and also offers evangelical programs for boys, girls and adults. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY.

    -end-

     

    Keep The Bells Ringing This Christmas Season

     

    Photo 2 IMG_1652 Earl Perkins: Mr. Earl Perkins stands with his kettle by the entry doors at the Food 4 Less market on Victoria Ave. and Highland Ave. in San Bernardino. Earl is a Salvation Army Solider, and is in full uniform when he works. Earl has been with the Kansas City Salvation Army for over six years. Earl moved to San Bernardino four months ago, and is now a member of the San Bernardino Corps. Photo By Ricardo Tomboc

    Photo 2 IMG_1652 Earl Perkins: Mr. Earl Perkins stands with his kettle by the entry doors at the Food 4 Less market on Victoria Ave. and Highland Ave. in San Bernardino. Earl is a Salvation Army Solider, and is in full uniform when he works. Earl has been with the Kansas City Salvation Army for over six years. Earl moved to San Bernardino four months ago, and is now a member of the San Bernardino Corps. Photo By Ricardo Tomboc

    (SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.) The “miracle” of Christmas is repeated through the joy of caring and sharing. The San Bernardino Salvation Army (www.salvationarmyusa.org)  seek volunteers to Keep The Bells Ringing in Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto, and San Bernardino.
    The nationally recognized shiny red kettle is an integral part of the Christmas scene, with millions of dollars donated each year to aid needy families, seniors, and the homeless, in keeping with the spirit of the season.

    Photo 3 IMG_1590 Haskel and Claudia: Claudia Torres from San Bernardino and daughter Barbara, came by Macy’s to pick up some items, and decided to stop by the kettle to make a donation on her way out. Although Claudia had no idea what The Salvation Army uses the money for, she gave anyway. Claudia was informed all about the various ministries and how The Salvation Army helps feed the poor and homeless, and has a Transitional Living Center and Homeless shelter.

    Photo 3 IMG_1590 Haskel and Claudia: Claudia Torres from San Bernardino and daughter Barbara, came by Macy’s to pick up some items, and decided to stop by the kettle to make a donation on her way out. Although Claudia had no idea what The Salvation Army uses the money for, she gave anyway. Claudia was informed all about the various ministries and how The Salvation Army helps feed the poor and homeless, and has a Transitional Living Center and Homeless shelter.

    “This is a wonderful way to help disadvantaged people in our community, simply by volunteering as bell ringers,” said Major Daniel Henderson, commander of The Salvation Army of San Bernardino. “We’re looking for individuals, families and groups to spend a day at one of our more than 30 locations in our area.”

    The Salvation Army began ringing its bells this year on Friday, Nov. 18 and continues from 10 a.m. through 6 p.m., Monday through Saturday until Christmas Eve.

    Many volunteers ring two hours at a time, but groups are asked to provide ringers who can work in shifts for an entire day. Anyone who would like to donate a few hours of his or her time can volunteer.  Individuals under the age of 16 must be accompanied a parent or guardian.

    Salvation Army Board member Carl Dameron rings the bells with his family. Left to right: Malaika, Carl and Shaila. Photo by Ricard Tomboc

    Salvation Army Boardmember Carl M. Dameron Keeps the Bells Ringing with his family. Left to right: Malaika, Carl and Shaila. Photo by Ricard Tomboc

    “The more people who volunteer, the fewer people the agency must hire,” said Major Henderson.  “Each volunteer who Keeps the Bells Ringing saves us $10 an hour.  That means more money raised in direct support of our services goes to families in need.”

    Where does the money raised by the ringing bells in San Bernardino go?  The Salvation Army provides emergency services including food; lodging for homeless or displaced families; clothing and furniture; assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) assists rescue workers and evacuees in  disasters such as fires and earthquakes.

    For Christmas, the Salvation Army creates holiday food baskets for about 500 local families. On Christmas Eve, The Salvation Army of San Bernardino hosts a Christmas Dinner that historically provides a delicious meal to approximatly 300 people. Donations raised by volunteers who Keep The Bells Ringing  help make this possible.

    The Corp has other need for your finial and food donations. “The San Bernardino Corps needs food every day for those at its Hospitality House and Transitional Living Center,” said Integrated Mission Coordinator Lieutenant Cathie McCulley.  Up to 100 family members stay in its transitional and emergency family shelters.

    Photo 1 IMG_144 Shey Walmart: Mr. Shey Holden takes his post at the front of the Walmart on Mt. Vernon Ave. in Colton. Shey is a volunteer with The Salvation Army, and is planning on giving at least 30 hours this season. Photo By Ricardo Tomboc

    Photo 1 IMG_144 Shey Walmart: Mr. Shey Holden takes his post at the front of the Walmart on Mt. Vernon Ave. in Colton. Shey is a volunteer with The Salvation Army, and is planning on giving at least 30 hours this season. Photo By Ricardo Tomboc

    Up to 300 people who receive a free dinner served Sunday through Friday at 4:45 p.m. at The Transitional Living Center, 925 West 10th Street in San Bernardino. Your donations are needed to keep this program going.

    To volunteer to Keep The Bells Ringing, call The Salvation Army at (909) 888-1336.
    To donate to The Salvation Army online, go to: www.salvationarmyusa.org. To donate by phone call 1-800-SAL-ARMY (800-725-2769).

    Donors may drop off turkeys, other food, cash or gift cards at the Salvation Army’s Corps Office at 2626 Pacific St., in San Bernardino, CA 92346, phone (909) 888-1336.

    How the Bell Ringer campaign began:
    Captain Joseph McFee, serving with the San Francisco Salvation Army Corps in 1891, wanted to serve Christmas dinner to the poor in his neighborhood. But he didn’t have money to do so.

    As a sailor in Liverpool, England, Captain Mcfee saw people on the docks throw money into a large kettle called “Simpson’s Pot” to help the poor. He decided this might work in California too.

    Captain Mcfee set up a kettle at the Oakland Ferry Landing, which operated a ferry that was, in those days, the only way across San Francisco Bay. He put a sign on the kettle saying “Keep the Pot Boiling” and raised enough money to serve the Christmas dinner.

    His idea spread quickly, and by 1897 Salvation Army Corps nationwide were collecting money in kettles to serve the needy in their communities. Among the Salvation Army Corps collecting money this way before the turn of the 20th Century was The Salvation Army of San Bernardino, which formed in 1887.

    About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps
    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and offers holistic programs for individuals of all. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has served San Bernardino and the Inland Empire  since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. The San Bernardino Corps of The Salvation Army serves Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto, and San Bernardino.

    Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY. Our local service number is (909) 888-1336.

    Photo 4 IMG_1538 Haskel at Macys: Mr. Haskel Herndon is ringing his Christmas bell at the Macy’s department store at the Inland Center Mall. Haskel greets every customer he comes in contact with. Haskel opens the door for the ladies and for those with handfuls of packages! Haskel has been a Soldier with the Salvation Army for 3 months now. Photo By Ricardo Tomboc

    Photo 4 IMG_1538 Haskel at Macys: Mr. Haskel Herndon is ringing his Christmas bell at the Macy’s department store at the Inland Center Mall. Haskel greets every customer he comes in contact with. Haskel opens the door for the ladies and for those with handfuls of packages! Haskel has been a Soldier with the Salvation Army for 3 months now. Photo By Ricardo Tomboc

    -end-

    Free Thanksgiving Day Dinner At The Salvation Army for 138 Years

     

    Volunteers serve Thanksgiving Dinner at The Salvation Army: Serving on the food line (left to right) is Nancy Veaegas, Niyahn Summey, Walt Summey, and Robert Sanchez. We are ready for Christmas Dinners.

    Volunteers serve Thanksgiving Dinner at The Salvation Army: Serving on the food line (left to right) is Nancy Veaegas, Niyahn Summey, Walt Summey, and Robert Sanchez. We are ready for Christmas Dinners.  Photo by Ricardo Tomboc.

     
    (SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.) – Salvation Army chapters throughout the Inland Empire will serve Thanksgiving Day meals, to all that attend including those who are without fa ily or unable to provide a full-course turkey dinner for themselves.

    The San Bernardino Corps has served Thanksgiving dinner for 138 years.

    “We are pleased to prove God’s spirit of giving and provide a Thanksgiving Day dinner to those in need,” said Major Henderson, corps officer at the San Bernardino Corps. “We also welcome those who are familiar with the many other services we offer throughout the year.”

    The San Bernardino Corps is the dinner at the Corps new headquarters at 2626 Pacific Avenue, San Bernardino, where it moved in August of 2015.

    At many locations, including the San Bernardino Corps, these meals take place from 11 a.m.to 1 p.m., or until food runs out. Some locations will offer meals earlier and/or later in the day.

    The Salvation Army relies mostly on donations, so food will vary somewhat at locations, but will include turkey or chicken, pies, stuffing or rice, cranberry sauce, pies, cakes, greens, and other side dishes.
    “We always have plenty of donations for Thanksgiving, but if you’d like to bring some non-perishable food it is always welcomed,” said Major Henderson.

    “In addition to our Thanksgiving Day meal, we serve dinners to about 75 homeless women and children every day, and to some 25 men who are currently taking advantage of our cold-weather shelter in the evenings,” said Lt. Cathie McCully

    Chef Richie

    The Cook Richie shows of his work sliced Turkey Brest ready to be served. Photo by Ricardo Tomboc

    Six nights a week, we serve meals close to 200 hungry people, some who are homeless and some who have a place to live, but need help with food to pay for everything else.

    “The Salvation Army, San Bernardino will be giving toys for hundreds of children and 600 families holiday food baskets a few days before Christmas,” said Lt. McCully
    Other corps of The Salvation Army also plan Thanksgiving meals. Call one of the phone numbers listed below learn the time and location of meals in your area.

    • San Bernardino, 2626 Pacific Avenue, (909) 888-1336. Thursday, November 24 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
    • Riverside, 3695 First Street, (951) 784-3571. Wednesday, November 23 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
    • Redlands, 838 Alta St., (909) 792-6868. Thursday, November 24 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
    • Moreno Valley, 14075 Frederick St., (951) 653-9131. Thursday, November 24 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
    • Ontario, 1412 S. Euclid Ave., (909) 986-6748. Thursday, November 24 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
    • Victorville, 14585 La Paz Drive, (760) 245-2545. The Victorville Corps has traditionally served two Thanksgiving dinners, one at its headquarters and another in Apple Valley at the James A. Woody Community Center on 13467 Navajo Road.  Both meals are served Thursday, November 24 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
    • Hemet, 340 S. Palm Ave., (951) 791-9495. Thursday, November 24th 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

    If you wish to be a volunteer to help the Salvation Army this Thanksgiving and Christmas season, please call The Salvation Army nearest you or call (909) 888-1336.

    About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps
    The Salvation Army may be able to provide emergency services including food; lodging for homeless or displaced families; clothing and furniture; assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) assists rescue workers and evacuees in such disasters as fires.

    The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and also offers evangelical programs for boys, girls and adults. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY. Our local number is (909) 888-1336.

     -end-

    All photos by Ricardo Tomboc, Salvation Army board member

    Local College Student Wins National American Advertising Federation Award

    Chris Lopez photo

    WINNING ARTIST—Christopher Lopez, a fashion design student at the Art Institute in San Bernardino holds the gold (ADDY) advertising award he won for his fashion illustrations in the Inland Empire competition earlier this year. On June 13, he won a silver ADDY at the national convention in Las Vegas, becoming the first fashion design student to ever win a national award at the American Advertising Federation competition. The artistic designs are from his award winning HAUS of Wonderland-A Fairy Tale Couture collection of fashion illustrations. Photos by Robert Swapp Photography.


    Christopher Lopez, a junior at the Art Institute wins a Silver ADDY, the first national award by a fashion design student from the Inland Empire
     
    (San Bernardino, CA) A local college student has made history for being the first fashion design student from the Inland Empire to ever win a Silver Award in national competition sponsored by the American Advertising Federation.
     
    Christopher Lopez, 28, of Moreno Valley won a Silver ADDY award in the student competition at the 2015 National American Advertising Federation Conference at Caesar’s Palace in Las Vegas, Nevada on June 13.
     
    Lopez is a third year student in the bachelor of arts program in fashion design at the Art Institute of California-Inland Empire campus in San Bernardino.
     
    His creation, HAUS of Wonderland—A c Tale Couture, earned the award for excellence in the Illustration Campaign category. To advance to the national level, Lopez needed to win at two levels of competition. He first won a gold ADDY in local Inland Empire competition, then a silver award at the district level earlier this year.
     
    The American Advertising Awards (formerly ADDY’s) recognize excellence in professional and student artistic work in a three-tier system, starting in the Inland Empire and advancing to district and national competition. Over 40,000 submissions are received for judging every year at the national level in a variety of categories.
     
    “This is a very prestigious award,” said Su Pak, president of the local chapter of the American Advertising Federation. “It’s the first time a fashion design student from the Inland Empire has advanced to win a silver award at the national level. This is a remarkable achievement and we are very proud of Chris!”
     
    As a student artist, Lopez has a passion for design. “I always like to tell a story with each of my pieces. I want my audience to get drawn into a wonderland-like state when exploring each piece with my designs, and great attention to detail, and that’s exactly what I delivered with this fashionably adventurous collection.”
     
    HAUS of Wonderland-A Fairy Tale Couture is a fashion illustration collection that Lopez says was inspired by Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and present day couture fashion.
     
    His collection features four highly stylized sketches that are designed for a couture runway show or costumes for a film, play or musical. “Each piece is based on four characters from the story, featuring the adventurous Alice, the elaborate yet villainous Queen of Hearts and trouble making duo, the Tweedle Twins, Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum.”
     
    After graduation from the Art Institute in 2016, Lopez wants be a costume designer for film, TV and the entertainment business. “I love telling stories and making them come to life with my designs. I love working with themes and concepts. I’m an artist at heart and my family says it’s in my blood.” At the Art Institute, career service advisors assist students with job placement as they near graduation.
     
    Lopez is from Los Angeles and grew up in Arcadia where he developed his artistic passion for fashion illustration in high school. Later, he chose the Art Institute in San Bernardino because it was closer to his new home in Moreno Valley and offered everything he wanted to reach his career goals.
     
    What’s his best advice for young aspiring artists? “Achieving this award truly made my Wonderland become a reality,” said Lopez. “Make your Wonderland become a reality by working hard and having true passion for your art and craft.”
    For more information contact: John Barry, public relations, AAF-Inland Empire, jpbarry05@yahoo.com  (714)457-2279 or visit www.aaf-inlandempire.com to learn more about coming events.

    -end-

    Breast Cancer Awareness Honored with Actress Erika Ringor and Olympian Brigetta Barrett

    Riverside, CA – The 2nd Annual Pink & White Celebration is on Sunday, October 5, 2014 at D and D’s Dance Center in Riverside at 1445 Spruce Street. “We are honoring local breast cancer survivors and honor women who are positive role models relative to health & wellness,” said Carrie Madrid, breast cancer survivor, founder and CEO of Lady Huskies, Inc.

    This year a “Woman of Excellence Award” has been added to the 2nd Annual Pink & White Celebration.
    “The two honorees chosen this year have overcome adversity and excelled in their personal lives to not only achieve greatness, but have dedicated themselves to raising awareness of women’s health and wellness,” said  Madrid.

    This breast cancer awareness month fundraising gala will honor local breast cancer survivors. Madrid is a Stage III breast cancer survivor of 2 years; she shares her story in hopes of raising awareness and inspiring others.

    Erika Ringor is known for her role in the motion picture Love & Basketball

    The honorees chosen are actress Erika Ringor and 2012 track Olympian Brigetta Barrett. Erika is known for her role in the motion picture Love & Basketball, among other movies and is now a Fitness and Health Coach for a major health and wellness company.

    Brigetta Barrett is a high jumper from the United States. Her biggest success is winning the silver medal at the 2012 Olympic Games in London. She is returning to the 2016 Olympics.
    “If you know of a Breast Cancer survivor please ask her to register and come to the 2nd Annual Pink & White Celebration to celebrate surviving and thriving in life,” said Madrid.

    This breast cancer awareness month fundraising gala will honor local breast cancer survivors. Madrid is a Stage III breast cancer survivor of two years; she shares her story in hopes of raising awareness and inspiring others.

    The “Woman of Excellence Award” honorees will be presented with an original work of art created by artist John Barge III. The official unveilings of these works of art will take place at the 2nd Annual Pink & White Celebration.

    “We invite everyone to attend and enjoy special appearances by jazz saxophonist, Mark Allen Felton and vocalists, “L.A. the Don” with Jazmine Culpepper; World Champion Mixed Marshal Arts (MMA) Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC), Jenae Noonan and artist Brandy Loves2Draw”, said Madrid.

    Lady Huskies, Inc. is IRS recognized 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. Event proceeds go to the girls’ basketball program at John W. North High School and to the American Cancer Society to help breast cancer suffers.

    This breast cancer awareness month fundraising gala will honor local breast cancer survivors. Madrid is a Stage III breast cancer survivor of 2 years; she shares her story in hopes of raising awareness and inspiring others.

    Meet World Champion Mixed Marshal Arts (MMA) Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC), Jenae Noonan at the 2nd Annual Pink & White Celebration.

    Tickets are $25.00 per person and can be purchased on the website or at the door. Tables of eight are available for $200 if purchased by October 1. We request that all breast cancer survivors to be registered by October 1, 2014.

    “We are honoring local breast cancer survivors. We also honor two women who are positive role models relative to health and wellness,” said breast cancer survivor Carrie Madrid, founder and CEO of Lady Huskies, Inc.

    “We are honoring local breast cancer survivors. We also honor two women who are positive role models relative to health and wellness,” said breast cancer survivor Carrie Madrid, founder and CEO of Lady Huskies, Inc.

    For more information or to register a survivor, make a donation; please contact Carrie Madrid at 951-707-7965 or carrie_madrid@yahoo.com.

    -end-

    LaSalle Medical Associates Three Decades of Making People Healthier 

    LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc Celebrates 30 years of medical service. Left to right: Anna Canton, Human Resource Manager, Kristina Hlebo, Finance Assistant, Carl Meier, executive vice president, Dr. Albert Arteaga CEO, Alexandra Acosta, Director of Finance and Lizette Noriega, Human Resource AssistantKristina Hlebo, Finance Assistant Alexandra Acosta, Director of Finance Lizette Noriega, Human Resource Assistant

    LaSalle Medical Associates cure for Plantar Fasciitis , Inc Celebrates 30 years of medical service with the corporate management team. Left to right: Anna Canton, Human Resource Manager; Kristina Hlebo, Finance Assistant,;Carl Meier, executive vice president; Dr. Albert Arteaga CEO; Alexandra Acosta, Director of Finance and Lizette Noriega, Human Resource Assistant. Alexandra Acosta, Director of Finance and Lizette Noriega, Human Resource Assistant


    (SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.) In June of 1984, a young doctor and his wife, a nurse, opened a family medical practice called LaSalle Medical Associates in Fontana. Their goal: provide affordable health care, with dignity and respect, to all in the Inland Empire.
     
    Three decades later, Dr. Albert and Maria Arteaga have gone far beyond making their goal a reality. They are now recognized as one of the leading health care providers in the Inland Empire, if not all of California.
     
    “We have had some markers of success,” Dr. Arteaga says. “We went from two employees – my wife and I – to a fully staffed clinic. We opened more clinics. Then we started our own IPA (independent practice association) to keep up with new demands to make health care more and more efficient.”
     
    “It has always been our goal to treat as many patients as we could while giving them the best health care possible,” he said.
     
    Some, who have recognized LaSalle Medical Associates as a leader in health care, by giving them awards for their endeavors, include:

    • The federal Center for Disease Control, which recognized Dr. Arteaga as California’s first Childhood Immunization Champion. This award recognized his efforts in educating the parents of LaSalle’s pediatric patients, and the greater Inland Empire community, of the importance of childhood immunizations
    • The California Medical Association, which recognized Dr. Arteaga with its Ethnic Physician’s Leadership Award, recognizing his contributions to improving health care in the Latino community
    • The San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors Resolution Award for outstanding community efforts
    • The San Bernardino County Medical Society’s Merlin Hendrickson, M.D. Award for Outstanding Contribution to the Community. Dr. Arteaga was recognized for his efforts to provide health services to Inland Empire children.

    Maria and Dr. Albert Arteaga. The California Medical Association awarded Abert Arteaga the “Ethnic Physician’s Leadership Award,” recognizing his contributions to medical care in the Latino community.

    Maria and Dr. Albert Arteaga. The California Medical Association awarded Abert Arteaga the “Ethnic Physician’s Leadership Award,” recognizing his contributions to medical care in the Latino community.

    • Inland Empire Health Plan (IEHP), as Riverside and San Bernardino counties’ best health care provider, and for being one of the top enrollers in all of California in the state’s former Healthy Families program
    • The African American Health Initiative as a model provider in a two-year study of Black health care in San Bernardino County.
    • Hispanic Lifestyle Magazine, which recognized LaSalle Medical Associates as one of the top 15 Latino-owned businesses in the Inland Empire

     
     
    Despite all this success, it hasn’t always been an easy path for the Arteagas.
     
    “Life doesn’t always play out as you expect,” Dr. Arteaga said. “That is certainly true in my life as a health care provider. Good intentions require good management. Providing good management has been every bit as challenging as my years in medical school were more than three decades ago!”
     
    One of the biggest changes in health care took place just this year. In 2014, Covered California part of the federal Affordable Health Care Act – which Dr. Arteaga has long been a champion of – came into being.
     
    “Although Covered California does not yet mean everyone has insurance, it does mean that many patients who couldn’t afford health care before now can do so,” Dr. Arteaga said. “Health care is no longer an out-of-reach luxury for those who couldn’t afford insurance, but is a basic right for everyone
     
    Dr. Arteaga has always thought that health care is a basic right, and has operated LaSalle Medical Associates as if that were the case.
     
    Dr. Arteaga targeted his marketing to Latinos and low-income people who were underserved.  Providing high quality medical services to underserved populations were crucial to the success of LaSalle Medical Associates.  They later expanded from Fontana to San Bernardino and Hesperia. These communities have many low-income people in need of quality affordable medical services.
     
    He also is Latino, so he easily related to his Latino patients in ways they appreciated. They told friends and family about LaSalle Medical Associates, which caused his popularity in the Inland Empire’s Latino culture to swell.

    RN Maria and Dr. Albert Arteaga partners in healthcare and family Ce;berate 30 years of Making People Healthier  in California.

    RN Maria and Dr. Albert Arteaga partners in healthcare and family Ce;berate 30 years of Making People Healthier in California.


    Dr. Arteaga has always believed that his key to business success was finding a way to get paid for their services, instead of telling patients they had to figure that out on their own before seeing him. For most of LaSalle’s history, that business model meant LaSalle employees educated patients about their health care insurance options.
     
    Most patients LaSalle saw over the years qualified for either Medi-Cal or Healthy Families. The latter, which like Medi-Cal was run by the state of California, offered low to moderate-income parents who didn’t qualify for Medi-Cal a subsidy for the health care of their children from birth to age 19.

    Many uninsured families with children under 19 can get help through the Healthy Families program; help is also available to some children and adults through Medi-Cal. For those who don’t qualify for these programs, the Affordable Health Care Act of 2010 provides additional options. Photo by: Albert Ateaga

    Things have changed in the last two years. In 2013, California got a head start on the Affordable Care Act; they created Covered California and merged Healthy Families and Medi-Cal together. 

    In 2014, one of the key Covered California’s requirements is everyone must have health insurance or pay a penalty. This means, many patients applied and signed up for Covered California, Medi-Cal or other insurance first, and then choose or are assigned to LaSalle Medical Associates.
     
    Consequently, rather than informing new patients of their insurance options, LaSalle Medical Associates employees now more likely are helping the patients understand how their health insurance system works.
     
     
    Dr. Arteaga acknowledges the Covered California has brought changes some people will take a while to get accustomed to. One of these is a concept called managed care.
     
    “The structure of the Covered California means many people, both those who had some other type of insurance and those who were uninsured, are now in managed care for the first time,” he said.
    LaSalles-Medical-Asscoaites
    Managed care is called this because it requires a doctor, such as one of the physicians in LaSalle Medical Associates, to coordinate patients’ health care services. These primary care doctors have a general, family or pediatric practice, and will treat patients for many of their symptoms, but will refer the patients to specialists when more expertise is needed.
     
    Managed care has been around since the 1990s, Dr. Arteaga said, but it has become more popular. It’s usually more cost-efficient to have managed care, he explained, people choose to buy managed care for its lower premiums.
     
    Medi-Cal has used managed care for nearly two decades. Meanwhile, LaSalle Medical Associates, since the beginning, has accepted Medi-Cal when many doctors would not, and now has a reputation among those familiar with Medi-Cal for providing quality services, no matter how payment is provided.
     
    Even though there wasn’t “managed care,” as it now known when Dr. Arteaga started his practice, even back then he was in favor of patients developing close relationships with one family doctor.
     
    “Thirty years ago I wanted to see all the patients, and manage their health care. That has not changed, but I have learned that in order to do so, a physician must take a leadership role. Otherwise, many patients will seek or demand services that are redundant or not needed.”
     
     
    Dr. Arteaga sees the physician as an advocate for the patient, one who will make sure patients get the services they truly need. Sometimes, just as some patients will push for more health care than is necessary, some insurance companies will resist paying for what a doctor recommends, but that is not the intent of managed care.
     
    “I want the patient, the doctor and the insurance company to develop a positive team, Dr. Arteaga said. “There may be opposition, but that should not stop any of us in trying to make quality health care succeed.”
     
    Besides managed care and its great expansion through the Affordable Care Act, another large change in the health care industry over the last three decades has been more careful monitoring of expenses by insurance companies.
     
    Now, it is better for a medical group like LaSalle Medical Associates to band with even more doctors, so they can take advantage of economies of scale, and provide health care more cost-efficiently.
     
    This is why LaSalle Medical Associates formed an Independent Practice Association (IPA) in 1995, and has grown it to the point it now serves more than 600 medical clinics serving more than 170,000 patients each year in nine California counties.
     
    LaSalle oversees administrative functions of all these medical clinics, although they are owned and manage their patients’ health care separately.
     
    Another move to make health care more efficient, in many ways, is one that LaSalle Medical Associates only recently transitioned to. It now is keeping track of patients’ charts with electronic medical records, ridding itself of the wall full of patients’ medical records that once were a hallmark of many medical clinics.
     
    “Electronic medical records make it easier to share patients’ records among a team of doctors who treat one patient, which results in better health care” Dr. Arteaga said. “It is also easier to keep patients’ records confidential this way.”
     
    One other significant change over the last 30 years has been that most patients are more involved in their health care now than they were in 1984.
     
    “They ask more questions now. Because of the Internet, and because people talk more about health care with their friends, patients now have more information. Not all of the information out there is correct, so this means a doctor helps the patient sort the good from the bad, and develop a treatment plan that works. This is another reason why the managed care approach is necessary.”

    “As pediatricians, we strive for 100 percent immunizations of pediatric patients and, while that’s probably a utopian objective, our goal is to get as close as to that 100 percent as we can,’’ says Dr. Albert Arteaga, president and founder of LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc. . “This CDC recognition is the fruit of two to three years of intense labor on part of me and staff.”

    “As pediatricians, we strive for 100 percent immunizations of pediatric patients and, while that’s probably a utopian objective, our goal is to get as close as to that 100 percent as we can,’’ says Dr. Albert Arteaga, president and founder of LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc. . “This CDC recognition is the fruit of two to three years of intense labor on part of me and staff.”


    One thing Dr. Arteaga has learned during his three decades of medical practice is that change can be good. In fact, one thing he loves about being the CEO of LaSalle Medical Associates is that he gets to lead other health care professionals through the changes their industry faces.
     
    “I love being collegial, and helping other doctors learn,” he said. “When they resist change, it is going to be more difficult for them. They should not expect to practice medicine as it was done 30 years ago, or even 10 years ago.”

    On the first day, owner Dr. Albert Arteaga and his wife Maria then employed as his nurse and still his chief assistant saw two patients at their clinic in Fontana. Today, LaSalle Medical Associates has grown to four clinics and 120 employees, and an Independent Practice Association (IPA) serving more than 1,900 doctors.


    In the end is true LaSalle Medical Associates has spent Three Decades Making People Healthier.

    For more information about LaSalle Medical Associates, call (909) 890-0407 or go on line to LaSalleMedical.com.

     
    About LaSalle Medical Associates
    LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc., operates four clinics employing more than 120 dedicated healthcare professionals, treating children, adults, and seniors in San Bernardino County.  LaSalle’s patients are primarily served by Medi-Cal and they also accept IEHP, Molina, Blue Cross, Blue Shield, Care 1st, and Health Net and Medicare by Easy Choice Health Plan, Molina and Care1st Health Plans.   LaSalle’s clinics are located at 17577 Arrow Blvd. in Fontana, 16455 Main St. in Hesperia and1505 West 17th St. and 565 N. Mt. Vernon Ave. in San Bernardino.
     
    LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc., is also an Independent Practice Association (IPA) of independently contracted doctors, hospitals and clinics, delivering high quality patience care with more than 170,000 patient visits per year in Fresno, Kings, Los Angeles, Madera, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Joaquin and Tulare Counties.
     
    LaSalle’s IPA members in the Inland Empire include:  LaSalle Medical Associates, Banning Medical Group and San Bernardino Urological Associates.  Hospital affiliations include: Rancho Springs Medical Center, Arrowhead Regional Medical Center, Community Hospital of San Bernardino, St. Bernadine Medical Center, Mountains Community Hospital, Redland Community Hospital, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Corona Regional Medical Center, Riverside County Medical Center, Parkview Community Hospital, Kaiser Moreno Valley, Kaiser Fontana and Kaiser Riverside.
     
     
     
    -end-